1b5ad0ea78ffc53644f176dde530db212a07d058
[dragonfly.git] / en / books / usersguide / backups / chapter.sgml
1 <!-- 
2 $DragonFly: doc/en/books/usersguide/backups/chapter.sgml,v 1.1 2004/05/05 18:38:57 justin Exp $
3 -->
4 <chapter id="backups">
5   <chapterinfo>
6     <authorgroup>
7       <author>
8         <firstname>Justin</firstname>
9         <surname>Sherrill</surname>
10         <contrib>Contributed by </contrib>
11       </author> <!-- justin@dragonflybsd.org  29 May 2004 -->
12     </authorgroup>
13   </chapterinfo>
14   <title>Backups</title>
15
16   <sect1 id="backups-synopsis">
17     <title>Backups Overview</title>
18       <para>If you are looking to save a relatively small number of files, 
19       you can use 
20         <citerefentry>
21           <refentrytitle>tar</refentrytitle>
22           <manvolnum>1</manvolnum>
23         </citerefentry> to concatenate multiple files into a single archive.  
24       Optionally, then use a utility like 
25         <citerefentry>
26           <refentrytitle>gzip</refentrytitle>
27           <manvolnum>1</manvolnum>
28         </citerefentry> (compresses faster) or 
29         <citerefentry>
30           <refentrytitle>bzip2</refentrytitle>
31           <manvolnum>1</manvolnum>
32         </citerefentry> (compresses smaller) to save on disk space or bandwidth used.  
33       Save the resulting file somewhere other than on the disk that contains the 
34       original files.</para>
35
36       <para>This works for grouped, similar data like mail files, but will 
37       not work on special files, or whole filesystems, or handle incremental 
38       backups.  For this, the tools 
39         <citerefentry>
40           <refentrytitle>dump</refentrytitle>
41           <manvolnum>8</manvolnum>
42         </citerefentry> and 
43         <citerefentry>
44           <refentrytitle>restore</refentrytitle>
45           <manvolnum>8</manvolnum>
46         </citerefentry>
47       will handle almost 
48       any eventuality.  <command>dump()</command> will copy a complete filesystem to the location 
49       specified; <command>restore()</command> will replace that filesystem into a completely 
50       clean partition.  It is possible to completely reformat a hard drive that 
51       has been backed up with <command>dump()</command>, and then use 
52       <command>restore()</command> to bring that drive 
53       back completely to its original state.</para>
54   </sect1>
55
56   <sect1 id="backups-media">
57     <title>Backups Media</title>
58       <para>The "classical" method of data storage has always been tape drives.  
59       A number of SCSI and IDE tape drives are supported under DragonFly; no 
60       compatibility list exists at this point, though devices supported on 
61       FreeBSD-4 should work.  Tape backup has several advantages: it is stable, 
62       relatively cheap, and can hold a large quantity of data.  However, tape 
63       media is accessed in linear fashion, and so it can take some time to 
64       retrieve data.</para>
65
66       <para>More recently, recordable optical media have become a viable option for 
67       backup media.  The shelf life and price per megabyte of saved data is not 
68       as great as tape (as of this writing), but the recording equipment is 
69       relatively common for creating CDs, and becoming more so for DVDs.<!--  Check 
70       the "Recording media" section (FIXME: insert link to desktop/recording media) 
71       for more information on burning CDs and DVDs.--></para>
72
73       <para>A third media option is hard drives.  While these are not as cheap as tape or 
74       blank optical media, they offer the ability, when mounted, to instantly 
75       access data, or to update existing records.</para>
76
77       <para>Whichever option is picked, the backup media, once filled, should be stored 
78       in a location physically separated from the source data.  Time invested in 
79       backups is wasted if the backups can be lost in the same accident that 
80       destroys the original data.</para>
81   </sect1>
82   
83   <sect1 id="backups-automating">
84     <title>Automating backups</title> 
85       <para>If you are performing relatively simple backups to a network location, it's 
86       easy enough to use 
87         <citerefentry>
88           <refentrytitle>cron</refentrytitle>
89           <manvolnum>8</manvolnum>
90         </citerefentry> to schedule regular backup events.  For more 
91       complex situtations, there are ports available such as 
92       <filename role="package">misc/amanda</filename> or 
93       <filename role="package">sysutils/bacula</filename>.</para>
94   </sect1>
95
96 </chapter>