Merge from vendor branch BIND:
[dragonfly.git] / secure / lib / libcrypto / man / rand.3
1 .\" Automatically generated by Pod::Man v1.37, Pod::Parser v1.14
2 .\"
3 .\" Standard preamble:
4 .\" ========================================================================
5 .de Sh \" Subsection heading
6 .br
7 .if t .Sp
8 .ne 5
9 .PP
10 \fB\\$1\fR
11 .PP
12 ..
13 .de Sp \" Vertical space (when we can't use .PP)
14 .if t .sp .5v
15 .if n .sp
16 ..
17 .de Vb \" Begin verbatim text
18 .ft CW
19 .nf
20 .ne \\$1
21 ..
22 .de Ve \" End verbatim text
23 .ft R
24 .fi
25 ..
26 .\" Set up some character translations and predefined strings.  \*(-- will
27 .\" give an unbreakable dash, \*(PI will give pi, \*(L" will give a left
28 .\" double quote, and \*(R" will give a right double quote.  | will give a
29 .\" real vertical bar.  \*(C+ will give a nicer C++.  Capital omega is used to
30 .\" do unbreakable dashes and therefore won't be available.  \*(C` and \*(C'
31 .\" expand to `' in nroff, nothing in troff, for use with C<>.
32 .tr \(*W-|\(bv\*(Tr
33 .ds C+ C\v'-.1v'\h'-1p'\s-2+\h'-1p'+\s0\v'.1v'\h'-1p'
34 .ie n \{\
35 .    ds -- \(*W-
36 .    ds PI pi
37 .    if (\n(.H=4u)&(1m=24u) .ds -- \(*W\h'-12u'\(*W\h'-12u'-\" diablo 10 pitch
38 .    if (\n(.H=4u)&(1m=20u) .ds -- \(*W\h'-12u'\(*W\h'-8u'-\"  diablo 12 pitch
39 .    ds L" ""
40 .    ds R" ""
41 .    ds C` ""
42 .    ds C' ""
43 'br\}
44 .el\{\
45 .    ds -- \|\(em\|
46 .    ds PI \(*p
47 .    ds L" ``
48 .    ds R" ''
49 'br\}
50 .\"
51 .\" If the F register is turned on, we'll generate index entries on stderr for
52 .\" titles (.TH), headers (.SH), subsections (.Sh), items (.Ip), and index
53 .\" entries marked with X<> in POD.  Of course, you'll have to process the
54 .\" output yourself in some meaningful fashion.
55 .if \nF \{\
56 .    de IX
57 .    tm Index:\\$1\t\\n%\t"\\$2"
58 ..
59 .    nr % 0
60 .    rr F
61 .\}
62 .\"
63 .\" For nroff, turn off justification.  Always turn off hyphenation; it makes
64 .\" way too many mistakes in technical documents.
65 .hy 0
66 .if n .na
67 .\"
68 .\" Accent mark definitions (@(#)ms.acc 1.5 88/02/08 SMI; from UCB 4.2).
69 .\" Fear.  Run.  Save yourself.  No user-serviceable parts.
70 .    \" fudge factors for nroff and troff
71 .if n \{\
72 .    ds #H 0
73 .    ds #V .8m
74 .    ds #F .3m
75 .    ds #[ \f1
76 .    ds #] \fP
77 .\}
78 .if t \{\
79 .    ds #H ((1u-(\\\\n(.fu%2u))*.13m)
80 .    ds #V .6m
81 .    ds #F 0
82 .    ds #[ \&
83 .    ds #] \&
84 .\}
85 .    \" simple accents for nroff and troff
86 .if n \{\
87 .    ds ' \&
88 .    ds ` \&
89 .    ds ^ \&
90 .    ds , \&
91 .    ds ~ ~
92 .    ds /
93 .\}
94 .if t \{\
95 .    ds ' \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*8/10-\*(#H)'\'\h"|\\n:u"
96 .    ds ` \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*8/10-\*(#H)'\`\h'|\\n:u'
97 .    ds ^ \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*10/11-\*(#H)'^\h'|\\n:u'
98 .    ds , \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*8/10)',\h'|\\n:u'
99 .    ds ~ \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu-\*(#H-.1m)'~\h'|\\n:u'
100 .    ds / \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*8/10-\*(#H)'\z\(sl\h'|\\n:u'
101 .\}
102 .    \" troff and (daisy-wheel) nroff accents
103 .ds : \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*8/10-\*(#H+.1m+\*(#F)'\v'-\*(#V'\z.\h'.2m+\*(#F'.\h'|\\n:u'\v'\*(#V'
104 .ds 8 \h'\*(#H'\(*b\h'-\*(#H'
105 .ds o \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu+\w'\(de'u-\*(#H)/2u'\v'-.3n'\*(#[\z\(de\v'.3n'\h'|\\n:u'\*(#]
106 .ds d- \h'\*(#H'\(pd\h'-\w'~'u'\v'-.25m'\f2\(hy\fP\v'.25m'\h'-\*(#H'
107 .ds D- D\\k:\h'-\w'D'u'\v'-.11m'\z\(hy\v'.11m'\h'|\\n:u'
108 .ds th \*(#[\v'.3m'\s+1I\s-1\v'-.3m'\h'-(\w'I'u*2/3)'\s-1o\s+1\*(#]
109 .ds Th \*(#[\s+2I\s-2\h'-\w'I'u*3/5'\v'-.3m'o\v'.3m'\*(#]
110 .ds ae a\h'-(\w'a'u*4/10)'e
111 .ds Ae A\h'-(\w'A'u*4/10)'E
112 .    \" corrections for vroff
113 .if v .ds ~ \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*9/10-\*(#H)'\s-2\u~\d\s+2\h'|\\n:u'
114 .if v .ds ^ \\k:\h'-(\\n(.wu*10/11-\*(#H)'\v'-.4m'^\v'.4m'\h'|\\n:u'
115 .    \" for low resolution devices (crt and lpr)
116 .if \n(.H>23 .if \n(.V>19 \
117 \{\
118 .    ds : e
119 .    ds 8 ss
120 .    ds o a
121 .    ds d- d\h'-1'\(ga
122 .    ds D- D\h'-1'\(hy
123 .    ds th \o'bp'
124 .    ds Th \o'LP'
125 .    ds ae ae
126 .    ds Ae AE
127 .\}
128 .rm #[ #] #H #V #F C
129 .\" ========================================================================
130 .\"
131 .IX Title "rand 3"
132 .TH rand 3 "2007-03-28" "0.9.8e" "OpenSSL"
133 .SH "NAME"
134 rand \- pseudo\-random number generator
135 .SH "SYNOPSIS"
136 .IX Header "SYNOPSIS"
137 .Vb 1
138 \& #include <openssl/rand.h>
139 .Ve
140 .PP
141 .Vb 1
142 \& int  RAND_set_rand_engine(ENGINE *engine);
143 .Ve
144 .PP
145 .Vb 2
146 \& int  RAND_bytes(unsigned char *buf, int num);
147 \& int  RAND_pseudo_bytes(unsigned char *buf, int num);
148 .Ve
149 .PP
150 .Vb 3
151 \& void RAND_seed(const void *buf, int num);
152 \& void RAND_add(const void *buf, int num, int entropy);
153 \& int  RAND_status(void);
154 .Ve
155 .PP
156 .Vb 3
157 \& int  RAND_load_file(const char *file, long max_bytes);
158 \& int  RAND_write_file(const char *file);
159 \& const char *RAND_file_name(char *file, size_t num);
160 .Ve
161 .PP
162 .Vb 1
163 \& int  RAND_egd(const char *path);
164 .Ve
165 .PP
166 .Vb 3
167 \& void RAND_set_rand_method(const RAND_METHOD *meth);
168 \& const RAND_METHOD *RAND_get_rand_method(void);
169 \& RAND_METHOD *RAND_SSLeay(void);
170 .Ve
171 .PP
172 .Vb 1
173 \& void RAND_cleanup(void);
174 .Ve
175 .PP
176 .Vb 3
177 \& /* For Win32 only */
178 \& void RAND_screen(void);
179 \& int RAND_event(UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
180 .Ve
181 .SH "DESCRIPTION"
182 .IX Header "DESCRIPTION"
183 Since the introduction of the \s-1ENGINE\s0 \s-1API\s0, the recommended way of controlling
184 default implementations is by using the \s-1ENGINE\s0 \s-1API\s0 functions. The default
185 \&\fB\s-1RAND_METHOD\s0\fR, as set by \fIRAND_set_rand_method()\fR and returned by
186 \&\fIRAND_get_rand_method()\fR, is only used if no \s-1ENGINE\s0 has been set as the default
187 \&\*(L"rand\*(R" implementation. Hence, these two functions are no longer the recommened
188 way to control defaults.
189 .PP
190 If an alternative \fB\s-1RAND_METHOD\s0\fR implementation is being used (either set
191 directly or as provided by an \s-1ENGINE\s0 module), then it is entirely responsible
192 for the generation and management of a cryptographically secure \s-1PRNG\s0 stream. The
193 mechanisms described below relate solely to the software \s-1PRNG\s0 implementation
194 built in to OpenSSL and used by default.
195 .PP
196 These functions implement a cryptographically secure pseudo-random
197 number generator (\s-1PRNG\s0). It is used by other library functions for
198 example to generate random keys, and applications can use it when they
199 need randomness.
200 .PP
201 A cryptographic \s-1PRNG\s0 must be seeded with unpredictable data such as
202 mouse movements or keys pressed at random by the user. This is
203 described in \fIRAND_add\fR\|(3). Its state can be saved in a seed file
204 (see \fIRAND_load_file\fR\|(3)) to avoid having to go through the
205 seeding process whenever the application is started.
206 .PP
207 \&\fIRAND_bytes\fR\|(3) describes how to obtain random data from the
208 \&\s-1PRNG\s0. 
209 .SH "INTERNALS"
210 .IX Header "INTERNALS"
211 The \fIRAND_SSLeay()\fR method implements a \s-1PRNG\s0 based on a cryptographic
212 hash function.
213 .PP
214 The following description of its design is based on the SSLeay
215 documentation:
216 .PP
217 First up I will state the things I believe I need for a good \s-1RNG\s0.
218 .IP "1" 4
219 .IX Item "1"
220 A good hashing algorithm to mix things up and to convert the \s-1RNG\s0 'state'
221 to random numbers.
222 .IP "2" 4
223 .IX Item "2"
224 An initial source of random 'state'.
225 .IP "3" 4
226 .IX Item "3"
227 The state should be very large.  If the \s-1RNG\s0 is being used to generate
228 4096 bit \s-1RSA\s0 keys, 2 2048 bit random strings are required (at a minimum).
229 If your \s-1RNG\s0 state only has 128 bits, you are obviously limiting the
230 search space to 128 bits, not 2048.  I'm probably getting a little
231 carried away on this last point but it does indicate that it may not be
232 a bad idea to keep quite a lot of \s-1RNG\s0 state.  It should be easier to
233 break a cipher than guess the \s-1RNG\s0 seed data.
234 .IP "4" 4
235 .IX Item "4"
236 Any \s-1RNG\s0 seed data should influence all subsequent random numbers
237 generated.  This implies that any random seed data entered will have
238 an influence on all subsequent random numbers generated.
239 .IP "5" 4
240 .IX Item "5"
241 When using data to seed the \s-1RNG\s0 state, the data used should not be
242 extractable from the \s-1RNG\s0 state.  I believe this should be a
243 requirement because one possible source of 'secret' semi random
244 data would be a private key or a password.  This data must
245 not be disclosed by either subsequent random numbers or a
246 \&'core' dump left by a program crash.
247 .IP "6" 4
248 .IX Item "6"
249 Given the same initial 'state', 2 systems should deviate in their \s-1RNG\s0 state
250 (and hence the random numbers generated) over time if at all possible.
251 .IP "7" 4
252 .IX Item "7"
253 Given the random number output stream, it should not be possible to determine
254 the \s-1RNG\s0 state or the next random number.
255 .PP
256 The algorithm is as follows.
257 .PP
258 There is global state made up of a 1023 byte buffer (the 'state'), a
259 working hash value ('md'), and a counter ('count').
260 .PP
261 Whenever seed data is added, it is inserted into the 'state' as
262 follows.
263 .PP
264 The input is chopped up into units of 20 bytes (or less for
265 the last block).  Each of these blocks is run through the hash
266 function as follows:  The data passed to the hash function
267 is the current 'md', the same number of bytes from the 'state'
268 (the location determined by in incremented looping index) as
269 the current 'block', the new key data 'block', and 'count'
270 (which is incremented after each use).
271 The result of this is kept in 'md' and also xored into the
272 \&'state' at the same locations that were used as input into the
273 hash function. I
274 believe this system addresses points 1 (hash function; currently
275 \&\s-1SHA\-1\s0), 3 (the 'state'), 4 (via the 'md'), 5 (by the use of a hash
276 function and xor).
277 .PP
278 When bytes are extracted from the \s-1RNG\s0, the following process is used.
279 For each group of 10 bytes (or less), we do the following:
280 .PP
281 Input into the hash function the local 'md' (which is initialized from
282 the global 'md' before any bytes are generated), the bytes that are to
283 be overwritten by the random bytes, and bytes from the 'state'
284 (incrementing looping index). From this digest output (which is kept
285 in 'md'), the top (up to) 10 bytes are returned to the caller and the
286 bottom 10 bytes are xored into the 'state'.
287 .PP
288 Finally, after we have finished 'num' random bytes for the caller,
289 \&'count' (which is incremented) and the local and global 'md' are fed
290 into the hash function and the results are kept in the global 'md'.
291 .PP
292 I believe the above addressed points 1 (use of \s-1SHA\-1\s0), 6 (by hashing
293 into the 'state' the 'old' data from the caller that is about to be
294 overwritten) and 7 (by not using the 10 bytes given to the caller to
295 update the 'state', but they are used to update 'md').
296 .PP
297 So of the points raised, only 2 is not addressed (but see
298 \&\fIRAND_add\fR\|(3)).
299 .SH "SEE ALSO"
300 .IX Header "SEE ALSO"
301 \&\fIBN_rand\fR\|(3), \fIRAND_add\fR\|(3),
302 \&\fIRAND_load_file\fR\|(3), \fIRAND_egd\fR\|(3),
303 \&\fIRAND_bytes\fR\|(3),
304 \&\fIRAND_set_rand_method\fR\|(3),
305 \&\fIRAND_cleanup\fR\|(3)