committer(7): Add some lines about MFCing.
[dragonfly.git] / share / man / man7 / committer.7
1 .\" Copyright (c) 2003,2004 The DragonFly Project.  All rights reserved.
2 .\" 
3 .\" This code is derived from software contributed to The DragonFly Project
4 .\" by Matthew Dillon <dillon@backplane.com>
5 .\" 
6 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
7 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
8 .\" are met:
9 .\" 
10 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
11 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
12 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
13 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in
14 .\"    the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
15 .\"    distribution.
16 .\" 3. Neither the name of The DragonFly Project nor the names of its
17 .\"    contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived
18 .\"    from this software without specific, prior written permission.
19 .\" 
20 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS
21 .\" ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT
22 .\" LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS
23 .\" FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
24 .\" COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
25 .\" INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING,
26 .\" BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;
27 .\" LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED
28 .\" AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY,
29 .\" OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT
30 .\" OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
31 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
32 .\" 
33 .\" $DragonFly: src/share/man/man7/committer.7,v 1.11 2008/05/02 02:05:06 swildner Exp $
34 .\" 
35 .Dd February 22, 2009
36 .Dt COMMITTER 7
37 .Os
38 .Sh NAME
39 .Nm committer
40 .Nd rules for DragonFly committers
41 .Sh GIT REPOSITORY ON YOUR LOCAL MACHINE
42 See
43 .Xr development 7
44 how to obtain a fresh copy of the
45 .Dx
46 git repository on your machine.
47 Note that all developers have to pull/push through
48 .Xr ssh 1 .
49 Your
50 .Pa ~/.gitconfig
51 should contain at least:
52 .Bd -literal -offset indent
53 [user]
54         name = Your Name
55         email = <login>@dragonflybsd.org
56 .Ed
57 .Pp
58 Alternatively, see the
59 .Va user.name
60 and
61 .Va user.email
62 variables in
63 .Xr git-config 1 .
64 .Sh SSH DSA KEYS
65 The git repository machine is
66 .Pa crater.dragonflybsd.org ,
67 and the
68 .Dx
69 developer machine is
70 .Pa leaf.dragonflybsd.org .
71 We create
72 an account for you on both machines and install your public SSH
73 key to give you access.
74 .Pp
75 Your
76 .Pa crater
77 account is set up for git repository only.
78 It can only operate as a git slave and cannot be logged into.
79 That is,
80 .Pa crater.dragonflybsd.org
81 is only used as part of
82 .Nm git Cm push
83 operations.
84 .Pp
85 Your
86 .Pa leaf
87 account is a general developer account.
88 Any
89 .Dx
90 developer can have a
91 .Pa leaf
92 account, whether a committer or not.
93 It can be useful as a developer rendezvous,
94 however.
95 For example, people upload kernel cores to
96 .Pa leaf
97 so other
98 developers can look at them.
99 You log into your
100 .Pa leaf
101 account with:
102 .Bd -literal -offset indent
103 ssh you@leaf.dragonflybsd.org
104 .Ed
105 .Pp
106 The rules for account use are in
107 .Pa leaf Ap s
108 MOTD.
109 It is very important that you never install a password or create a SSH
110 key pair on
111 .Pa leaf
112 to use to access other machines.
113 Because non-committers can have
114 .Pa leaf
115 accounts,
116 .Pa leaf
117 is not considered a secure machine.
118 .Sh TESTING COMMIT ACCESS
119 There is a directory called
120 .Pa /usr/src/test/test .
121 To test your commit
122 access, try making a modification and committing a file in this
123 directory.
124 Try to push the commit to
125 .Pa crater
126 afterwards.
127 .Bd -literal -offset indent
128 cd /usr/src/test/test
129 (edit something)
130 git commit file_you_edited
131 git push crater
132 .Ed
133 .Sh COMMITTING REAL WORK
134 Make modifications as needed.
135 For example, edit files.
136 If adding new files make git aware of them like this.
137 Files and directories can just be added locally.
138 These operations do not actually affect the master repository.
139 Instead they are stored in your local copy of the repository and then
140 synchronized to the repository when you
141 .Nm git Cm push .
142 .Bd -literal -offset indent
143 git add filename
144 git commit filename
145 .Ed
146 .Pp
147 To actually push your changes to the the repository on
148 .Pa crater ,
149 use:
150 .Bd -literal -offset indent
151 git push crater
152 .Ed
153 .Pp
154 To merge bug fixes to other branches (MFC), use
155 .Nm git Cm cherry-pick :
156 .Bd -literal -offset indent
157 git checkout -b rel2_2 crater/DragonFly_RELEASE_2_2
158 git cherry-pick <commit>...
159 git push crater rel2_2:DragonFly_RELEASE_2_2
160 .Ed
161 .Pp
162 Do not set the default remote tag to
163 .Pa origin .
164 It is set to
165 .Pa crater
166 by default.
167 This reduces instances where accidental commits or repository
168 operations are made on the master repository.
169 .Sh STRUCTURE OF COMMIT MESSAGES
170 As many
171 .Xr git 1
172 tools display the first line of a commit message as a summary,
173 structure your commit messages like this, if possible:
174 .Bd -literal -offset indent
175 One line summary of your change.
176
177 Maybe more text here describing your changes in detail (including
178 issue tracker id's etc).
179 .Ed
180 .Sh DISCUSSING COMMITTABLE WORK BEFOREHAND
181 Discussion prior to committing usually occurs on the
182 .Pa kernel@ ,
183 .Pa submit@ ,
184 or
185 .Pa bugs@
186 mailing lists and depends on the work involved.
187 Simple and obvious work such as documentation edits or additions,
188 doesn't really need a heads up.
189 .Pp
190 Simple and obvious bug fixes don't need a heads up either, other than to
191 say that you will (or just have) committed the fix, so you don't
192 race other committers trying to do the same thing.
193 Usually the developer most active in a discussion about a bug commits the
194 fix, but it isn't considered a big deal.
195 .Pp
196 More complex issues are usually discussed on the lists first.
197 Non-trivial but straight forward bug fixes usually go through
198 a testing period, where you say something like:
199 .Do
200 Here is a patch
201 to driver BLAH that fixes A, B, and C, please test it.
202 If there are no objections I will commit it next Tuesday.
203 .Dc
204 (usually a week,
205 or more depending on the complexity of the patch).
206 .Pp
207 New drivers or utilities are usually discussed.
208 Committers will often commit new work
209 .Em without
210 hooking it into the buildworld or
211 buildkernel infrastructure in order to be able to continue
212 development on it in piecemeal without having to worry about it
213 breaking buildworld or buildkernel, and then they hook it in as a
214 last step after they've stabilized it.
215 Examples of this include
216 new versions of GCC, updates to vendor packages such as bind,
217 sendmail, etc.
218 .Sh SOURCE OWNERSHIP
219 Areas within the repository do not
220 .Dq belong
221 to any committer.
222 Often situations will arise where one developer commits work and
223 another developer finds an issue with it that needs to be corrected.
224 .Pp
225 All committed work becomes community property.
226 No developer has a
227 .Dq lock
228 on any part of the source tree.
229 However, if a developer is
230 actively working on a portion of the source tree and you find a bug
231 or other issue, courtesy dictates that you post to
232 .Pa kernel@
233 and/or email the developer.
234 .Pp
235 This means that, generally, if you do not see a commit to an area
236 of the source tree in the last few weeks, it isn't considered active and
237 you don't really need to confer with the developer that made the
238 commit, though you should still post to the
239 .Pa kernel@
240 mailing list and, of course, confer with developers when their expertise
241 is needed.
242 .Pp
243 One exception to this rule is documentation.
244 If any developer commits
245 new work, the documentation guys have free reign to go in and correct
246 .Xr mdoc 7
247 errors.
248 This is really a convenience as most developers are not
249 .Xr mdoc 7
250 gurus and it's a waste of time for the doc guys to post to
251 .Pa kernel@
252 for all the little corrections they make.
253 .Sh CONFLICTS
254 On the occasion that a major code conflict occurs, for example if two
255 people are doing major work in the same area of the source tree and forgot
256 to collaborate with each other, the project leader will be responsible for
257 resolving the conflict.
258 Again, the repository is considered community
259 property and it must be acceptable for any developer to be able to work on
260 any area of the tree that he or she has an interest in.
261 .Sh MAJOR ARCHITECTURAL CHANGES
262 This is generally
263 .An Matt Dillon Ap s
264 area of expertise.
265 All major architectural changes must be discussed on the
266 .Pa kernel@
267 mailing list and he retains veto power.
268 .Pp
269 This isn't usually an issue with any work.
270 At best if something
271 doesn't look right architecturally he'll chip in with adjustments to
272 make it fit in.
273 Nothing ever really gets vetoed.
274 .Sh SEE ALSO
275 .Xr git 1 Pq Pa pkgsrc/devel/scmgit ,
276 .Xr development 7