Merge branch 'vendor/GCC44'
[dragonfly.git] / bin / sh / sh.1
1 .\"-
2 .\" Copyright (c) 1991, 1993
3 .\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
4 .\"
5 .\" This code is derived from software contributed to Berkeley by
6 .\" Kenneth Almquist.
7 .\"
8 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
9 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
10 .\" are met:
11 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
12 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
13 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
14 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
15 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
16 .\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
17 .\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
18 .\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
19 .\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
20 .\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
21 .\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
22 .\"    without specific prior written permission.
23 .\"
24 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
25 .\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
26 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
27 .\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
28 .\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
29 .\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
30 .\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
31 .\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
32 .\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
33 .\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
34 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
35 .\"
36 .\"     from: @(#)sh.1  8.6 (Berkeley) 5/4/95
37 .\" $FreeBSD: src/bin/sh/sh.1,v 1.175 2011/11/05 21:56:45 jilles Exp $
38 .\"
39 .Dd December 25, 2011
40 .Dt SH 1
41 .Os
42 .Sh NAME
43 .Nm sh
44 .Nd command interpreter (shell)
45 .Sh SYNOPSIS
46 .Nm
47 .Op Fl /+abCEefIimnPpTuVvx
48 .Op Fl /+o Ar longname
49 .Oo
50 .Ar script
51 .Op Ar arg ...
52 .Oc
53 .Nm
54 .Op Fl /+abCEefIimnPpTuVvx
55 .Op Fl /+o Ar longname
56 .Fl c Ar string
57 .Oo
58 .Ar name
59 .Op Ar arg ...
60 .Oc
61 .Nm
62 .Op Fl /+abCEefIimnPpTuVvx
63 .Op Fl /+o Ar longname
64 .Fl s
65 .Op Ar arg ...
66 .Sh DESCRIPTION
67 The
68 .Nm
69 utility is the standard command interpreter for the system.
70 The current version of
71 .Nm
72 is close to the
73 .St -p1003.1
74 specification for the shell.
75 It only supports features
76 designated by
77 .Tn POSIX ,
78 plus a few Berkeley extensions.
79 This man page is not intended to be a tutorial nor a complete
80 specification of the shell.
81 .Ss Overview
82 The shell is a command that reads lines from
83 either a file or the terminal, interprets them, and
84 generally executes other commands.
85 It is the program that is started when a user logs into the system,
86 although a user can select a different shell with the
87 .Xr chsh 1
88 command.
89 The shell
90 implements a language that has flow control constructs,
91 a macro facility that provides a variety of features in
92 addition to data storage, along with built-in history and line
93 editing capabilities.
94 It incorporates many features to
95 aid interactive use and has the advantage that the interpretative
96 language is common to both interactive and non-interactive
97 use (shell scripts).
98 That is, commands can be typed directly
99 to the running shell or can be put into a file,
100 which can be executed directly by the shell.
101 .Ss Invocation
102 .\"
103 .\" XXX This next sentence is incredibly confusing.
104 .\"
105 If no arguments are present and if the standard input of the shell
106 is connected to a terminal
107 (or if the
108 .Fl i
109 option is set),
110 the shell is considered an interactive shell.
111 An interactive shell
112 generally prompts before each command and handles programming
113 and command errors differently (as described below).
114 When first starting, the shell inspects argument 0, and
115 if it begins with a dash
116 .Pq Ql - ,
117 the shell is also considered a login shell.
118 This is normally done automatically by the system
119 when the user first logs in.
120 A login shell first reads commands
121 from the files
122 .Pa /etc/profile
123 and then
124 .Pa .profile
125 in a user's home directory,
126 if they exist.
127 If the environment variable
128 .Ev ENV
129 is set on entry to a shell, or is set in the
130 .Pa .profile
131 of a login shell, the shell then subjects its value to parameter expansion
132 and arithmetic expansion and reads commands from the named file.
133 Therefore, a user should place commands that are to be executed only
134 at login time in the
135 .Pa .profile
136 file, and commands that are executed for every shell inside the
137 .Ev ENV
138 file.
139 The user can set the
140 .Ev ENV
141 variable to some file by placing the following line in the file
142 .Pa .profile
143 in the home directory,
144 substituting for
145 .Pa .shinit
146 the filename desired:
147 .Pp
148 .Dl "ENV=$HOME/.shinit; export ENV"
149 .Pp
150 The first non-option argument specified on the command line
151 will be treated as the
152 name of a file from which to read commands (a shell script), and
153 the remaining arguments are set as the positional parameters
154 of the shell
155 .Li ( $1 , $2 ,
156 etc.).
157 Otherwise, the shell reads commands
158 from its standard input.
159 .Pp
160 Unlike older versions of
161 .Nm
162 the
163 .Ev ENV
164 script is only sourced on invocation of interactive shells.
165 This
166 closes a well-known, and sometimes easily exploitable security
167 hole related to poorly thought out
168 .Ev ENV
169 scripts.
170 .Ss Argument List Processing
171 All of the single letter options to
172 .Nm
173 have a corresponding long name,
174 with the exception of
175 .Fl c
176 and
177 .Fl /+o .
178 These long names are provided next to the single letter options
179 in the descriptions below.
180 The long name for an option may be specified as an argument to the
181 .Fl /+o
182 option of
183 .Nm .
184 Once the shell is running,
185 the long name for an option may be specified as an argument to the
186 .Fl /+o
187 option of the
188 .Ic set
189 built-in command
190 (described later in the section called
191 .Sx Built-in Commands ) .
192 Introducing an option with a dash
193 .Pq Ql -
194 enables the option,
195 while using a plus
196 .Pq Ql +
197 disables the option.
198 A
199 .Dq Li --
200 or plain
201 .Ql -
202 will stop option processing and will force the remaining
203 words on the command line to be treated as arguments.
204 The
205 .Fl /+o
206 and
207 .Fl c
208 options do not have long names.
209 They take arguments and are described after the single letter options.
210 .Bl -tag -width indent
211 .It Fl a Li allexport
212 Flag variables for export when assignments are made to them.
213 .It Fl b Li notify
214 Enable asynchronous notification of background job
215 completion.
216 (UNIMPLEMENTED)
217 .It Fl C Li noclobber
218 Do not overwrite existing files with
219 .Ql > .
220 .It Fl E Li emacs
221 Enable the built-in
222 .Xr emacs 1
223 command line editor (disables the
224 .Fl V
225 option if it has been set;
226 set automatically when interactive on terminals).
227 .It Fl e Li errexit
228 Exit immediately if any untested command fails in non-interactive mode.
229 The exit status of a command is considered to be
230 explicitly tested if the command is part of the list used to control
231 an
232 .Ic if , elif , while ,
233 or
234 .Ic until ;
235 if the command is the left
236 hand operand of an
237 .Dq Li &&
238 or
239 .Dq Li ||
240 operator; or if the command is a pipeline preceded by the
241 .Ic !\&
242 operator.
243 If a shell function is executed and its exit status is explicitly
244 tested, all commands of the function are considered to be tested as
245 well.
246 .It Fl f Li noglob
247 Disable pathname expansion.
248 .It Fl h Li trackall
249 A do-nothing option for
250 .Tn POSIX
251 compliance.
252 .It Fl I Li ignoreeof
253 Ignore
254 .Dv EOF Ap s
255 from input when in interactive mode.
256 .It Fl i Li interactive
257 Force the shell to behave interactively.
258 .It Fl m Li monitor
259 Turn on job control (set automatically when interactive).
260 .It Fl n Li noexec
261 If not interactive, read commands but do not
262 execute them.
263 This is useful for checking the
264 syntax of shell scripts.
265 .It Fl P Li physical
266 Change the default for the
267 .Ic cd
268 and
269 .Ic pwd
270 commands from
271 .Fl L
272 (logical directory layout)
273 to
274 .Fl P
275 (physical directory layout).
276 .It Fl p Li privileged
277 Turn on privileged mode.
278 This mode is enabled on startup
279 if either the effective user or group ID is not equal to the
280 real user or group ID.
281 Turning this mode off sets the
282 effective user and group IDs to the real user and group IDs.
283 When this mode is enabled for interactive shells, the file
284 .Pa /etc/suid_profile
285 is sourced instead of
286 .Pa ~/.profile
287 after
288 .Pa /etc/profile
289 is sourced, and the contents of the
290 .Ev ENV
291 variable are ignored.
292 .It Fl s Li stdin
293 Read commands from standard input (set automatically
294 if no file arguments are present).
295 This option has
296 no effect when set after the shell has already started
297 running (i.e., when set with the
298 .Ic set
299 command).
300 .It Fl T Li trapsasync
301 When waiting for a child, execute traps immediately.
302 If this option is not set,
303 traps are executed after the child exits,
304 as specified in
305 .St -p1003.2 .
306 This nonstandard option is useful for putting guarding shells around
307 children that block signals.
308 The surrounding shell may kill the child
309 or it may just return control to the tty and leave the child alone,
310 like this:
311 .Bd -literal -offset indent
312 sh -T -c "trap 'exit 1' 2 ; some-blocking-program"
313 .Ed
314 .It Fl u Li nounset
315 Write a message to standard error when attempting
316 to expand a variable, a positional parameter or
317 the special parameter
318 .Va \&!
319 that is not set, and if the
320 shell is not interactive, exit immediately.
321 .It Fl V Li vi
322 Enable the built-in
323 .Xr vi 1
324 command line editor (disables
325 .Fl E
326 if it has been set).
327 .It Fl v Li verbose
328 The shell writes its input to standard error
329 as it is read.
330 Useful for debugging.
331 .It Fl x Li xtrace
332 Write each command
333 (preceded by the value of the
334 .Va PS4
335 variable subjected to parameter expansion and arithmetic expansion)
336 to standard error before it is executed.
337 Useful for debugging.
338 .It "\ \ " Em tabcomplete
339 Enables filename completion in the command line editor.
340 Typing a tab character will extend the current input word to match a
341 filename.
342 If more than one filename matches it is only extended to be the common prefix.
343 Typing a second tab character will list all the matching names.
344 Turned on by default in an interactive shell.
345 .El
346 .Pp
347 The
348 .Fl c
349 option causes the commands to be read from the
350 .Ar string
351 operand instead of from the standard input.
352 Keep in mind that this option only accepts a single string as its
353 argument, hence multi-word strings must be quoted.
354 .Pp
355 The
356 .Fl /+o
357 option takes as its only argument the long name of an option
358 to be enabled or disabled.
359 For example, the following two invocations of
360 .Nm
361 both enable the built-in
362 .Xr emacs 1
363 command line editor:
364 .Bd -literal -offset indent
365 set -E
366 set -o emacs
367 .Ed
368 .Pp
369 If used without an argument, the
370 .Fl o
371 option displays the current option settings in a human-readable format.
372 If
373 .Cm +o
374 is used without an argument, the current option settings are output
375 in a format suitable for re-input into the shell.
376 .Ss Lexical Structure
377 The shell reads input in terms of lines from a file and breaks
378 it up into words at whitespace (blanks and tabs), and at
379 certain sequences of
380 characters called
381 .Dq operators ,
382 which are special to the shell.
383 There are two types of operators: control operators and
384 redirection operators (their meaning is discussed later).
385 The following is a list of valid operators:
386 .Bl -tag -width indent
387 .It Control operators:
388 .Bl -column "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" -offset center -compact
389 .It Li & Ta Li && Ta Li ( Ta Li ) Ta Li \en
390 .It Li ;; Ta Li ;& Ta Li ; Ta Li | Ta Li ||
391 .El
392 .It Redirection operators:
393 .Bl -column "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" -offset center -compact
394 .It Li < Ta Li > Ta Li << Ta Li >> Ta Li <>
395 .It Li <& Ta Li >& Ta Li <<- Ta Li >|
396 .El
397 .El
398 .Pp
399 The character
400 .Ql #
401 introduces a comment if used at the beginning of a word.
402 The word starting with
403 .Ql #
404 and the rest of the line are ignored.
405 .Pp
406 .Tn ASCII
407 .Dv NUL
408 characters (character code 0) are not allowed in shell input.
409 .Ss Quoting
410 Quoting is used to remove the special meaning of certain characters
411 or words to the shell, such as operators, whitespace, keywords,
412 or alias names.
413 .Pp
414 There are four types of quoting: matched single quotes,
415 dollar-single quotes,
416 matched double quotes, and backslash.
417 .Bl -tag -width indent
418 .It Single Quotes
419 Enclosing characters in single quotes preserves the literal
420 meaning of all the characters (except single quotes, making
421 it impossible to put single-quotes in a single-quoted string).
422 .It Dollar-Single Quotes
423 Enclosing characters between
424 .Li $'
425 and
426 .Li '
427 preserves the literal meaning of all characters
428 except backslashes and single quotes.
429 A backslash introduces a C-style escape sequence:
430 .Bl -tag -width xUnnnnnnnn
431 .It \ea
432 Alert (ring the terminal bell)
433 .It \eb
434 Backspace
435 .It \ec Ns Ar c
436 The control character denoted by
437 .Li ^ Ns Ar c
438 in
439 .Xr stty 1 .
440 If
441 .Ar c
442 is a backslash, it must be doubled.
443 .It \ee
444 The ESC character
445 .Tn ( ASCII
446 0x1b)
447 .It \ef
448 Formfeed
449 .It \en
450 Newline
451 .It \er
452 Carriage return
453 .It \et
454 Horizontal tab
455 .It \ev
456 Vertical tab
457 .It \e\e
458 Literal backslash
459 .It \e\&'
460 Literal single-quote
461 .It \e\&"
462 Literal double-quote
463 .It \e Ns Ar nnn
464 The byte whose octal value is
465 .Ar nnn
466 (one to three digits)
467 .It \ex Ns Ar nn
468 The byte whose hexadecimal value is
469 .Ar nn
470 (one or more digits only the last two of which are used)
471 .It \eu Ns Ar nnnn
472 The Unicode code point
473 .Ar nnnn
474 (four hexadecimal digits)
475 .It \eU Ns Ar nnnnnnnn
476 The Unicode code point
477 .Ar nnnnnnnn
478 (eight hexadecimal digits)
479 .El
480 .Pp
481 The sequences for Unicode code points are currently only useful with
482 UTF-8 locales.
483 They reject code point 0 and UTF-16 surrogates.
484 .Pp
485 If an escape sequence would produce a byte with value 0,
486 that byte and the rest of the string until the matching single-quote
487 are ignored.
488 .Pp
489 Any other string starting with a backslash is an error.
490 .It Double Quotes
491 Enclosing characters within double quotes preserves the literal
492 meaning of all characters except dollar sign
493 .Pq Ql $ ,
494 backquote
495 .Pq Ql ` ,
496 and backslash
497 .Pq Ql \e .
498 The backslash inside double quotes is historically weird.
499 It remains literal unless it precedes the following characters,
500 which it serves to quote:
501 .Bl -column "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" "XXX" -offset center -compact
502 .It Li $ Ta Li ` Ta Li \&" Ta Li \e\  Ta Li \en
503 .El
504 .It Backslash
505 A backslash preserves the literal meaning of the following
506 character, with the exception of the newline character
507 .Pq Ql \en .
508 A backslash preceding a newline is treated as a line continuation.
509 .El
510 .Ss Keywords
511 Keywords or reserved words are words that have special meaning to the
512 shell and are recognized at the beginning of a line and
513 after a control operator.
514 The following are keywords:
515 .Bl -column "doneXX" "elifXX" "elseXX" "untilXX" "whileX" -offset center
516 .It Li \&! Ta { Ta } Ta Ic case Ta Ic do
517 .It Ic done Ta Ic elif Ta Ic else Ta Ic esac Ta Ic fi
518 .It Ic for Ta Ic if Ta Ic then Ta Ic until Ta Ic while
519 .El
520 .Ss Aliases
521 An alias is a name and corresponding value set using the
522 .Ic alias
523 built-in command.
524 Wherever the command word of a simple command may occur,
525 and after checking for keywords if a keyword may occur, the shell
526 checks the word to see if it matches an alias.
527 If it does, it replaces it in the input stream with its value.
528 For example, if there is an alias called
529 .Dq Li lf
530 with the value
531 .Dq Li "ls -F" ,
532 then the input
533 .Pp
534 .Dl "lf foobar"
535 .Pp
536 would become
537 .Pp
538 .Dl "ls -F foobar"
539 .Pp
540 Aliases provide a convenient way for naive users to
541 create shorthands for commands without having to learn how
542 to create functions with arguments.
543 Using aliases in scripts is discouraged
544 because the command that defines them must be executed
545 before the code that uses them is parsed.
546 This is fragile and not portable.
547 .Pp
548 An alias name may be escaped in a command line, so that it is not
549 replaced by its alias value, by using quoting characters within or
550 adjacent to the alias name.
551 This is most often done by prefixing
552 an alias name with a backslash to execute a function, built-in, or
553 normal program with the same name.
554 See the
555 .Sx Quoting
556 subsection.
557 .Ss Commands
558 The shell interprets the words it reads according to a
559 language, the specification of which is outside the scope
560 of this man page (refer to the BNF in the
561 .St -p1003.2
562 document).
563 Essentially though, a line is read and if
564 the first word of the line (or after a control operator)
565 is not a keyword, then the shell has recognized a
566 simple command.
567 Otherwise, a complex command or some
568 other special construct may have been recognized.
569 .Ss Simple Commands
570 If a simple command has been recognized, the shell performs
571 the following actions:
572 .Bl -enum
573 .It
574 Leading words of the form
575 .Dq Li name=value
576 are stripped off and assigned to the environment of
577 the simple command.
578 Redirection operators and
579 their arguments (as described below) are stripped
580 off and saved for processing.
581 .It
582 The remaining words are expanded as described in
583 the section called
584 .Sx Word Expansions ,
585 and the first remaining word is considered the command
586 name and the command is located.
587 The remaining
588 words are considered the arguments of the command.
589 If no command name resulted, then the
590 .Dq Li name=value
591 variable assignments recognized in 1) affect the
592 current shell.
593 .It
594 Redirections are performed as described in
595 the next section.
596 .El
597 .Ss Redirections
598 Redirections are used to change where a command reads its input
599 or sends its output.
600 In general, redirections open, close, or
601 duplicate an existing reference to a file.
602 The overall format
603 used for redirection is:
604 .Pp
605 .D1 Oo Ar n Oc Ar redir-op file
606 .Pp
607 The
608 .Ar redir-op
609 is one of the redirection operators mentioned
610 previously.
611 The following gives some examples of how these
612 operators can be used.
613 Note that stdin and stdout are commonly used abbreviations
614 for standard input and standard output respectively.
615 .Bl -tag -width "1234567890XX" -offset indent
616 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li > Ar file
617 redirect stdout (or file descriptor
618 .Ar n )
619 to
620 .Ar file
621 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li >| Ar file
622 same as above, but override the
623 .Fl C
624 option
625 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li >> Ar file
626 append stdout (or file descriptor
627 .Ar n )
628 to
629 .Ar file
630 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li < Ar file
631 redirect stdin (or file descriptor
632 .Ar n )
633 from
634 .Ar file
635 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li <> Ar file
636 redirect stdin (or file descriptor
637 .Ar n )
638 to and from
639 .Ar file
640 .It Oo Ar n1 Oc Ns Li <& Ns Ar n2
641 duplicate stdin (or file descriptor
642 .Ar n1 )
643 from file descriptor
644 .Ar n2
645 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li <&-
646 close stdin (or file descriptor
647 .Ar n )
648 .It Oo Ar n1 Oc Ns Li >& Ns Ar n2
649 duplicate stdout (or file descriptor
650 .Ar n1 )
651 to file descriptor
652 .Ar n2
653 .It Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li >&-
654 close stdout (or file descriptor
655 .Ar n )
656 .El
657 .Pp
658 The following redirection is often called a
659 .Dq here-document .
660 .Bd -unfilled -offset indent
661 .Oo Ar n Oc Ns Li << Ar delimiter
662 .D1 Ar here-doc-text
663 .D1 ...
664 .Ar delimiter
665 .Ed
666 .Pp
667 All the text on successive lines up to the delimiter is
668 saved away and made available to the command on standard
669 input, or file descriptor
670 .Ar n
671 if it is specified.
672 If the
673 .Ar delimiter
674 as specified on the initial line is quoted, then the
675 .Ar here-doc-text
676 is treated literally, otherwise the text is subjected to
677 parameter expansion, command substitution, and arithmetic
678 expansion (as described in the section on
679 .Sx Word Expansions ) .
680 If the operator is
681 .Dq Li <<-
682 instead of
683 .Dq Li << ,
684 then leading tabs
685 in the
686 .Ar here-doc-text
687 are stripped.
688 .Ss Search and Execution
689 There are three types of commands: shell functions,
690 built-in commands, and normal programs.
691 The command is searched for (by name) in that order.
692 The three types of commands are all executed in a different way.
693 .Pp
694 When a shell function is executed, all of the shell positional
695 parameters (except
696 .Li $0 ,
697 which remains unchanged) are
698 set to the arguments of the shell function.
699 The variables which are explicitly placed in the environment of
700 the command (by placing assignments to them before the
701 function name) are made local to the function and are set
702 to the values given.
703 Then the command given in the function definition is executed.
704 The positional parameters are restored to their original values
705 when the command completes.
706 This all occurs within the current shell.
707 .Pp
708 Shell built-in commands are executed internally to the shell, without
709 spawning a new process.
710 There are two kinds of built-in commands: regular and special.
711 Assignments before special builtins persist after they finish
712 executing and assignment errors, redirection errors and certain
713 operand errors cause a script to be aborted.
714 Special builtins cannot be overridden with a function.
715 Both regular and special builtins can affect the shell in ways
716 normal programs cannot.
717 .Pp
718 Otherwise, if the command name does not match a function
719 or built-in command, the command is searched for as a normal
720 program in the file system (as described in the next section).
721 When a normal program is executed, the shell runs the program,
722 passing the arguments and the environment to the program.
723 If the program is not a normal executable file
724 (i.e., if it does not begin with the
725 .Dq "magic number"
726 whose
727 .Tn ASCII
728 representation is
729 .Dq Li #! ,
730 resulting in an
731 .Er ENOEXEC
732 return value from
733 .Xr execve 2 )
734 but appears to be a text file,
735 the shell will run a new instance of
736 .Nm
737 to interpret it.
738 .Pp
739 Note that previous versions of this document
740 and the source code itself misleadingly and sporadically
741 refer to a shell script without a magic number
742 as a
743 .Dq "shell procedure" .
744 .Ss Path Search
745 When locating a command, the shell first looks to see if
746 it has a shell function by that name.
747 Then it looks for a
748 built-in command by that name.
749 If a built-in command is not found,
750 one of two things happen:
751 .Bl -enum
752 .It
753 Command names containing a slash are simply executed without
754 performing any searches.
755 .It
756 The shell searches each entry in the
757 .Va PATH
758 variable
759 in turn for the command.
760 The value of the
761 .Va PATH
762 variable should be a series of
763 entries separated by colons.
764 Each entry consists of a
765 directory name.
766 The current directory
767 may be indicated implicitly by an empty directory name,
768 or explicitly by a single period.
769 .El
770 .Ss Command Exit Status
771 Each command has an exit status that can influence the behavior
772 of other shell commands.
773 The paradigm is that a command exits
774 with zero for normal or success, and non-zero for failure,
775 error, or a false indication.
776 The man page for each command
777 should indicate the various exit codes and what they mean.
778 Additionally, the built-in commands return exit codes, as does
779 an executed shell function.
780 .Pp
781 If a command is terminated by a signal, its exit status is 128 plus
782 the signal number.
783 Signal numbers are defined in the header file
784 .In sys/signal.h .
785 .Ss Complex Commands
786 Complex commands are combinations of simple commands
787 with control operators or keywords, together creating a larger complex
788 command.
789 More generally, a command is one of the following:
790 .Bl -item -offset indent
791 .It
792 simple command
793 .It
794 pipeline
795 .It
796 list or compound-list
797 .It
798 compound command
799 .It
800 function definition
801 .El
802 .Pp
803 Unless otherwise stated, the exit status of a command is
804 that of the last simple command executed by the command.
805 .Ss Pipelines
806 A pipeline is a sequence of one or more commands separated
807 by the control operator
808 .Ql \&| .
809 The standard output of all but
810 the last command is connected to the standard input
811 of the next command.
812 The standard output of the last
813 command is inherited from the shell, as usual.
814 .Pp
815 The format for a pipeline is:
816 .Pp
817 .D1 Oo Li \&! Oc Ar command1 Op Li \&| Ar command2 ...
818 .Pp
819 The standard output of
820 .Ar command1
821 is connected to the standard input of
822 .Ar command2 .
823 The standard input, standard output, or
824 both of a command is considered to be assigned by the
825 pipeline before any redirection specified by redirection
826 operators that are part of the command.
827 .Pp
828 Note that unlike some other shells,
829 .Nm
830 executes each process in a pipeline with more than one command
831 in a subshell environment and as a child of the
832 .Nm
833 process.
834 .Pp
835 If the pipeline is not in the background (discussed later),
836 the shell waits for all commands to complete.
837 .Pp
838 If the keyword
839 .Ic !\&
840 does not precede the pipeline, the
841 exit status is the exit status of the last command specified
842 in the pipeline.
843 Otherwise, the exit status is the logical
844 NOT of the exit status of the last command.
845 That is, if
846 the last command returns zero, the exit status is 1; if
847 the last command returns greater than zero, the exit status
848 is zero.
849 .Pp
850 Because pipeline assignment of standard input or standard
851 output or both takes place before redirection, it can be
852 modified by redirection.
853 For example:
854 .Pp
855 .Dl "command1 2>&1 | command2"
856 .Pp
857 sends both the standard output and standard error of
858 .Ar command1
859 to the standard input of
860 .Ar command2 .
861 .Pp
862 A
863 .Ql \&;
864 or newline terminator causes the preceding
865 AND-OR-list
866 (described below in the section called
867 .Sx Short-Circuit List Operators )
868 to be executed sequentially;
869 an
870 .Ql &
871 causes asynchronous execution of the preceding AND-OR-list.
872 .Ss Background Commands (&)
873 If a command is terminated by the control operator ampersand
874 .Pq Ql & ,
875 the shell executes the command in a subshell environment (see
876 .Sx Grouping Commands Together
877 below) and asynchronously;
878 the shell does not wait for the command to finish
879 before executing the next command.
880 .Pp
881 The format for running a command in background is:
882 .Pp
883 .D1 Ar command1 Li & Op Ar command2 Li & Ar ...
884 .Pp
885 If the shell is not interactive, the standard input of an
886 asynchronous command is set to
887 .Pa /dev/null .
888 .Ss Lists (Generally Speaking)
889 A list is a sequence of zero or more commands separated by
890 newlines, semicolons, or ampersands,
891 and optionally terminated by one of these three characters.
892 The commands in a
893 list are executed in the order they are written.
894 If command is followed by an ampersand, the shell starts the
895 command and immediately proceeds onto the next command;
896 otherwise it waits for the command to terminate before
897 proceeding to the next one.
898 .Ss Short-Circuit List Operators
899 .Dq Li &&
900 and
901 .Dq Li ||
902 are AND-OR list operators.
903 .Dq Li &&
904 executes the first command, and then executes the second command
905 if the exit status of the first command is zero.
906 .Dq Li ||
907 is similar, but executes the second command if the exit
908 status of the first command is nonzero.
909 .Dq Li &&
910 and
911 .Dq Li ||
912 both have the same priority.
913 .Ss Flow-Control Constructs (if, while, for, case)
914 The syntax of the
915 .Ic if
916 command is:
917 .Bd -unfilled -offset indent -compact
918 .Ic if Ar list
919 .Ic then Ar list
920 .Oo Ic elif Ar list
921 .Ic then Ar list Oc Ar ...
922 .Op Ic else Ar list
923 .Ic fi
924 .Ed
925 .Pp
926 The syntax of the
927 .Ic while
928 command is:
929 .Bd -unfilled -offset indent -compact
930 .Ic while Ar list
931 .Ic do Ar list
932 .Ic done
933 .Ed
934 .Pp
935 The two lists are executed repeatedly while the exit status of the
936 first list is zero.
937 The
938 .Ic until
939 command is similar, but has the word
940 .Ic until
941 in place of
942 .Ic while ,
943 which causes it to
944 repeat until the exit status of the first list is zero.
945 .Pp
946 The syntax of the
947 .Ic for
948 command is:
949 .Bd -unfilled -offset indent -compact
950 .Ic for Ar variable Op Ic in Ar word ...
951 .Ic do Ar list
952 .Ic done
953 .Ed
954 .Pp
955 If
956 .Ic in
957 and the following words are omitted,
958 .Ic in Li \&"$@\&"
959 is used instead.
960 The words are expanded, and then the list is executed
961 repeatedly with the variable set to each word in turn.
962 The
963 .Ic do
964 and
965 .Ic done
966 commands may be replaced with
967 .Ql {
968 and
969 .Ql } .
970 .Pp
971 The syntax of the
972 .Ic break
973 and
974 .Ic continue
975 commands is:
976 .D1 Ic break Op Ar num
977 .D1 Ic continue Op Ar num
978 .Pp
979 The
980 .Ic break
981 command terminates the
982 .Ar num
983 innermost
984 .Ic for
985 or
986 .Ic while
987 loops.
988 The
989 .Ic continue
990 command continues with the next iteration of the innermost loop.
991 These are implemented as special built-in commands.
992 .Pp
993 The syntax of the
994 .Ic case
995 command is:
996 .Bd -unfilled -offset indent -compact
997 .Ic case Ar word Ic in
998 .Ar pattern Ns Li ) Ar list Li ;;
999 .Ar ...
1000 .Ic esac
1001 .Ed
1002 .Pp
1003 The pattern can actually be one or more patterns
1004 (see
1005 .Sx Shell Patterns
1006 described later),
1007 separated by
1008 .Ql \&|
1009 characters.
1010 Tilde expansion, parameter expansion, command substitution,
1011 arithmetic expansion and quote removal are applied to the word.
1012 Then, each pattern is expanded in turn using tilde expansion,
1013 parameter expansion, command substitution and arithmetic expansion and
1014 the expanded form of the word is checked against it.
1015 If a match is found, the corresponding list is executed.
1016 If the selected list is terminated by the control operator
1017 .Ql ;&
1018 instead of
1019 .Ql ;; ,
1020 execution continues with the next list,
1021 continuing until a list terminated with
1022 .Ql ;;
1023 or the end of the
1024 .Ic case
1025 command.
1026 The exit code of the
1027 .Ic case
1028 command is the exit code of the last command executed in the list or
1029 zero if no patterns were matched.
1030 .Ss Grouping Commands Together
1031 Commands may be grouped by writing either
1032 .Pp
1033 .D1 Li \&( Ns Ar list Ns Li \%)
1034 .Pp
1035 or
1036 .Pp
1037 .D1 Li { Ar list Ns Li \&; }
1038 .Pp
1039 The first form executes the commands in a subshell environment.
1040 A subshell environment has its own copy of:
1041 .Bl -enum
1042 .It
1043 The current working directory as set by
1044 .Ic cd .
1045 .It
1046 The file creation mask as set by
1047 .Ic umask .
1048 .It
1049 References to open files.
1050 .It
1051 Traps as set by
1052 .Ic trap .
1053 .It
1054 Known jobs.
1055 .It
1056 Positional parameters and variables.
1057 .It
1058 Shell options.
1059 .It
1060 Shell functions.
1061 .It
1062 Shell aliases.
1063 .El
1064 .Pp
1065 These are copied from the parent shell environment,
1066 except that trapped (but not ignored) signals are reset to the default action
1067 and known jobs are cleared.
1068 Any changes do not affect the parent shell environment.
1069 .Pp
1070 A subshell environment may be implemented as a child process or differently.
1071 If job control is enabled in an interactive shell,
1072 commands grouped in parentheses can be suspended and continued as a unit.
1073 .Pp
1074 The second form never forks another shell,
1075 so it is slightly more efficient.
1076 Grouping commands together this way allows the user to
1077 redirect their output as though they were one program:
1078 .Bd -literal -offset indent
1079 { echo -n "hello"; echo " world"; } > greeting
1080 .Ed
1081 .Ss Functions
1082 The syntax of a function definition is
1083 .Pp
1084 .D1 Ar name Li \&( \&) Ar command
1085 .Pp
1086 A function definition is an executable statement; when
1087 executed it installs a function named
1088 .Ar name
1089 and returns an
1090 exit status of zero.
1091 The
1092 .Ar command
1093 is normally a list
1094 enclosed between
1095 .Ql {
1096 and
1097 .Ql } .
1098 .Pp
1099 Variables may be declared to be local to a function by
1100 using the
1101 .Ic local
1102 command.
1103 This should appear as the first statement of a function,
1104 and the syntax is:
1105 .Pp
1106 .D1 Ic local Oo Ar variable ... Oc Op Fl
1107 .Pp
1108 The
1109 .Ic local
1110 command is implemented as a built-in command.
1111 .Pp
1112 When a variable is made local, it inherits the initial
1113 value and exported and readonly flags from the variable
1114 with the same name in the surrounding scope, if there is
1115 one.
1116 Otherwise, the variable is initially unset.
1117 The shell
1118 uses dynamic scoping, so that if the variable
1119 .Va x
1120 is made local to function
1121 .Em f ,
1122 which then calls function
1123 .Em g ,
1124 references to the variable
1125 .Va x
1126 made inside
1127 .Em g
1128 will refer to the variable
1129 .Va x
1130 declared inside
1131 .Em f ,
1132 not to the global variable named
1133 .Va x .
1134 .Pp
1135 The only special parameter that can be made local is
1136 .Ql - .
1137 Making
1138 .Ql -
1139 local causes any shell options that are
1140 changed via the
1141 .Ic set
1142 command inside the function to be
1143 restored to their original values when the function
1144 returns.
1145 .Pp
1146 The syntax of the
1147 .Ic return
1148 command is
1149 .Pp
1150 .D1 Ic return Op Ar exitstatus
1151 .Pp
1152 It terminates the current executional scope, returning from the previous
1153 nested function, sourced script, or shell instance, in that order.
1154 The
1155 .Ic return
1156 command is implemented as a special built-in command.
1157 .Ss Variables and Parameters
1158 The shell maintains a set of parameters.
1159 A parameter
1160 denoted by a name is called a variable.
1161 When starting up,
1162 the shell turns all the environment variables into shell
1163 variables.
1164 New variables can be set using the form
1165 .Pp
1166 .D1 Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value
1167 .Pp
1168 Variables set by the user must have a name consisting solely
1169 of alphabetics, numerics, and underscores.
1170 The first letter of a variable name must not be numeric.
1171 A parameter can also be denoted by a number
1172 or a special character as explained below.
1173 .Pp
1174 Assignments are expanded differently from other words:
1175 tilde expansion is also performed after the equals sign and after any colon
1176 and usernames are also terminated by colons,
1177 and field splitting and pathname expansion are not performed.
1178 .Ss Positional Parameters
1179 A positional parameter is a parameter denoted by a number greater than zero.
1180 The shell sets these initially to the values of its command line
1181 arguments that follow the name of the shell script.
1182 The
1183 .Ic set
1184 built-in command can also be used to set or reset them.
1185 .Ss Special Parameters
1186 Special parameters are parameters denoted by a single special character
1187 or the digit zero.
1188 They are shown in the following list, exactly as they would appear in input
1189 typed by the user or in the source of a shell script.
1190 .Bl -hang
1191 .It Li $*
1192 Expands to the positional parameters, starting from one.
1193 When
1194 the expansion occurs within a double-quoted string
1195 it expands to a single field with the value of each parameter
1196 separated by the first character of the
1197 .Va IFS
1198 variable,
1199 or by a space if
1200 .Va IFS
1201 is unset.
1202 .It Li $@
1203 Expands to the positional parameters, starting from one.
1204 When
1205 the expansion occurs within double-quotes, each positional
1206 parameter expands as a separate argument.
1207 If there are no positional parameters, the
1208 expansion of
1209 .Li @
1210 generates zero arguments, even when
1211 .Li @
1212 is double-quoted.
1213 What this basically means, for example, is
1214 if
1215 .Li $1
1216 is
1217 .Dq Li abc
1218 and
1219 .Li $2
1220 is
1221 .Dq Li "def ghi" ,
1222 then
1223 .Li \&"$@\&"
1224 expands to
1225 the two arguments:
1226 .Bd -literal -offset indent
1227 "abc"   "def ghi"
1228 .Ed
1229 .It Li $#
1230 Expands to the number of positional parameters.
1231 .It Li $?
1232 Expands to the exit status of the most recent pipeline.
1233 .It Li $-
1234 (hyphen) Expands to the current option flags (the single-letter
1235 option names concatenated into a string) as specified on
1236 invocation, by the
1237 .Ic set
1238 built-in command, or implicitly
1239 by the shell.
1240 .It Li $$
1241 Expands to the process ID of the invoked shell.
1242 A subshell
1243 retains the same value of
1244 .Va $
1245 as its parent.
1246 .It Li $!
1247 Expands to the process ID of the most recent background
1248 command executed from the current shell.
1249 For a
1250 pipeline, the process ID is that of the last command in the
1251 pipeline.
1252 If this parameter is referenced, the shell will remember
1253 the process ID and its exit status until the
1254 .Ic wait
1255 built-in command reports completion of the process.
1256 .It Li $0
1257 (zero) Expands to the name of the shell script if passed on the command line,
1258 the
1259 .Ar name
1260 operand if given (with
1261 .Fl c )
1262 or otherwise argument 0 passed to the shell.
1263 .El
1264 .Ss Special Variables
1265 The following variables are set by the shell or
1266 have special meaning to it:
1267 .Bl -tag -width ".Va HISTSIZE"
1268 .It Va CDPATH
1269 The search path used with the
1270 .Ic cd
1271 built-in.
1272 .It Va EDITOR
1273 The fallback editor used with the
1274 .Ic fc
1275 built-in.
1276 If not set, the default editor is
1277 .Xr ed 1 .
1278 .It Va FCEDIT
1279 The default editor used with the
1280 .Ic fc
1281 built-in.
1282 .It Va HISTSIZE
1283 The number of previous commands that are accessible.
1284 .It Va HOME
1285 The user's home directory,
1286 used in tilde expansion and as a default directory for the
1287 .Ic cd
1288 built-in.
1289 .It Va IFS
1290 Input Field Separators.
1291 The default value is
1292 .Aq space ,
1293 .Aq tab ,
1294 and
1295 .Aq newline
1296 in that order.
1297 This default also applies if
1298 .Va IFS
1299 is unset, but not if it is set to the empty string.
1300 See the
1301 .Sx White Space Splitting
1302 section for more details.
1303 .It Va LINENO
1304 The current line number in the script or function.
1305 .It Va MAIL
1306 The name of a mail file, that will be checked for the arrival of new
1307 mail.
1308 Overridden by
1309 .Va MAILPATH .
1310 .It Va MAILPATH
1311 A colon
1312 .Pq Ql \&:
1313 separated list of file names, for the shell to check for incoming
1314 mail.
1315 This variable overrides the
1316 .Va MAIL
1317 setting.
1318 There is a maximum of 10 mailboxes that can be monitored at once.
1319 .It Va PATH
1320 The default search path for executables.
1321 See the
1322 .Sx Path Search
1323 section for details.
1324 .It Va PPID
1325 The parent process ID of the invoked shell.
1326 This is set at startup
1327 unless this variable is in the environment.
1328 A later change of parent process ID is not reflected.
1329 A subshell retains the same value of
1330 .Va PPID .
1331 .It Va PS1
1332 The primary prompt string, which defaults to
1333 .Dq Li "$ " ,
1334 unless you are the superuser, in which case it defaults to
1335 .Dq Li "# " .
1336 .It Va PS2
1337 The secondary prompt string, which defaults to
1338 .Dq Li "> " .
1339 .It Va PS4
1340 The prefix for the trace output (if
1341 .Fl x
1342 is active).
1343 The default is
1344 .Dq Li "+ " .
1345 .El
1346 .Ss Word Expansions
1347 This clause describes the various expansions that are
1348 performed on words.
1349 Not all expansions are performed on
1350 every word, as explained later.
1351 .Pp
1352 Tilde expansions, parameter expansions, command substitutions,
1353 arithmetic expansions, and quote removals that occur within
1354 a single word expand to a single field.
1355 It is only field
1356 splitting or pathname expansion that can create multiple
1357 fields from a single word.
1358 The single exception to this rule is
1359 the expansion of the special parameter
1360 .Va @
1361 within double-quotes,
1362 as was described above.
1363 .Pp
1364 The order of word expansion is:
1365 .Bl -enum
1366 .It
1367 Tilde Expansion, Parameter Expansion, Command Substitution,
1368 Arithmetic Expansion (these all occur at the same time).
1369 .It
1370 Field Splitting is performed on fields generated by step (1)
1371 unless the
1372 .Va IFS
1373 variable is null.
1374 .It
1375 Pathname Expansion (unless the
1376 .Fl f
1377 option is in effect).
1378 .It
1379 Quote Removal.
1380 .El
1381 .Pp
1382 The
1383 .Ql $
1384 character is used to introduce parameter expansion, command
1385 substitution, or arithmetic expansion.
1386 .Ss Tilde Expansion (substituting a user's home directory)
1387 A word beginning with an unquoted tilde character
1388 .Pq Ql ~
1389 is
1390 subjected to tilde expansion.
1391 All the characters up to a slash
1392 .Pq Ql /
1393 or the end of the word are treated as a username
1394 and are replaced with the user's home directory.
1395 If the
1396 username is missing (as in
1397 .Pa ~/foobar ) ,
1398 the tilde is replaced with the value of the
1399 .Va HOME
1400 variable (the current user's home directory).
1401 .Ss Parameter Expansion
1402 The format for parameter expansion is as follows:
1403 .Pp
1404 .D1 Li ${ Ns Ar expression Ns Li }
1405 .Pp
1406 where
1407 .Ar expression
1408 consists of all characters until the matching
1409 .Ql } .
1410 Any
1411 .Ql }
1412 escaped by a backslash or within a single-quoted or double-quoted
1413 string, and characters in
1414 embedded arithmetic expansions, command substitutions, and variable
1415 expansions, are not examined in determining the matching
1416 .Ql } .
1417 If the variants with
1418 .Ql + ,
1419 .Ql - ,
1420 .Ql =
1421 or
1422 .Ql ?\&
1423 occur within a double-quoted string,
1424 as an extension there may be unquoted parts
1425 (via double-quotes inside the expansion);
1426 .Ql }
1427 within such parts are also not examined in determining the matching
1428 .Ql } .
1429 .Pp
1430 The simplest form for parameter expansion is:
1431 .Pp
1432 .D1 Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li }
1433 .Pp
1434 The value, if any, of
1435 .Ar parameter
1436 is substituted.
1437 .Pp
1438 The parameter name or symbol can be enclosed in braces, which are
1439 optional except for positional parameters with more than one digit or
1440 when parameter is followed by a character that could be interpreted as
1441 part of the name.
1442 If a parameter expansion occurs inside double-quotes:
1443 .Bl -enum
1444 .It
1445 Field splitting is not performed on the results of the
1446 expansion, with the exception of the special parameter
1447 .Va @ .
1448 .It
1449 Pathname expansion is not performed on the results of the
1450 expansion.
1451 .El
1452 .Pp
1453 In addition, a parameter expansion can be modified by using one of the
1454 following formats.
1455 .Bl -tag -width indent
1456 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li :- Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1457 Use Default Values.
1458 If
1459 .Ar parameter
1460 is unset or null, the expansion of
1461 .Ar word
1462 is substituted; otherwise, the value of
1463 .Ar parameter
1464 is substituted.
1465 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li := Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1466 Assign Default Values.
1467 If
1468 .Ar parameter
1469 is unset or null, the expansion of
1470 .Ar word
1471 is assigned to
1472 .Ar parameter .
1473 In all cases, the
1474 final value of
1475 .Ar parameter
1476 is substituted.
1477 Quoting inside
1478 .Ar word
1479 does not prevent field splitting or pathname expansion.
1480 Only variables, not positional
1481 parameters or special parameters, can be
1482 assigned in this way.
1483 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li :? Ns Oo Ar word Oc Ns Li }
1484 Indicate Error if Null or Unset.
1485 If
1486 .Ar parameter
1487 is unset or null, the expansion of
1488 .Ar word
1489 (or a message indicating it is unset if
1490 .Ar word
1491 is omitted) is written to standard
1492 error and the shell exits with a nonzero
1493 exit status.
1494 Otherwise, the value of
1495 .Ar parameter
1496 is substituted.
1497 An
1498 interactive shell need not exit.
1499 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li :+ Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1500 Use Alternate Value.
1501 If
1502 .Ar parameter
1503 is unset or null, null is substituted;
1504 otherwise, the expansion of
1505 .Ar word
1506 is substituted.
1507 .El
1508 .Pp
1509 In the parameter expansions shown previously, use of the colon in the
1510 format results in a test for a parameter that is unset or null; omission
1511 of the colon results in a test for a parameter that is only unset.
1512 .Pp
1513 The
1514 .Ar word
1515 inherits the type of quoting
1516 (unquoted, double-quoted or here-document)
1517 from the surroundings,
1518 with the exception that a backslash that quotes a closing brace is removed
1519 during quote removal.
1520 .Bl -tag -width indent
1521 .It Li ${# Ns Ar parameter Ns Li }
1522 String Length.
1523 The length in characters of
1524 the value of
1525 .Ar parameter .
1526 .El
1527 .Pp
1528 The following four varieties of parameter expansion provide for substring
1529 processing.
1530 In each case, pattern matching notation
1531 (see
1532 .Sx Shell Patterns ) ,
1533 rather than regular expression notation,
1534 is used to evaluate the patterns.
1535 If parameter is one of the special parameters
1536 .Va *
1537 or
1538 .Va @ ,
1539 the result of the expansion is unspecified.
1540 Enclosing the full parameter expansion string in double-quotes does not
1541 cause the following four varieties of pattern characters to be quoted,
1542 whereas quoting characters within the braces has this effect.
1543 .Bl -tag -width indent
1544 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li % Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1545 Remove Smallest Suffix Pattern.
1546 The
1547 .Ar word
1548 is expanded to produce a pattern.
1549 The
1550 parameter expansion then results in
1551 .Ar parameter ,
1552 with the smallest portion of the
1553 suffix matched by the pattern deleted.
1554 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li %% Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1555 Remove Largest Suffix Pattern.
1556 The
1557 .Ar word
1558 is expanded to produce a pattern.
1559 The
1560 parameter expansion then results in
1561 .Ar parameter ,
1562 with the largest portion of the
1563 suffix matched by the pattern deleted.
1564 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li # Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1565 Remove Smallest Prefix Pattern.
1566 The
1567 .Ar word
1568 is expanded to produce a pattern.
1569 The
1570 parameter expansion then results in
1571 .Ar parameter ,
1572 with the smallest portion of the
1573 prefix matched by the pattern deleted.
1574 .It Li ${ Ns Ar parameter Ns Li ## Ns Ar word Ns Li }
1575 Remove Largest Prefix Pattern.
1576 The
1577 .Ar word
1578 is expanded to produce a pattern.
1579 The
1580 parameter expansion then results in
1581 .Ar parameter ,
1582 with the largest portion of the
1583 prefix matched by the pattern deleted.
1584 .El
1585 .Ss Command Substitution
1586 Command substitution allows the output of a command to be substituted in
1587 place of the command name itself.
1588 Command substitution occurs when
1589 the command is enclosed as follows:
1590 .Pp
1591 .D1 Li $( Ns Ar command Ns Li )\&
1592 .Pp
1593 or the backquoted version:
1594 .Pp
1595 .D1 Li ` Ns Ar command Ns Li `
1596 .Pp
1597 The shell expands the command substitution by executing command
1598 and replacing the command substitution
1599 with the standard output of the command,
1600 removing sequences of one or more newlines at the end of the substitution.
1601 Embedded newlines before the end of the output are not removed;
1602 however, during field splitting, they may be translated into spaces
1603 depending on the value of
1604 .Va IFS
1605 and the quoting that is in effect.
1606 The command is executed in a subshell environment,
1607 except that the built-in commands
1608 .Ic jobid ,
1609 .Ic jobs ,
1610 and
1611 .Ic trap
1612 return information about the parent shell environment
1613 and
1614 .Ic times
1615 returns information about the same process
1616 if they are the only command in a command substitution.
1617 .Ss Arithmetic Expansion
1618 Arithmetic expansion provides a mechanism for evaluating an arithmetic
1619 expression and substituting its value.
1620 The format for arithmetic expansion is as follows:
1621 .Pp
1622 .D1 Li $(( Ns Ar expression Ns Li ))
1623 .Pp
1624 The
1625 .Ar expression
1626 is treated as if it were in double-quotes, except
1627 that a double-quote inside the expression is not treated specially.
1628 The
1629 shell expands all tokens in the
1630 .Ar expression
1631 for parameter expansion,
1632 command substitution,
1633 arithmetic expansion
1634 and quote removal.
1635 .Pp
1636 The allowed expressions are a subset of C expressions,
1637 summarized below.
1638 .Bl -tag -width "Variables" -offset indent
1639 .It Values
1640 All values are of type
1641 .Ft intmax_t .
1642 .It Constants
1643 Decimal, octal (starting with
1644 .Li 0 )
1645 and hexadecimal (starting with
1646 .Li 0x )
1647 integer constants.
1648 .It Variables
1649 Shell variables can be read and written
1650 and contain integer constants.
1651 .It Unary operators
1652 .Li "! ~ + -"
1653 .It Binary operators
1654 .Li "* / % + - << >> < <= > >= == != & ^ | && ||"
1655 .It Assignment operators
1656 .Li "= += -= *= /= %= <<= >>= &= ^= |="
1657 .It Conditional operator
1658 .Li "? :"
1659 .El
1660 .Pp
1661 The result of the expression is substituted in decimal.
1662 .Ss White Space Splitting (Field Splitting)
1663 In certain contexts,
1664 after parameter expansion, command substitution, and
1665 arithmetic expansion the shell scans the results of
1666 expansions and substitutions that did not occur in double-quotes for
1667 field splitting and multiple fields can result.
1668 .Pp
1669 Characters in
1670 .Va IFS
1671 that are whitespace
1672 .Po
1673 .Aq space ,
1674 .Aq tab ,
1675 and
1676 .Aq newline
1677 .Pc
1678 are treated differently from other characters in
1679 .Va IFS .
1680 .Pp
1681 Whitespace in
1682 .Va IFS
1683 at the beginning or end of a word is discarded.
1684 .Pp
1685 Subsequently, a field is delimited by either
1686 .Bl -enum
1687 .It
1688 a non-whitespace character in
1689 .Va IFS
1690 with any whitespace in
1691 .Va IFS
1692 surrounding it, or
1693 .It
1694 one or more whitespace characters in
1695 .Va IFS .
1696 .El
1697 .Pp
1698 If a word ends with a non-whitespace character in
1699 .Va IFS ,
1700 there is no empty field after this character.
1701 .Pp
1702 If no field is delimited, the word is discarded.
1703 In particular, if a word consists solely of an unquoted substitution
1704 and the result of the substitution is null,
1705 it is removed by field splitting even if
1706 .Va IFS
1707 is null.
1708 .Ss Pathname Expansion (File Name Generation)
1709 Unless the
1710 .Fl f
1711 option is set,
1712 file name generation is performed
1713 after word splitting is complete.
1714 Each word is
1715 viewed as a series of patterns, separated by slashes.
1716 The
1717 process of expansion replaces the word with the names of
1718 all existing files whose names can be formed by replacing
1719 each pattern with a string that matches the specified pattern.
1720 There are two restrictions on this: first, a pattern cannot match
1721 a string containing a slash, and second,
1722 a pattern cannot match a string starting with a period
1723 unless the first character of the pattern is a period.
1724 The next section describes the patterns used for
1725 Pathname Expansion,
1726 the four varieties of parameter expansion for substring processing and the
1727 .Ic case
1728 command.
1729 .Ss Shell Patterns
1730 A pattern consists of normal characters, which match themselves,
1731 and meta-characters.
1732 The meta-characters are
1733 .Ql * ,
1734 .Ql \&? ,
1735 and
1736 .Ql \&[ .
1737 These characters lose their special meanings if they are quoted.
1738 When command or variable substitution is performed and the dollar sign
1739 or back quotes are not double-quoted, the value of the
1740 variable or the output of the command is scanned for these
1741 characters and they are turned into meta-characters.
1742 .Pp
1743 An asterisk
1744 .Pq Ql *
1745 matches any string of characters.
1746 A question mark
1747 .Pq Ql \&?
1748 matches any single character.
1749 A left bracket
1750 .Pq Ql \&[
1751 introduces a character class.
1752 The end of the character class is indicated by a
1753 .Ql \&] ;
1754 if the
1755 .Ql \&]
1756 is missing then the
1757 .Ql \&[
1758 matches a
1759 .Ql \&[
1760 rather than introducing a character class.
1761 A character class matches any of the characters between the square brackets.
1762 A locale-dependent range of characters may be specified using a minus sign.
1763 A named class of characters (see
1764 .Xr wctype 3 )
1765 may be specified by surrounding the name with
1766 .Ql \&[:
1767 and
1768 .Ql :\&] .
1769 For example,
1770 .Ql \&[\&[:alpha:\&]\&]
1771 is a shell pattern that matches a single letter.
1772 The character class may be complemented by making an exclamation point
1773 .Pq Ql !\&
1774 the first character of the character class.
1775 A caret
1776 .Pq Ql ^
1777 has the same effect but is non-standard.
1778 .Pp
1779 To include a
1780 .Ql \&]
1781 in a character class, make it the first character listed
1782 (after the
1783 .Ql \&!
1784 or
1785 .Ql ^ ,
1786 if any).
1787 To include a
1788 .Ql - ,
1789 make it the first or last character listed.
1790 .Ss Built-in Commands
1791 This section lists the built-in commands.
1792 .Bl -tag -width indent
1793 .It Ic \&:
1794 A null command that returns a 0 (true) exit value.
1795 .It Ic \&. Ar file
1796 The commands in the specified file are read and executed by the shell.
1797 The
1798 .Ic return
1799 command may be used to return to the
1800 .Ic \&.
1801 command's caller.
1802 If
1803 .Ar file
1804 contains any
1805 .Ql /
1806 characters, it is used as is.
1807 Otherwise, the shell searches the
1808 .Va PATH
1809 for the file.
1810 If it is not found in the
1811 .Va PATH ,
1812 it is sought in the current working directory.
1813 .It Ic \&[
1814 A built-in equivalent of
1815 .Xr test 1 .
1816 .It Ic alias Oo Ar name Ns Oo = Ns Ar string Oc Ar ... Oc
1817 If
1818 .Ar name Ns = Ns Ar string
1819 is specified, the shell defines the alias
1820 .Ar name
1821 with value
1822 .Ar string .
1823 If just
1824 .Ar name
1825 is specified, the value of the alias
1826 .Ar name
1827 is printed.
1828 With no arguments, the
1829 .Ic alias
1830 built-in command prints the names and values of all defined aliases
1831 (see
1832 .Ic unalias ) .
1833 Alias values are written with appropriate quoting so that they are
1834 suitable for re-input to the shell.
1835 Also see the
1836 .Sx Aliases
1837 subsection.
1838 .It Ic bg Op Ar job ...
1839 Continue the specified jobs
1840 (or the current job if no jobs are given)
1841 in the background.
1842 .It Ic bind Oo Fl aeklrsv Oc Oo Ar key Oo Ar command Oc Oc
1843 List or alter key bindings for the line editor.
1844 This command is documented in
1845 .Xr editrc 5 .
1846 .It Ic break Op Ar num
1847 See the
1848 .Sx Flow-Control Constructs
1849 subsection.
1850 .It Ic builtin Ar cmd Op Ar arg ...
1851 Execute the specified built-in command,
1852 .Ar cmd .
1853 This is useful when the user wishes to override a shell function
1854 with the same name as a built-in command.
1855 .It Ic cd Oo Fl L | P Oc Oo Fl e Oc Op Ar directory
1856 Switch to the specified
1857 .Ar directory ,
1858 or to the directory specified in the
1859 .Va HOME
1860 environment variable if no
1861 .Ar directory
1862 is specified.
1863 If
1864 .Ar directory
1865 does not begin with
1866 .Pa / , \&. ,
1867 or
1868 .Pa .. ,
1869 then the directories listed in the
1870 .Va CDPATH
1871 variable will be
1872 searched for the specified
1873 .Ar directory .
1874 If
1875 .Va CDPATH
1876 is unset, the current directory is searched.
1877 The format of
1878 .Va CDPATH
1879 is the same as that of
1880 .Va PATH .
1881 In an interactive shell,
1882 the
1883 .Ic cd
1884 command will print out the name of the directory
1885 that it actually switched to
1886 if this is different from the name that the user gave.
1887 These may be different either because the
1888 .Va CDPATH
1889 mechanism was used or because a symbolic link was crossed.
1890 .Pp
1891 If the
1892 .Fl P
1893 option is specified,
1894 .Pa ..
1895 is handled physically and symbolic links are resolved before
1896 .Pa ..
1897 components are processed.
1898 If the
1899 .Fl L
1900 option is specified,
1901 .Pa ..
1902 is handled logically.
1903 This is the default.
1904 .Pp
1905 The
1906 .Fl e
1907 option causes
1908 .Ic cd
1909 to return exit status 1 if the full pathname of the new directory
1910 cannot be determined reliably or at all.
1911 Normally this is not considered an error,
1912 although a warning is printed.
1913 .It Ic chdir
1914 A synonym for the
1915 .Ic cd
1916 built-in command.
1917 .It Ic command Oo Fl p Oc Op Ar utility Op Ar argument ...
1918 .It Ic command Oo Fl p Oc Fl v Ar utility
1919 .It Ic command Oo Fl p Oc Fl V Ar utility
1920 The first form of invocation executes the specified
1921 .Ar utility ,
1922 ignoring shell functions in the search.
1923 If
1924 .Ar utility
1925 is a special builtin,
1926 it is executed as if it were a regular builtin.
1927 .Pp
1928 If the
1929 .Fl p
1930 option is specified, the command search is performed using a
1931 default value of
1932 .Va PATH
1933 that is guaranteed to find all of the standard utilities.
1934 .Pp
1935 If the
1936 .Fl v
1937 option is specified,
1938 .Ar utility
1939 is not executed but a description of its interpretation by the shell is
1940 printed.
1941 For ordinary commands the output is the path name; for shell built-in
1942 commands, shell functions and keywords only the name is written.
1943 Aliases are printed as
1944 .Dq Ic alias Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value .
1945 .Pp
1946 The
1947 .Fl V
1948 option is identical to
1949 .Fl v
1950 except for the output.
1951 It prints
1952 .Dq Ar utility Ic is Ar description
1953 where
1954 .Ar description
1955 is either
1956 the path name to
1957 .Ar utility ,
1958 a special shell builtin,
1959 a shell builtin,
1960 a shell function,
1961 a shell keyword
1962 or
1963 an alias for
1964 .Ar value .
1965 .It Ic continue Op Ar num
1966 See the
1967 .Sx Flow-Control Constructs
1968 subsection.
1969 .It Ic echo Oo Fl e | n Oc Op Ar string ...
1970 Print a space-separated list of the arguments to the standard output
1971 and append a newline character.
1972 .Bl -tag -width indent
1973 .It Fl n
1974 Suppress the output of the trailing newline.
1975 .It Fl e
1976 Process C-style backslash escape sequences.
1977 The
1978 .Ic echo
1979 command understands the following character escapes:
1980 .Bl -tag -width indent
1981 .It \ea
1982 Alert (ring the terminal bell)
1983 .It \eb
1984 Backspace
1985 .It \ec
1986 Suppress the trailing newline (this has the side-effect of truncating the
1987 line if it is not the last character)
1988 .It \ee
1989 The ESC character
1990 .Tn ( ASCII
1991 0x1b)
1992 .It \ef
1993 Formfeed
1994 .It \en
1995 Newline
1996 .It \er
1997 Carriage return
1998 .It \et
1999 Horizontal tab
2000 .It \ev
2001 Vertical tab
2002 .It \e\e
2003 Literal backslash
2004 .It \e0nnn
2005 (Zero) The character whose octal value is
2006 .Ar nnn
2007 .El
2008 .Pp
2009 If
2010 .Ar string
2011 is not enclosed in quotes then the backslash itself must be escaped
2012 with a backslash to protect it from the shell.
2013 For example
2014 .Bd -literal -offset indent
2015 $ echo -e "a\evb"
2016 a
2017  b
2018 $ echo -e a\e\evb
2019 a
2020  b
2021 $ echo -e "a\e\eb"
2022 a\eb
2023 $ echo -e a\e\e\e\eb
2024 a\eb
2025 .Ed
2026 .El
2027 .Pp
2028 Only one of the
2029 .Fl e
2030 and
2031 .Fl n
2032 options may be specified.
2033 .It Ic eval Ar string ...
2034 Concatenate all the arguments with spaces.
2035 Then re-parse and execute the command.
2036 .It Ic exec Op Ar command Op Ar arg ...
2037 Unless
2038 .Ar command
2039 is omitted,
2040 the shell process is replaced with the specified program
2041 (which must be a real program, not a shell built-in command or function).
2042 Any redirections on the
2043 .Ic exec
2044 command are marked as permanent,
2045 so that they are not undone when the
2046 .Ic exec
2047 command finishes.
2048 .It Ic exit Op Ar exitstatus
2049 Terminate the shell process.
2050 If
2051 .Ar exitstatus
2052 is given
2053 it is used as the exit status of the shell.
2054 Otherwise, if the shell is executing an
2055 .Cm EXIT
2056 trap, the exit status of the last command before the trap is used;
2057 if the shell is executing a trap for a signal,
2058 the shell exits by resending the signal to itself.
2059 Otherwise, the exit status of the preceding command is used.
2060 The exit status should be an integer between 0 and 255.
2061 .It Ic export Ar name ...
2062 .It Ic export Op Fl p
2063 The specified names are exported so that they will
2064 appear in the environment of subsequent commands.
2065 The only way to un-export a variable is to
2066 .Ic unset
2067 it.
2068 The shell allows the value of a variable to be set
2069 at the same time as it is exported by writing
2070 .Pp
2071 .D1 Ic export Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value
2072 .Pp
2073 With no arguments the
2074 .Ic export
2075 command lists the names
2076 of all exported variables.
2077 If the
2078 .Fl p
2079 option is specified, the exported variables are printed as
2080 .Dq Ic export Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value
2081 lines, suitable for re-input to the shell.
2082 .It Ic false
2083 A null command that returns a non-zero (false) exit value.
2084 .It Ic fc Oo Fl e Ar editor Oc Op Ar first Op Ar last
2085 .It Ic fc Fl l Oo Fl nr Oc Op Ar first Op Ar last
2086 .It Ic fc Fl s Oo Ar old Ns = Ns Ar new Oc Op Ar first
2087 The
2088 .Ic fc
2089 built-in command lists, or edits and re-executes,
2090 commands previously entered to an interactive shell.
2091 .Bl -tag -width indent
2092 .It Fl e Ar editor
2093 Use the editor named by
2094 .Ar editor
2095 to edit the commands.
2096 The
2097 .Ar editor
2098 string is a command name,
2099 subject to search via the
2100 .Va PATH
2101 variable.
2102 The value in the
2103 .Va FCEDIT
2104 variable is used as a default when
2105 .Fl e
2106 is not specified.
2107 If
2108 .Va FCEDIT
2109 is null or unset, the value of the
2110 .Va EDITOR
2111 variable is used.
2112 If
2113 .Va EDITOR
2114 is null or unset,
2115 .Xr ed 1
2116 is used as the editor.
2117 .It Fl l No (ell)
2118 List the commands rather than invoking
2119 an editor on them.
2120 The commands are written in the
2121 sequence indicated by the
2122 .Ar first
2123 and
2124 .Ar last
2125 operands, as affected by
2126 .Fl r ,
2127 with each command preceded by the command number.
2128 .It Fl n
2129 Suppress command numbers when listing with
2130 .Fl l .
2131 .It Fl r
2132 Reverse the order of the commands listed
2133 (with
2134 .Fl l )
2135 or edited
2136 (with neither
2137 .Fl l
2138 nor
2139 .Fl s ) .
2140 .It Fl s
2141 Re-execute the command without invoking an editor.
2142 .It Ar first
2143 .It Ar last
2144 Select the commands to list or edit.
2145 The number of previous commands that can be accessed
2146 are determined by the value of the
2147 .Va HISTSIZE
2148 variable.
2149 The value of
2150 .Ar first
2151 or
2152 .Ar last
2153 or both are one of the following:
2154 .Bl -tag -width indent
2155 .It Oo Cm + Oc Ns Ar num
2156 A positive number representing a command number;
2157 command numbers can be displayed with the
2158 .Fl l
2159 option.
2160 .It Fl Ar num
2161 A negative decimal number representing the
2162 command that was executed
2163 .Ar num
2164 of
2165 commands previously.
2166 For example, \-1 is the immediately previous command.
2167 .It Ar string
2168 A string indicating the most recently entered command
2169 that begins with that string.
2170 If the
2171 .Ar old Ns = Ns Ar new
2172 operand is not also specified with
2173 .Fl s ,
2174 the string form of the first operand cannot contain an embedded equal sign.
2175 .El
2176 .El
2177 .Pp
2178 The following variables affect the execution of
2179 .Ic fc :
2180 .Bl -tag -width ".Va HISTSIZE"
2181 .It Va FCEDIT
2182 Name of the editor to use for history editing.
2183 .It Va HISTSIZE
2184 The number of previous commands that are accessible.
2185 .El
2186 .It Ic fg Op Ar job
2187 Move the specified
2188 .Ar job
2189 or the current job to the foreground.
2190 .It Ic getopts Ar optstring var
2191 The
2192 .Tn POSIX
2193 .Ic getopts
2194 command.
2195 The
2196 .Ic getopts
2197 command deprecates the older
2198 .Xr getopt 1
2199 command.
2200 The first argument should be a series of letters, each possibly
2201 followed by a colon which indicates that the option takes an argument.
2202 The specified variable is set to the parsed option.
2203 The index of
2204 the next argument is placed into the shell variable
2205 .Va OPTIND .
2206 If an option takes an argument, it is placed into the shell variable
2207 .Va OPTARG .
2208 If an invalid option is encountered,
2209 .Ar var
2210 is set to
2211 .Ql \&? .
2212 It returns a false value (1) when it encounters the end of the options.
2213 .It Ic hash Oo Fl rv Oc Op Ar command ...
2214 The shell maintains a hash table which remembers the locations of commands.
2215 With no arguments whatsoever, the
2216 .Ic hash
2217 command prints out the contents of this table.
2218 Entries which have not been looked at since the last
2219 .Ic cd
2220 command are marked with an asterisk;
2221 it is possible for these entries to be invalid.
2222 .Pp
2223 With arguments, the
2224 .Ic hash
2225 command removes each specified
2226 .Ar command
2227 from the hash table (unless they are functions) and then locates it.
2228 With the
2229 .Fl v
2230 option,
2231 .Ic hash
2232 prints the locations of the commands as it finds them.
2233 The
2234 .Fl r
2235 option causes the
2236 .Ic hash
2237 command to delete all the entries in the hash table except for functions.
2238 .It Ic jobid Op Ar job
2239 Print the process IDs of the processes in the specified
2240 .Ar job .
2241 If the
2242 .Ar job
2243 argument is omitted, use the current job.
2244 .It Ic jobs Oo Fl lps Oc Op Ar job ...
2245 Print information about the specified jobs, or all jobs if no
2246 .Ar job
2247 argument is given.
2248 The information printed includes job ID, status and command name.
2249 .Pp
2250 If the
2251 .Fl l
2252 option is specified, the PID of each job is also printed.
2253 If the
2254 .Fl p
2255 option is specified, only the process IDs for the process group leaders
2256 are printed, one per line.
2257 If the
2258 .Fl s
2259 option is specified, only the PIDs of the job commands are printed, one per
2260 line.
2261 .It Ic kill
2262 A built-in equivalent of
2263 .Xr kill 1
2264 that additionally supports sending signals to jobs.
2265 .It Ic local Oo Ar variable ... Oc Op Fl
2266 See the
2267 .Sx Functions
2268 subsection.
2269 .It Ic printf
2270 A built-in equivalent of
2271 .Xr printf 1 .
2272 .It Ic pwd Op Fl L | P
2273 Print the path of the current directory.
2274 The built-in command may
2275 differ from the program of the same name because the
2276 built-in command remembers what the current directory
2277 is rather than recomputing it each time.
2278 This makes
2279 it faster.
2280 However, if the current directory is
2281 renamed,
2282 the built-in version of
2283 .Xr pwd 1
2284 will continue to print the old name for the directory.
2285 .Pp
2286 If the
2287 .Fl P
2288 option is specified, symbolic links are resolved.
2289 If the
2290 .Fl L
2291 option is specified, the shell's notion of the current directory
2292 is printed (symbolic links are not resolved).
2293 This is the default.
2294 .It Ic read Oo Fl p Ar prompt Oc Oo
2295 .Fl t Ar timeout Oc Oo Fl er Oc Ar variable ...
2296 The
2297 .Ar prompt
2298 is printed if the
2299 .Fl p
2300 option is specified
2301 and the standard input is a terminal.
2302 Then a line is
2303 read from the standard input.
2304 The trailing newline
2305 is deleted from the line and the line is split as
2306 described in the section on
2307 .Sx White Space Splitting (Field Splitting)
2308 above, and
2309 the pieces are assigned to the variables in order.
2310 If there are more pieces than variables, the remaining
2311 pieces (along with the characters in
2312 .Va IFS
2313 that separated them)
2314 are assigned to the last variable.
2315 If there are more variables than pieces, the remaining
2316 variables are assigned the null string.
2317 .Pp
2318 Backslashes are treated specially, unless the
2319 .Fl r
2320 option is
2321 specified.
2322 If a backslash is followed by
2323 a newline, the backslash and the newline will be
2324 deleted.
2325 If a backslash is followed by any other
2326 character, the backslash will be deleted and the following
2327 character will be treated as though it were not in
2328 .Va IFS ,
2329 even if it is.
2330 .Pp
2331 If the
2332 .Fl t
2333 option is specified and the
2334 .Ar timeout
2335 elapses before a complete line of input is supplied,
2336 the
2337 .Ic read
2338 command will return an exit status of 1 without assigning any values.
2339 The
2340 .Ar timeout
2341 value may optionally be followed by one of
2342 .Ql s ,
2343 .Ql m
2344 or
2345 .Ql h
2346 to explicitly specify seconds, minutes or hours.
2347 If none is supplied,
2348 .Ql s
2349 is assumed.
2350 .Pp
2351 The
2352 .Fl e
2353 option exists only for backward compatibility with older scripts.
2354 .It Ic readonly Oo Fl p Oc Op Ar name ...
2355 Each specified
2356 .Ar name
2357 is marked as read only,
2358 so that it cannot be subsequently modified or unset.
2359 The shell allows the value of a variable to be set
2360 at the same time as it is marked read only
2361 by using the following form:
2362 .Pp
2363 .D1 Ic readonly Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value
2364 .Pp
2365 With no arguments the
2366 .Ic readonly
2367 command lists the names of all read only variables.
2368 If the
2369 .Fl p
2370 option is specified, the read-only variables are printed as
2371 .Dq Ic readonly Ar name Ns = Ns Ar value
2372 lines, suitable for re-input to the shell.
2373 .It Ic return Op Ar exitstatus
2374 See the
2375 .Sx Functions
2376 subsection.
2377 .It Ic set Oo Fl /+abCEefIimnpTuVvx Oc Oo Fl /+o Ar longname Oc Oo
2378 .Fl c Ar string Oc Op Fl - Ar arg ...
2379 The
2380 .Ic set
2381 command performs three different functions:
2382 .Bl -item
2383 .It
2384 With no arguments, it lists the values of all shell variables.
2385 .It
2386 If options are given,
2387 either in short form or using the long
2388 .Dq Fl /+o Ar longname
2389 form,
2390 it sets or clears the specified options as described in the section called
2391 .Sx Argument List Processing .
2392 .It
2393 If the
2394 .Dq Fl -
2395 option is specified,
2396 .Ic set
2397 will replace the shell's positional parameters with the subsequent
2398 arguments.
2399 If no arguments follow the
2400 .Dq Fl -
2401 option,
2402 all the positional parameters will be cleared,
2403 which is equivalent to executing the command
2404 .Dq Li "shift $#" .
2405 The
2406 .Dq Fl -
2407 flag may be omitted when specifying arguments to be used
2408 as positional replacement parameters.
2409 This is not recommended,
2410 because the first argument may begin with a dash
2411 .Pq Ql -
2412 or a plus
2413 .Pq Ql + ,
2414 which the
2415 .Ic set
2416 command will interpret as a request to enable or disable options.
2417 .El
2418 .It Ic setvar Ar variable value
2419 Assigns the specified
2420 .Ar value
2421 to the specified
2422 .Ar variable .
2423 The
2424 .Ic setvar
2425 command is intended to be used in functions that
2426 assign values to variables whose names are passed as parameters.
2427 In general it is better to write
2428 .Dq Ar variable Ns = Ns Ar value
2429 rather than using
2430 .Ic setvar .
2431 .It Ic shift Op Ar n
2432 Shift the positional parameters
2433 .Ar n
2434 times, or once if
2435 .Ar n
2436 is not specified.
2437 A shift sets the value of
2438 .Li $1
2439 to the value of
2440 .Li $2 ,
2441 the value of
2442 .Li $2
2443 to the value of
2444 .Li $3 ,
2445 and so on,
2446 decreasing the value of
2447 .Li $#
2448 by one.
2449 If there are zero positional parameters, shifting does not do anything.
2450 .It Ic test
2451 A built-in equivalent of
2452 .Xr test 1 .
2453 .It Ic times
2454 Print the amount of time spent executing the shell process and its children.
2455 The first output line shows the user and system times for the shell process
2456 itself, the second one contains the user and system times for the
2457 children.
2458 .It Ic trap Oo Ar action Oc Ar signal ...
2459 .It Ic trap Fl l
2460 Cause the shell to parse and execute
2461 .Ar action
2462 when any specified
2463 .Ar signal
2464 is received.
2465 The signals are specified by name or number.
2466 In addition, the pseudo-signal
2467 .Cm EXIT
2468 may be used to specify an
2469 .Ar action
2470 that is performed when the shell terminates.
2471 The
2472 .Ar action
2473 may be an empty string or a dash
2474 .Pq Ql - ;
2475 the former causes the specified signal to be ignored
2476 and the latter causes the default action to be taken.
2477 Omitting the
2478 .Ar action
2479 is another way to request the default action, for compatibility reasons this
2480 usage is not recommended though.
2481 In a subshell or utility environment,
2482 the shell resets trapped (but not ignored) signals to the default action.
2483 The
2484 .Ic trap
2485 command has no effect on signals that were ignored on entry to the shell.
2486 .Pp
2487 Option
2488 .Fl l
2489 causes the
2490 .Ic trap
2491 command to display a list of valid signal names.
2492 .It Ic true
2493 A null command that returns a 0 (true) exit value.
2494 .It Ic type Op Ar name ...
2495 Interpret each
2496 .Ar name
2497 as a command and print the resolution of the command search.
2498 Possible resolutions are:
2499 shell keyword, alias, special shell builtin, shell builtin, command,
2500 tracked alias
2501 and not found.
2502 For aliases the alias expansion is printed;
2503 for commands and tracked aliases
2504 the complete pathname of the command is printed.
2505 .It Ic ulimit Oo Fl HSabcdflmnstuv Oc Op Ar limit
2506 Set or display resource limits (see
2507 .Xr getrlimit 2 ) .
2508 If
2509 .Ar limit
2510 is specified, the named resource will be set;
2511 otherwise the current resource value will be displayed.
2512 .Pp
2513 If
2514 .Fl H
2515 is specified, the hard limits will be set or displayed.
2516 While everybody is allowed to reduce a hard limit,
2517 only the superuser can increase it.
2518 The
2519 .Fl S
2520 option
2521 specifies the soft limits instead.
2522 When displaying limits,
2523 only one of
2524 .Fl S
2525 or
2526 .Fl H
2527 can be given.
2528 The default is to display the soft limits,
2529 and to set both the hard and the soft limits.
2530 .Pp
2531 Option
2532 .Fl a
2533 causes the
2534 .Ic ulimit
2535 command to display all resources.
2536 The parameter
2537 .Ar limit
2538 is not acceptable in this mode.
2539 .Pp
2540 The remaining options specify which resource value is to be
2541 displayed or modified.
2542 They are mutually exclusive.
2543 .Bl -tag -width indent
2544 .It Fl b Ar sbsize
2545 The maximum size of socket buffer usage, in bytes.
2546 .It Fl c Ar coredumpsize
2547 The maximal size of core dump files, in 512-byte blocks.
2548 .It Fl d Ar datasize
2549 The maximal size of the data segment of a process, in kilobytes.
2550 .It Fl f Ar filesize
2551 The maximal size of a file, in 512-byte blocks.
2552 .It Fl l Ar lockedmem
2553 The maximal size of memory that can be locked by a process, in
2554 kilobytes.
2555 .It Fl m Ar memoryuse
2556 The maximal resident set size of a process, in kilobytes.
2557 .It Fl n Ar nofiles
2558 The maximal number of descriptors that could be opened by a process.
2559 .It Fl s Ar stacksize
2560 The maximal size of the stack segment, in kilobytes.
2561 .It Fl t Ar time
2562 The maximal amount of CPU time to be used by each process, in seconds.
2563 .It Fl u Ar userproc
2564 The maximal number of simultaneous processes for this user ID.
2565 .It Fl v Ar virtualmem
2566 The maximal virtual size of a process, in kilobytes.
2567 .El
2568 .It Ic umask Oo Fl S Oc Op Ar mask
2569 Set the file creation mask (see
2570 .Xr umask 2 )
2571 to the octal or symbolic (see
2572 .Xr chmod 1 )
2573 value specified by
2574 .Ar mask .
2575 If the argument is omitted, the current mask value is printed.
2576 If the
2577 .Fl S
2578 option is specified, the output is symbolic, otherwise the output is octal.
2579 .It Ic unalias Oo Fl a Oc Op Ar name ...
2580 The specified alias names are removed.
2581 If
2582 .Fl a
2583 is specified, all aliases are removed.
2584 .It Ic unset Oo Fl fv Oc Ar name ...
2585 The specified variables or functions are unset and unexported.
2586 If the
2587 .Fl v
2588 option is specified or no options are given, the
2589 .Ar name
2590 arguments are treated as variable names.
2591 If the
2592 .Fl f
2593 option is specified, the
2594 .Ar name
2595 arguments are treated as function names.
2596 .It Ic wait Op Ar job
2597 Wait for the specified
2598 .Ar job
2599 to complete and return the exit status of the last process in the
2600 .Ar job .
2601 If the argument is omitted, wait for all jobs to complete
2602 and return an exit status of zero.
2603 .El
2604 .Ss Commandline Editing
2605 When
2606 .Nm
2607 is being used interactively from a terminal, the current command
2608 and the command history
2609 (see
2610 .Ic fc
2611 in
2612 .Sx Built-in Commands )
2613 can be edited using
2614 .Nm vi Ns -mode
2615 command line editing.
2616 This mode uses commands similar
2617 to a subset of those described in the
2618 .Xr vi 1
2619 man page.
2620 The command
2621 .Dq Li "set -o vi"
2622 (or
2623 .Dq Li "set -V" )
2624 enables
2625 .Nm vi Ns -mode
2626 editing and places
2627 .Nm
2628 into
2629 .Nm vi
2630 insert mode.
2631 With
2632 .Nm vi Ns -mode
2633 enabled,
2634 .Nm
2635 can be switched between insert mode and command mode by typing
2636 .Aq ESC .
2637 Hitting
2638 .Aq return
2639 while in command mode will pass the line to the shell.
2640 .Pp
2641 Similarly, the
2642 .Dq Li "set -o emacs"
2643 (or
2644 .Dq Li "set -E" )
2645 command can be used to enable a subset of
2646 .Nm emacs Ns -style
2647 command line editing features.
2648 .Sh ENVIRONMENT
2649 The following environment variables affect the execution of
2650 .Nm :
2651 .Bl -tag -width ".Ev LANGXXXXXX"
2652 .It Ev ENV
2653 Initialization file for interactive shells.
2654 .It Ev LANG , Ev LC_*
2655 Locale settings.
2656 These are inherited by children of the shell,
2657 and is used in a limited manner by the shell itself.
2658 .It Ev PWD
2659 An absolute pathname for the current directory,
2660 possibly containing symbolic links.
2661 This is used and updated by the shell.
2662 .It Ev TERM
2663 The default terminal setting for the shell.
2664 This is inherited by children of the shell, and is used in the history
2665 editing modes.
2666 .El
2667 .Pp
2668 Additionally, all environment variables are turned into shell variables
2669 at startup,
2670 which may affect the shell as described under
2671 .Sx Special Variables .
2672 .Sh EXIT STATUS
2673 Errors that are detected by the shell, such as a syntax error, will
2674 cause the shell to exit with a non-zero exit status.
2675 If the shell is not an interactive shell, the execution of the shell
2676 file will be aborted.
2677 Otherwise the shell will return the exit status of the last command
2678 executed, or if the
2679 .Ic exit
2680 builtin is used with a numeric argument, it
2681 will return the argument.
2682 .Sh SEE ALSO
2683 .Xr builtin 1 ,
2684 .Xr chsh 1 ,
2685 .Xr echo 1 ,
2686 .Xr ed 1 ,
2687 .Xr emacs 1 Pq Pa pkgsrc/editors/emacs ,
2688 .Xr kill 1 ,
2689 .Xr printf 1 ,
2690 .Xr pwd 1 ,
2691 .Xr test 1 ,
2692 .Xr vi 1 ,
2693 .Xr execve 2 ,
2694 .Xr getrlimit 2 ,
2695 .Xr umask 2 ,
2696 .Xr wctype 3 ,
2697 .Xr editrc 5 ,
2698 .Xr script 7
2699 .Sh HISTORY
2700 A
2701 .Nm
2702 command, the Thompson shell, appeared in
2703 .At v1 .
2704 It was superseded in
2705 .At v7
2706 by the Bourne shell, which inherited the name
2707 .Nm .
2708 .Pp
2709 This version of
2710 .Nm
2711 was rewritten in 1989 under the
2712 .Bx
2713 license after the Bourne shell from
2714 .At V.4 .
2715 .Sh AUTHORS
2716 This version of
2717 .Nm
2718 was originally written by
2719 .An Kenneth Almquist .
2720 .Sh BUGS
2721 The
2722 .Nm
2723 utility does not recognize multibyte characters other than UTF-8.
2724 Splitting using
2725 .Va IFS
2726 and the line editing library
2727 .Xr editline 3
2728 do not recognize multibyte characters.
2729 .Pp
2730 The characters generated by filename completion should probably be quoted
2731 to ensure that the filename is still valid after the input line has been
2732 processed.