Some cleanup in the pf manual pages.
[dragonfly.git] / usr.sbin / pfctl / pfctl.8
1 .\" $OpenBSD: pfctl.8,v 1.128 2007/01/30 21:01:56 jmc Exp $
2 .\"
3 .\" Copyright (c) 2001 Kjell Wooding.  All rights reserved.
4 .\"
5 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
6 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
7 .\" are met:
8 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
9 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
10 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
11 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
12 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
13 .\" 3. The name of the author may not be used to endorse or promote products
14 .\"    derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
15 .\"
16 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR
17 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
18 .\" OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
19 .\" IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
20 .\" INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
21 .\" NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
22 .\" DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
23 .\" THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
24 .\" (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
25 .\" THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
26 .\"
27 .Dd November 20, 2002
28 .Dt PFCTL 8
29 .Os
30 .Sh NAME
31 .Nm pfctl
32 .Nd "control the packet filter (PF) and network address translation (NAT) device"
33 .Sh SYNOPSIS
34 .Nm
35 .Bk -words
36 .Op Fl AdeghmNnOqRrvz
37 .Op Fl a Ar anchor
38 .Oo Fl D Ar macro Ns =
39 .Ar value Oc
40 .Op Fl F Ar modifier
41 .Op Fl f Ar file
42 .Op Fl i Ar interface
43 .Op Fl K Ar host | network
44 .Op Fl k Ar host | network
45 .Op Fl o Op Ar level
46 .Op Fl p Ar device
47 .Op Fl s Ar modifier
48 .Oo
49 .Fl t Ar table
50 .Fl T Ar command
51 .Op Ar address ...
52 .Oc
53 .Op Fl x Ar level
54 .Ek
55 .Sh DESCRIPTION
56 The
57 .Nm
58 utility communicates with the packet filter device using the
59 ioctl interface described in
60 .Xr pf 4 .
61 It allows ruleset and parameter configuration and retrieval of status
62 information from the packet filter.
63 .Pp
64 Packet filtering restricts the types of packets that pass through
65 network interfaces entering or leaving the host based on filter
66 rules as described in
67 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
68 The packet filter can also replace addresses and ports of packets.
69 Replacing source addresses and ports of outgoing packets is called
70 NAT (Network Address Translation) and is used to connect an internal
71 network (usually reserved address space) to an external one (the
72 Internet) by making all connections to external hosts appear to
73 come from the gateway.
74 Replacing destination addresses and ports of incoming packets
75 is used to redirect connections to different hosts and/or ports.
76 A combination of both translations, bidirectional NAT, is also
77 supported.
78 Translation rules are described in
79 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
80 .Pp
81 When the variable
82 .Va pf
83 is set to
84 .Dv YES
85 in
86 .Xr rc.conf 5 ,
87 the rule file specified with the variable
88 .Va pf_rules
89 is loaded automatically by the
90 .Xr rc 8
91 scripts and the packet filter is enabled.
92 .Pp
93 The packet filter does not itself forward packets between interfaces.
94 Forwarding can be enabled by setting the
95 .Xr sysctl 8
96 variables
97 .Em net.inet.ip.forwarding
98 and/or
99 .Em net.inet6.ip6.forwarding
100 to 1.
101 Set them permanently in
102 .Xr sysctl.conf 5 .
103 .Pp
104 The
105 .Nm
106 utility provides several commands.
107 The options are as follows:
108 .Bl -tag -width Ds
109 .It Fl A
110 Load only the queue rules present in the rule file.
111 Other rules and options are ignored.
112 .It Fl a Ar anchor
113 Apply flags
114 .Fl f ,
115 .Fl F ,
116 and
117 .Fl s
118 only to the rules in the specified
119 .Ar anchor .
120 In addition to the main ruleset,
121 .Nm
122 can load and manipulate additional rulesets by name,
123 called anchors.
124 The main ruleset is the default anchor.
125 .Pp
126 Anchors are referenced by name and may be nested,
127 with the various components of the anchor path separated by
128 .Sq /
129 characters, similar to how file system hierarchies are laid out.
130 The last component of the anchor path is where ruleset operations are
131 performed.
132 .Pp
133 Evaluation of
134 .Ar anchor
135 rules from the main ruleset is described in
136 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
137 .Pp
138 For example, the following will show all filter rules (see the
139 .Fl s
140 flag below) inside the anchor
141 .Dq authpf/smith(1234) ,
142 which would have been created for user
143 .Dq smith
144 by
145 .Xr authpf 8 ,
146 PID 1234:
147 .Bd -literal -offset indent
148 # pfctl -a "authpf/smith(1234)" -s rules
149 .Ed
150 .Pp
151 Private tables can also be put inside anchors, either by having table
152 statements in the
153 .Xr pf.conf 5
154 file that is loaded in the anchor, or by using regular table commands, as in:
155 .Bd -literal -offset indent
156 # pfctl -a foo/bar -t mytable -T add 1.2.3.4 5.6.7.8
157 .Ed
158 .Pp
159 When a rule referring to a table is loaded in an anchor, the rule will use the
160 private table if one is defined, and then fall back to the table defined in the
161 main ruleset, if there is one.
162 This is similar to C rules for variable scope.
163 It is possible to create distinct tables with the same name in the global
164 ruleset and in an anchor, but this is often bad design and a warning will be
165 issued in that case.
166 .Pp
167 By default, recursive inline printing of anchors applies only to unnamed
168 anchors specified inline in the ruleset.
169 If the anchor name is terminated with a
170 .Sq *
171 character, the
172 .Fl s
173 flag will recursively print all anchors in a brace delimited block.
174 For example the following will print the
175 .Dq authpf
176 ruleset recursively:
177 .Bd -literal -offset indent
178 # pfctl -a 'authpf/*' -sr
179 .Ed
180 .Pp
181 To print the main ruleset recursively, specify only
182 .Sq *
183 as the anchor name:
184 .Bd -literal -offset indent
185 # pfctl -a '*' -sr
186 .Ed
187 .It Fl D Ar macro Ns = Ns Ar value
188 Define
189 .Ar macro
190 to be set to
191 .Ar value
192 on the command line.
193 Overrides the definition of
194 .Ar macro
195 in the ruleset.
196 .It Fl d
197 Disable the packet filter.
198 .It Fl e
199 Enable the packet filter.
200 .It Fl F Ar modifier
201 Flush the filter parameters specified by
202 .Ar modifier
203 (may be abbreviated):
204 .Pp
205 .Bl -tag -width xxxxxxxxxxxx -compact
206 .It Fl F Cm nat
207 Flush the NAT rules.
208 .It Fl F Cm queue
209 Flush the queue rules.
210 .It Fl F Cm rules
211 Flush the filter rules.
212 .It Fl F Cm state
213 Flush the state table (NAT and filter).
214 .It Fl F Cm Sources
215 Flush the source tracking table.
216 .It Fl F Cm info
217 Flush the filter information (statistics that are not bound to rules).
218 .It Fl F Cm Tables
219 Flush the tables.
220 .It Fl F Cm osfp
221 Flush the passive operating system fingerprints.
222 .It Fl F Cm all
223 Flush all of the above.
224 .El
225 .It Fl f Ar file
226 Load the rules contained in
227 .Ar file .
228 This
229 .Ar file
230 may contain macros, tables, options, and normalization, queueing,
231 translation, and filtering rules.
232 With the exception of macros and tables, the statements must appear in that
233 order.
234 .It Fl g
235 Include output helpful for debugging.
236 .It Fl h
237 Help.
238 .It Fl i Ar interface
239 Restrict the operation to the given
240 .Ar interface .
241 .It Fl K Ar host | network
242 Kill all of the source tracking entries originating from the specified
243 .Ar host
244 or
245 .Ar network .
246 A second
247 .Fl K Ar host
248 or
249 .Fl K Ar network
250 option may be specified, which will kill all the source tracking
251 entries from the first host/network to the second.
252 .It Fl k Ar host | network
253 Kill all of the state entries originating from the specified
254 .Ar host
255 or
256 .Ar network .
257 A second
258 .Fl k Ar host
259 or
260 .Fl k Ar network
261 option may be specified, which will kill all the state entries
262 from the first host/network to the second.
263 For example, to kill all of the state entries originating from
264 .Dq host :
265 .Pp
266 .Dl # pfctl -k host
267 .Pp
268 To kill all of the state entries from
269 .Dq host1
270 to
271 .Dq host2 :
272 .Pp
273 .Dl # pfctl -k host1 -k host2
274 .Pp
275 To kill all states originating from 192.168.1.0/24 to 172.16.0.0/16:
276 .Pp
277 .Dl # pfctl -k 192.168.1.0/24 -k 172.16.0.0/16
278 .Pp
279 A network prefix length of 0 can be used as a wildcard.
280 To kill all states with the target
281 .Dq host2 :
282 .Pp
283 .Dl # pfctl -k 0.0.0.0/0 -k host2
284 .It Fl m
285 Merge in explicitly given options without resetting those
286 which are omitted.
287 Allows single options to be modified without disturbing the others:
288 .Bd -literal -offset indent
289 # echo "set loginterface fxp0" | pfctl -mf -
290 .Ed
291 .It Fl N
292 Load only the NAT rules present in the rule file.
293 Other rules and options are ignored.
294 .It Fl n
295 Do not actually load rules, just parse them.
296 .It Fl O
297 Load only the options present in the rule file.
298 Other rules and options are ignored.
299 .It Fl o Op Ar level
300 Control the ruleset optimizer.
301 The ruleset optimizer attempts to improve rulesets by removing rule
302 duplication and making better use of rule ordering.
303 .Pp
304 .Bl -tag -width xxxxxxxxxxxx -compact
305 .It Fl o Cm none
306 Disable the ruleset optimizer.
307 .It Fl o Cm basic
308 Enable basic ruleset optimizations.
309 .It Fl o Cm profile
310 Enable basic ruleset optimizations with profiling.
311 .El
312 .Pp
313 .Cm basic
314 optimization does does four things:
315 .Pp
316 .Bl -enum -compact
317 .It
318 remove duplicate rules
319 .It
320 remove rules that are a subset of another rule
321 .It
322 combine multiple rules into a table when advantageous
323 .It
324 re-order the rules to improve evaluation performance
325 .El
326 .Pp
327 If
328 .Cm profile
329 is specified, the currently loaded ruleset will be examined as a feedback
330 profile to tailor the optimization of the
331 .Ar quick
332 rules to the actual network behavior.
333 .Pp
334 It is important to note that the ruleset optimizer will modify the ruleset
335 to improve performance.
336 A side effect of the ruleset modification is that per-rule accounting
337 statistics will have different meanings than before.
338 If per-rule accounting is important for billing purposes or whatnot, either
339 the ruleset optimizer should not be used or a
340 .Ar label
341 field should be added to all of the accounting rules to act as optimization
342 barriers.
343 .Pp
344 To retain compatibility with previous behaviour, a single
345 .Fl o
346 without any options will enable
347 .Cm basic
348 optimizations, and a second
349 .Fl o
350 will enable profiling.
351 .It Fl p Ar device
352 Use the device file
353 .Ar device
354 instead of the default
355 .Pa /dev/pf .
356 .It Fl q
357 Only print errors and warnings.
358 .It Fl R
359 Load only the filter rules present in the rule file.
360 Other rules and options are ignored.
361 .It Fl r
362 Perform reverse DNS lookups on states when displaying them.
363 .It Fl s Ar modifier
364 Show the filter parameters specified by
365 .Ar modifier
366 (may be abbreviated):
367 .Pp
368 .Bl -tag -width xxxxxxxxxxxxx -compact
369 .It Fl s Cm nat
370 Show the currently loaded NAT rules.
371 .It Fl s Cm queue
372 Show the currently loaded queue rules.
373 When used together with
374 .Fl v ,
375 per-queue statistics are also shown.
376 When used together with
377 .Fl v v ,
378 .Nm
379 will loop and show updated queue statistics every five seconds, including
380 measured bandwidth and packets per second.
381 .It Fl s Cm rules
382 Show the currently loaded filter rules.
383 When used together with
384 .Fl v ,
385 the per-rule statistics (number of evaluations,
386 packets and bytes) are also shown.
387 Note that the
388 .Dq skip step
389 optimization done automatically by the kernel
390 will skip evaluation of rules where possible.
391 Packets passed statefully are counted in the rule that created the state
392 (even though the rule isn't evaluated more than once for the entire
393 connection).
394 .It Fl s Cm Anchors
395 Show the currently loaded anchors directly attached to the main ruleset.
396 If
397 .Fl a Ar anchor
398 is specified as well, the anchors loaded directly below the given
399 .Ar anchor
400 are shown instead.
401 If
402 .Fl v
403 is specified, all anchors attached under the target anchor will be
404 displayed recursively.
405 .It Fl s Cm state
406 Show the contents of the state table.
407 .It Fl s Cm Sources
408 Show the contents of the source tracking table.
409 .It Fl s Cm info
410 Show filter information (statistics and counters).
411 When used together with
412 .Fl v ,
413 source tracking statistics are also shown.
414 .It Fl s Cm labels
415 Show per-rule statistics (label, evaluations, packets total, bytes total,
416 packets in, bytes in, packets out, bytes out) of
417 filter rules with labels, useful for accounting.
418 .It Fl s Cm timeouts
419 Show the current global timeouts.
420 .It Fl s Cm memory
421 Show the current pool memory hard limits.
422 .It Fl s Cm Tables
423 Show the list of tables.
424 .It Fl s Cm osfp
425 Show the list of operating system fingerprints.
426 .It Fl s Cm Interfaces
427 Show the list of interfaces and interface drivers available to PF.
428 When used together with
429 .Fl v ,
430 it additionally lists which interfaces have skip rules activated.
431 When used together with
432 .Fl vv ,
433 interface statistics are also shown.
434 .Fl i
435 can be used to select an interface or a group of interfaces.
436 .It Fl s Cm all
437 Show all of the above, except for the lists of interfaces and operating
438 system fingerprints.
439 .El
440 .It Fl T Ar command Op Ar address ...
441 Specify the
442 .Ar command
443 (may be abbreviated) to apply to the table.
444 Commands include:
445 .Pp
446 .Bl -tag -width xxxxxxxxxxxx -compact
447 .It Fl T Cm kill
448 Kill a table.
449 .It Fl T Cm flush
450 Flush all addresses of a table.
451 .It Fl T Cm add
452 Add one or more addresses in a table.
453 Automatically create a nonexisting table.
454 .It Fl T Cm delete
455 Delete one or more addresses from a table.
456 .It Fl T Cm expire Ar number
457 Delete addresses which had their statistics cleared more than
458 .Ar number
459 seconds ago.
460 For entries which have never had their statistics cleared,
461 .Ar number
462 refers to the time they were added to the table.
463 .It Fl T Cm replace
464 Replace the addresses of the table.
465 Automatically create a nonexisting table.
466 .It Fl T Cm show
467 Show the content (addresses) of a table.
468 .It Fl T Cm test
469 Test if the given addresses match a table.
470 .It Fl T Cm zero
471 Clear all the statistics of a table.
472 .It Fl T Cm load
473 Load only the table definitions from
474 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
475 This is used in conjunction with the
476 .Fl f
477 flag, as in:
478 .Bd -literal -offset indent
479 # pfctl -Tl -f pf.conf
480 .Ed
481 .El
482 .Pp
483 For the
484 .Cm add ,
485 .Cm delete ,
486 .Cm replace ,
487 and
488 .Cm test
489 commands, the list of addresses can be specified either directly on the command
490 line and/or in an unformatted text file, using the
491 .Fl f
492 flag.
493 Comments starting with a
494 .Sq #
495 are allowed in the text file.
496 With these commands, the
497 .Fl v
498 flag can also be used once or twice, in which case
499 .Nm
500 will print the
501 detailed result of the operation for each individual address, prefixed by
502 one of the following letters:
503 .Pp
504 .Bl -tag -width XXX -compact
505 .It A
506 The address/network has been added.
507 .It C
508 The address/network has been changed (negated).
509 .It D
510 The address/network has been deleted.
511 .It M
512 The address matches
513 .Po
514 .Cm test
515 operation only
516 .Pc .
517 .It X
518 The address/network is duplicated and therefore ignored.
519 .It Y
520 The address/network cannot be added/deleted due to conflicting
521 .Sq \&!
522 attributes.
523 .It Z
524 The address/network has been cleared (statistics).
525 .El
526 .Pp
527 Each table maintains a set of counters that can be retrieved using the
528 .Fl v
529 flag of
530 .Nm .
531 For example, the following commands define a wide open firewall which will keep
532 track of packets going to or coming from the
533 .Ox
534 FTP server.
535 The following commands configure the firewall and send 10 pings to the FTP
536 server:
537 .Bd -literal -offset indent
538 # printf "table <test> { ftp.openbsd.org }\en \e
539     pass out to <test>\en" | pfctl -f-
540 # ping -qc10 ftp.openbsd.org
541 .Ed
542 .Pp
543 We can now use the table
544 .Cm show
545 command to output, for each address and packet direction, the number of packets
546 and bytes that are being passed or blocked by rules referencing the table.
547 The time at which the current accounting started is also shown with the
548 .Dq Cleared
549 line.
550 .Bd -literal -offset indent
551 # pfctl -t test -vTshow
552    129.128.5.191
553     Cleared:     Thu Feb 13 18:55:18 2003
554     In/Block:    [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
555     In/Pass:     [ Packets: 10       Bytes: 840      ]
556     Out/Block:   [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
557     Out/Pass:    [ Packets: 10       Bytes: 840      ]
558 .Ed
559 .Pp
560 Similarly, it is possible to view global information about the tables
561 by using the
562 .Fl v
563 modifier twice and the
564 .Fl s
565 .Cm Tables
566 command.
567 This will display the number of addresses on each table,
568 the number of rules which reference the table, and the global
569 packet statistics for the whole table:
570 .Bd -literal -offset indent
571 # pfctl -vvsTables
572 --a-r-  test
573     Addresses:   1
574     Cleared:     Thu Feb 13 18:55:18 2003
575     References:  [ Anchors: 0        Rules: 1        ]
576     Evaluations: [ NoMatch: 3496     Match: 1        ]
577     In/Block:    [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
578     In/Pass:     [ Packets: 10       Bytes: 840      ]
579     In/XPass:    [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
580     Out/Block:   [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
581     Out/Pass:    [ Packets: 10       Bytes: 840      ]
582     Out/XPass:   [ Packets: 0        Bytes: 0        ]
583 .Ed
584 .Pp
585 As we can see here, only one packet \- the initial ping request \- matched the
586 table, but all packets passing as the result of the state are correctly
587 accounted for.
588 Reloading the table(s) or ruleset will not affect packet accounting in any way.
589 The two
590 .Dq XPass
591 counters are incremented instead of the
592 .Dq Pass
593 counters when a
594 .Dq stateful
595 packet is passed but doesn't match the table anymore.
596 This will happen in our example if someone flushes the table while the
597 .Xr ping 8
598 command is running.
599 .Pp
600 When used with a single
601 .Fl v ,
602 .Nm
603 will only display the first line containing the table flags and name.
604 The flags are defined as follows:
605 .Pp
606 .Bl -tag -width XXX -compact
607 .It c
608 For constant tables, which cannot be altered outside
609 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
610 .It p
611 For persistent tables, which don't get automatically killed when no rules
612 refer to them.
613 .It a
614 For tables which are part of the
615 .Em active
616 tableset.
617 Tables without this flag do not really exist, cannot contain addresses, and are
618 only listed if the
619 .Fl g
620 flag is given.
621 .It i
622 For tables which are part of the
623 .Em inactive
624 tableset.
625 This flag can only be witnessed briefly during the loading of
626 .Xr pf.conf 5 .
627 .It r
628 For tables which are referenced (used) by rules.
629 .It h
630 This flag is set when a table in the main ruleset is hidden by one or more
631 tables of the same name from anchors attached below it.
632 .El
633 .It Fl t Ar table
634 Specify the name of the table.
635 .It Fl v
636 Produce more verbose output.
637 A second use of
638 .Fl v
639 will produce even more verbose output including ruleset warnings.
640 See the previous section for its effect on table commands.
641 .It Fl x Ar level
642 Set the debug
643 .Ar level
644 (may be abbreviated) to one of the following:
645 .Pp
646 .Bl -tag -width xxxxxxxxxxxx -compact
647 .It Fl x Cm none
648 Don't generate debug messages.
649 .It Fl x Cm urgent
650 Generate debug messages only for serious errors.
651 .It Fl x Cm misc
652 Generate debug messages for various errors.
653 .It Fl x Cm loud
654 Generate debug messages for common conditions.
655 .El
656 .It Fl z
657 Clear per-rule statistics.
658 .El
659 .Sh FILES
660 .Bl -tag -width "/etc/pf.conf" -compact
661 .It Pa /etc/pf.conf
662 Packet filter rules file.
663 .It Pa /etc/pf.os
664 Passive operating system fingerprint database.
665 .El
666 .Sh SEE ALSO
667 .Xr pf 4 ,
668 .Xr pf.conf 5 ,
669 .Xr pf.os 5 ,
670 .Xr rc.conf 5 ,
671 .Xr sysctl.conf 5 ,
672 .Xr authpf 8 ,
673 .Xr ftp-proxy 8 ,
674 .Xr rc 8 ,
675 .Xr sysctl 8
676 .Sh HISTORY
677 The
678 .Nm
679 program and the
680 .Xr pf 4
681 filter mechanism first appeared in
682 .Ox 3.0 .