Upgrade Texinfo from 4.8 to 4.13 on the vendor branch vendor/TEXINFO
authorJohn Marino <draco@marino.st>
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 21:52:02 +0000 (23:52 +0200)
committerJohn Marino <draco@marino.st>
Sun, 1 May 2011 14:06:10 +0000 (16:06 +0200)
174 files changed:
contrib/texinfo/AUTHORS [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/COPYING
contrib/texinfo/README.DELETED [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/README.DRAGONFLY [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/doc/README [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/doc/fdl.texi
contrib/texinfo/doc/info-stnd.texi
contrib/texinfo/doc/info.1
contrib/texinfo/doc/info.5
contrib/texinfo/doc/info.texi
contrib/texinfo/doc/infokey.1
contrib/texinfo/doc/install-info.1
contrib/texinfo/doc/makeinfo.1
contrib/texinfo/doc/pdftexi2dvi.1 [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2dvi.1 [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2pdf.1 [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/doc/texindex.1
contrib/texinfo/doc/texinfo.5
contrib/texinfo/doc/texinfo.tex [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/doc/texinfo.txi
contrib/texinfo/doc/version-stnd.texi
contrib/texinfo/doc/version.texi
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/argz.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/error.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/error.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/exitfail.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/exitfail.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/getopt.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/getopt1.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/getopt_int.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/gettext.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/intprops.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/localcharset.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/localcharset.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/malloc.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/malloca.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/malloca.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/malloca.valgrind [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbchar.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbchar.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbiter.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbscasecmp.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbschr.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbslen.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbsncasecmp.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbsstr.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbswidth.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbswidth.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mbuiter.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/memchr.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/memcmp.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/memcpy.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/memmem.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/memmove.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mempcpy.c [moved from contrib/texinfo/lib/xstrdup.c with 56% similarity]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/mkstemp.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/str-kmp.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/str-two-way.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/streq.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/strnlen1.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/strnlen1.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/tempname.c [moved from contrib/texinfo/lib/tempname.c with 81% similarity]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/tempname.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/unitypes.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/uniwidth.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/uniwidth/cjk.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/uniwidth/width.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/wcwidth.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/xalloc-die.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/xalloc.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/xmalloc.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/xsetenv.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/gnulib/lib/xsetenv.h [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/info/README [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/info/dir.c
contrib/texinfo/info/display.c
contrib/texinfo/info/display.h
contrib/texinfo/info/doc.c [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/info/doc.h
contrib/texinfo/info/dribble.c
contrib/texinfo/info/dribble.h
contrib/texinfo/info/echo-area.c
contrib/texinfo/info/echo-area.h
contrib/texinfo/info/filesys.c
contrib/texinfo/info/filesys.h
contrib/texinfo/info/footnotes.c
contrib/texinfo/info/footnotes.h
contrib/texinfo/info/funs.h [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/info/gc.c
contrib/texinfo/info/gc.h
contrib/texinfo/info/indices.c
contrib/texinfo/info/indices.h
contrib/texinfo/info/info-utils.c
contrib/texinfo/info/info-utils.h
contrib/texinfo/info/info.c
contrib/texinfo/info/info.h
contrib/texinfo/info/infodoc.c
contrib/texinfo/info/infokey.c
contrib/texinfo/info/infokey.h
contrib/texinfo/info/infomap.c
contrib/texinfo/info/infomap.h
contrib/texinfo/info/key.c [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/info/key.h
contrib/texinfo/info/m-x.c
contrib/texinfo/info/makedoc.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/info/man.c
contrib/texinfo/info/man.h
contrib/texinfo/info/nodemenu.c
contrib/texinfo/info/nodes.c
contrib/texinfo/info/nodes.h
contrib/texinfo/info/pcterm.c [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/texinfo/info/search.c
contrib/texinfo/info/search.h
contrib/texinfo/info/session.c
contrib/texinfo/info/session.h
contrib/texinfo/info/signals.c
contrib/texinfo/info/signals.h
contrib/texinfo/info/termdep.h
contrib/texinfo/info/terminal.c
contrib/texinfo/info/terminal.h
contrib/texinfo/info/tilde.c
contrib/texinfo/info/tilde.h
contrib/texinfo/info/variables.c
contrib/texinfo/info/variables.h
contrib/texinfo/info/window.c
contrib/texinfo/info/window.h
contrib/texinfo/install-info/install-info.c [moved from contrib/texinfo/util/install-info.c with 52% similarity]
contrib/texinfo/lib/README [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/lib/gettext.h [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/lib/substring.c
contrib/texinfo/lib/xalloc.h [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/lib/xexit.c
contrib/texinfo/lib/xmalloc.c [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/README [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/cmds.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/cmds.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/defun.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/defun.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/files.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/files.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/float.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/float.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/footnote.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/footnote.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/html.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/html.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/index.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/index.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/insertion.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/insertion.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/lang.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/lang.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/macro.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/macro.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/makeinfo.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/makeinfo.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/multi.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/multi.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/node.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/node.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/sectioning.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/sectioning.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/toc.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/toc.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/xml.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/xml.h
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/xref.c
contrib/texinfo/makeinfo/xref.h
contrib/texinfo/system.h [moved from contrib/texinfo/lib/system.h with 77% similarity]
contrib/texinfo/util/README [deleted file]
contrib/texinfo/util/pdftexi2dvi [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/texinfo/util/texi2dvi [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/texinfo/util/texi2pdf [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/texinfo/util/texindex.c

diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/AUTHORS b/contrib/texinfo/AUTHORS
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ce8ee85..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-$Id: AUTHORS,v 1.10 2004/04/11 17:56:45 karl Exp $
-Texinfo authors.
-
-  Copyright (C) 2003 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-  
-  Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification,
-  are permitted in any medium without royalty provided the copyright
-  notice and this notice are preserved.
-
-Akim Demaille          texi2dvi.
-Alper Ersoy            makeinfo: enhancements in all files, especially
-                          html-, xml-, and docbook-related.
-Andreas Schwab         texinfo.tex, configure.ac, most makeinfo files.
-Bob Chassell           texinfo.tex, original texinfo.txi.
-Brian Fox              all makeinfo/* and info/* files, info-stnd.texi.
-Dave Love              original makeinfo/html.[ch].
-Eli Zaretskii          all files.
-Karl Berry             all files.
-Karl Heinz Marbaise    original makeinfo language support, most files.
-Noah Friedman          original texi2dvi.
-Paul Rubin             original makeinfo/multi.c.
-Philippe Martin                original makeinfo xml/docbook output.
-Richard Stallman       original texinfo.tex, install-info.c,
-                       texindex.c, texinfo.txi.
-Zack Weinberg          texinfo.tex: @macro implementation.
-
-See http://www.iro.umontreal.ca/contrib/po/HTML/team-LL.html for the
-translation teams for a given language LL.
-
-Many files included in the Texinfo distribution are copied from other
-locations, no author information is given for those.  See util/srclist*.
index d60c31a..9a2708d 100644 (file)
                    GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
-                      Version 2, June 1991
+                      Version 3, 29 June 2007
 
- Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-     59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
+ Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. <http://fsf.org/>
  Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
  of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
 
                            Preamble
 
-  The licenses for most software are designed to take away your
-freedom to share and change it.  By contrast, the GNU General Public
-License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free
-software--to make sure the software is free for all its users.  This
-General Public License applies to most of the Free Software
-Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to
-using it.  (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by
-the GNU Library General Public License instead.)  You can apply it to
+  The GNU General Public License is a free, copyleft license for
+software and other kinds of works.
+
+  The licenses for most software and other practical works are designed
+to take away your freedom to share and change the works.  By contrast,
+the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to
+share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free
+software for all its users.  We, the Free Software Foundation, use the
+GNU General Public License for most of our software; it applies also to
+any other work released this way by its authors.  You can apply it to
 your programs, too.
 
   When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not
 price.  Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you
 have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for
-this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it
-if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it
-in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things.
+them if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you
+want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new
+free programs, and that you know you can do these things.
 
-  To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid
-anyone to deny you these rights or to ask you to surrender the rights.
-These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you
-distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it.
+  To protect your rights, we need to prevent others from denying you
+these rights or asking you to surrender the rights.  Therefore, you have
+certain responsibilities if you distribute copies of the software, or if
+you modify it: responsibilities to respect the freedom of others.
 
   For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether
-gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients all the rights that
-you have.  You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the
-source code.  And you must show them these terms so they know their
-rights.
-
-  We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and
-(2) offer you this license which gives you legal permission to copy,
-distribute and/or modify the software.
-
-  Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain
-that everyone understands that there is no warranty for this free
-software.  If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we
-want its recipients to know that what they have is not the original, so
-that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original
-authors' reputations.
-
-  Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software
-patents.  We wish to avoid the danger that redistributors of a free
-program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the
-program proprietary.  To prevent this, we have made it clear that any
-patent must be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at all.
+gratis or for a fee, you must pass on to the recipients the same
+freedoms that you received.  You must make sure that they, too, receive
+or can get the source code.  And you must show them these terms so they
+know their rights.
+
+  Developers that use the GNU GPL protect your rights with two steps:
+(1) assert copyright on the software, and (2) offer you this License
+giving you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify it.
+
+  For the developers' and authors' protection, the GPL clearly explains
+that there is no warranty for this free software.  For both users' and
+authors' sake, the GPL requires that modified versions be marked as
+changed, so that their problems will not be attributed erroneously to
+authors of previous versions.
+
+  Some devices are designed to deny users access to install or run
+modified versions of the software inside them, although the manufacturer
+can do so.  This is fundamentally incompatible with the aim of
+protecting users' freedom to change the software.  The systematic
+pattern of such abuse occurs in the area of products for individuals to
+use, which is precisely where it is most unacceptable.  Therefore, we
+have designed this version of the GPL to prohibit the practice for those
+products.  If such problems arise substantially in other domains, we
+stand ready to extend this provision to those domains in future versions
+of the GPL, as needed to protect the freedom of users.
+
+  Finally, every program is threatened constantly by software patents.
+States should not allow patents to restrict development and use of
+software on general-purpose computers, but in those that do, we wish to
+avoid the special danger that patents applied to a free program could
+make it effectively proprietary.  To prevent this, the GPL assures that
+patents cannot be used to render the program non-free.
 
   The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and
 modification follow.
-\f
-                   GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
-   TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION
-
-  0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains
-a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed
-under the terms of this General Public License.  The "Program", below,
-refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on the Program"
-means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law:
-that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it,
-either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another
-language.  (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in
-the term "modification".)  Each licensee is addressed as "you".
-
-Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not
-covered by this License; they are outside its scope.  The act of
-running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program
-is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the
-Program (independent of having been made by running the Program).
-Whether that is true depends on what the Program does.
-
-  1. You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program's
-source code as you receive it, in any medium, provided that you
-conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate
-copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the
-notices that refer to this License and to the absence of any warranty;
-and give any other recipients of the Program a copy of this License
-along with the Program.
-
-You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and
-you may at your option offer warranty protection in exchange for a fee.
-
-  2. You may modify your copy or copies of the Program or any portion
-of it, thus forming a work based on the Program, and copy and
-distribute such modifications or work under the terms of Section 1
-above, provided that you also meet all of these conditions:
-
-    a) You must cause the modified files to carry prominent notices
-    stating that you changed the files and the date of any change.
-
-    b) You must cause any work that you distribute or publish, that in
-    whole or in part contains or is derived from the Program or any
-    part thereof, to be licensed as a whole at no charge to all third
-    parties under the terms of this License.
-
-    c) If the modified program normally reads commands interactively
-    when run, you must cause it, when started running for such
-    interactive use in the most ordinary way, to print or display an
-    announcement including an appropriate copyright notice and a
-    notice that there is no warranty (or else, saying that you provide
-    a warranty) and that users may redistribute the program under
-    these conditions, and telling the user how to view a copy of this
-    License.  (Exception: if the Program itself is interactive but
-    does not normally print such an announcement, your work based on
-    the Program is not required to print an announcement.)
-\f
-These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole.  If
-identifiable sections of that work are not derived from the Program,
-and can be reasonably considered independent and separate works in
-themselves, then this License, and its terms, do not apply to those
-sections when you distribute them as separate works.  But when you
-distribute the same sections as part of a whole which is a work based
-on the Program, the distribution of the whole must be on the terms of
-this License, whose permissions for other licensees extend to the
-entire whole, and thus to each and every part regardless of who wrote it.
-
-Thus, it is not the intent of this section to claim rights or contest
-your rights to work written entirely by you; rather, the intent is to
-exercise the right to control the distribution of derivative or
-collective works based on the Program.
-
-In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Program
-with the Program (or with a work based on the Program) on a volume of
-a storage or distribution medium does not bring the other work under
-the scope of this License.
-
-  3. You may copy and distribute the Program (or a work based on it,
-under Section 2) in object code or executable form under the terms of
-Sections 1 and 2 above provided that you also do one of the following:
-
-    a) Accompany it with the complete corresponding machine-readable
-    source code, which must be distributed under the terms of Sections
-    1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for software interchange; or,
-
-    b) Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three
-    years, to give any third party, for a charge no more than your
-    cost of physically performing source distribution, a complete
-    machine-readable copy of the corresponding source code, to be
-    distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium
-    customarily used for software interchange; or,
-
-    c) Accompany it with the information you received as to the offer
-    to distribute corresponding source code.  (This alternative is
-    allowed only for noncommercial distribution and only if you
-    received the program in object code or executable form with such
-    an offer, in accord with Subsection b above.)
-
-The source code for a work means the preferred form of the work for
-making modifications to it.  For an executable work, complete source
-code means all the source code for all modules it contains, plus any
-associated interface definition files, plus the scripts used to
-control compilation and installation of the executable.  However, as a
-special exception, the source code distributed need not include
-anything that is normally distributed (in either source or binary
-form) with the major components (compiler, kernel, and so on) of the
-operating system on which the executable runs, unless that component
-itself accompanies the executable.
-
-If distribution of executable or object code is made by offering
-access to copy from a designated place, then offering equivalent
-access to copy the source code from the same place counts as
-distribution of the source code, even though third parties are not
-compelled to copy the source along with the object code.
-\f
-  4. You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Program
-except as expressly provided under this License.  Any attempt
-otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense or distribute the Program is
-void, and will automatically terminate your rights under this License.
-However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from you under
-this License will not have their licenses terminated so long as such
-parties remain in full compliance.
-
-  5. You are not required to accept this License, since you have not
-signed it.  However, nothing else grants you permission to modify or
-distribute the Program or its derivative works.  These actions are
-prohibited by law if you do not accept this License.  Therefore, by
-modifying or distributing the Program (or any work based on the
-Program), you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so, and
-all its terms and conditions for copying, distributing or modifying
-the Program or works based on it.
-
-  6. Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the
-Program), the recipient automatically receives a license from the
-original licensor to copy, distribute or modify the Program subject to
-these terms and conditions.  You may not impose any further
-restrictions on the recipients' exercise of the rights granted herein.
-You are not responsible for enforcing compliance by third parties to
+
+                      TERMS AND CONDITIONS
+
+  0. Definitions.
+
+  "This License" refers to version 3 of the GNU General Public License.
+
+  "Copyright" also means copyright-like laws that apply to other kinds of
+works, such as semiconductor masks.
+  "The Program" refers to any copyrightable work licensed under this
+License.  Each licensee is addressed as "you".  "Licensees" and
+"recipients" may be individuals or organizations.
+
+  To "modify" a work means to copy from or adapt all or part of the work
+in a fashion requiring copyright permission, other than the making of an
+exact copy.  The resulting work is called a "modified version" of the
+earlier work or a work "based on" the earlier work.
+
+  A "covered work" means either the unmodified Program or a work based
+on the Program.
+
+  To "propagate" a work means to do anything with it that, without
+permission, would make you directly or secondarily liable for
+infringement under applicable copyright law, except executing it on a
+computer or modifying a private copy.  Propagation includes copying,
+distribution (with or without modification), making available to the
+public, and in some countries other activities as well.
+
+  To "convey" a work means any kind of propagation that enables other
+parties to make or receive copies.  Mere interaction with a user through
+a computer network, with no transfer of a copy, is not conveying.
+
+  An interactive user interface displays "Appropriate Legal Notices"
+to the extent that it includes a convenient and prominently visible
+feature that (1) displays an appropriate copyright notice, and (2)
+tells the user that there is no warranty for the work (except to the
+extent that warranties are provided), that licensees may convey the
+work under this License, and how to view a copy of this License.  If
+the interface presents a list of user commands or options, such as a
+menu, a prominent item in the list meets this criterion.
+
+  1. Source Code.
+
+  The "source code" for a work means the preferred form of the work
+for making modifications to it.  "Object code" means any non-source
+form of a work.
+
+  A "Standard Interface" means an interface that either is an official
+standard defined by a recognized standards body, or, in the case of
+interfaces specified for a particular programming language, one that
+is widely used among developers working in that language.
+
+  The "System Libraries" of an executable work include anything, other
+than the work as a whole, that (a) is included in the normal form of
+packaging a Major Component, but which is not part of that Major
+Component, and (b) serves only to enable use of the work with that
+Major Component, or to implement a Standard Interface for which an
+implementation is available to the public in source code form.  A
+"Major Component", in this context, means a major essential component
+(kernel, window system, and so on) of the specific operating system
+(if any) on which the executable work runs, or a compiler used to
+produce the work, or an object code interpreter used to run it.
+
+  The "Corresponding Source" for a work in object code form means all
+the source code needed to generate, install, and (for an executable
+work) run the object code and to modify the work, including scripts to
+control those activities.  However, it does not include the work's
+System Libraries, or general-purpose tools or generally available free
+programs which are used unmodified in performing those activities but
+which are not part of the work.  For example, Corresponding Source
+includes interface definition files associated with source files for
+the work, and the source code for shared libraries and dynamically
+linked subprograms that the work is specifically designed to require,
+such as by intimate data communication or control flow between those
+subprograms and other parts of the work.
+
+  The Corresponding Source need not include anything that users
+can regenerate automatically from other parts of the Corresponding
+Source.
+
+  The Corresponding Source for a work in source code form is that
+same work.
+
+  2. Basic Permissions.
+
+  All rights granted under this License are granted for the term of
+copyright on the Program, and are irrevocable provided the stated
+conditions are met.  This License explicitly affirms your unlimited
+permission to run the unmodified Program.  The output from running a
+covered work is covered by this License only if the output, given its
+content, constitutes a covered work.  This License acknowledges your
+rights of fair use or other equivalent, as provided by copyright law.
+
+  You may make, run and propagate covered works that you do not
+convey, without conditions so long as your license otherwise remains
+in force.  You may convey covered works to others for the sole purpose
+of having them make modifications exclusively for you, or provide you
+with facilities for running those works, provided that you comply with
+the terms of this License in conveying all material for which you do
+not control copyright.  Those thus making or running the covered works
+for you must do so exclusively on your behalf, under your direction
+and control, on terms that prohibit them from making any copies of
+your copyrighted material outside their relationship with you.
+
+  Conveying under any other circumstances is permitted solely under
+the conditions stated below.  Sublicensing is not allowed; section 10
+makes it unnecessary.
+
+  3. Protecting Users' Legal Rights From Anti-Circumvention Law.
+
+  No covered work shall be deemed part of an effective technological
+measure under any applicable law fulfilling obligations under article
+11 of the WIPO copyright treaty adopted on 20 December 1996, or
+similar laws prohibiting or restricting circumvention of such
+measures.
+
+  When you convey a covered work, you waive any legal power to forbid
+circumvention of technological measures to the extent such circumvention
+is effected by exercising rights under this License with respect to
+the covered work, and you disclaim any intention to limit operation or
+modification of the work as a means of enforcing, against the work's
+users, your or third parties' legal rights to forbid circumvention of
+technological measures.
+
+  4. Conveying Verbatim Copies.
+
+  You may convey verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you
+receive it, in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and
+appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate copyright notice;
+keep intact all notices stating that this License and any
+non-permissive terms added in accord with section 7 apply to the code;
+keep intact all notices of the absence of any warranty; and give all
+recipients a copy of this License along with the Program.
+
+  You may charge any price or no price for each copy that you convey,
+and you may offer support or warranty protection for a fee.
+
+  5. Conveying Modified Source Versions.
+
+  You may convey a work based on the Program, or the modifications to
+produce it from the Program, in the form of source code under the
+terms of section 4, provided that you also meet all of these conditions:
+
+    a) The work must carry prominent notices stating that you modified
+    it, and giving a relevant date.
+
+    b) The work must carry prominent notices stating that it is
+    released under this License and any conditions added under section
+    7.  This requirement modifies the requirement in section 4 to
+    "keep intact all notices".
+
+    c) You must license the entire work, as a whole, under this
+    License to anyone who comes into possession of a copy.  This
+    License will therefore apply, along with any applicable section 7
+    additional terms, to the whole of the work, and all its parts,
+    regardless of how they are packaged.  This License gives no
+    permission to license the work in any other way, but it does not
+    invalidate such permission if you have separately received it.
+
+    d) If the work has interactive user interfaces, each must display
+    Appropriate Legal Notices; however, if the Program has interactive
+    interfaces that do not display Appropriate Legal Notices, your
+    work need not make them do so.
+
+  A compilation of a covered work with other separate and independent
+works, which are not by their nature extensions of the covered work,
+and which are not combined with it such as to form a larger program,
+in or on a volume of a storage or distribution medium, is called an
+"aggregate" if the compilation and its resulting copyright are not
+used to limit the access or legal rights of the compilation's users
+beyond what the individual works permit.  Inclusion of a covered work
+in an aggregate does not cause this License to apply to the other
+parts of the aggregate.
+
+  6. Conveying Non-Source Forms.
+
+  You may convey a covered work in object code form under the terms
+of sections 4 and 5, provided that you also convey the
+machine-readable Corresponding Source under the terms of this License,
+in one of these ways:
+
+    a) Convey the object code in, or embodied in, a physical product
+    (including a physical distribution medium), accompanied by the
+    Corresponding Source fixed on a durable physical medium
+    customarily used for software interchange.
+
+    b) Convey the object code in, or embodied in, a physical product
+    (including a physical distribution medium), accompanied by a
+    written offer, valid for at least three years and valid for as
+    long as you offer spare parts or customer support for that product
+    model, to give anyone who possesses the object code either (1) a
+    copy of the Corresponding Source for all the software in the
+    product that is covered by this License, on a durable physical
+    medium customarily used for software interchange, for a price no
+    more than your reasonable cost of physically performing this
+    conveying of source, or (2) access to copy the
+    Corresponding Source from a network server at no charge.
+
+    c) Convey individual copies of the object code with a copy of the
+    written offer to provide the Corresponding Source.  This
+    alternative is allowed only occasionally and noncommercially, and
+    only if you received the object code with such an offer, in accord
+    with subsection 6b.
+
+    d) Convey the object code by offering access from a designated
+    place (gratis or for a charge), and offer equivalent access to the
+    Corresponding Source in the same way through the same place at no
+    further charge.  You need not require recipients to copy the
+    Corresponding Source along with the object code.  If the place to
+    copy the object code is a network server, the Corresponding Source
+    may be on a different server (operated by you or a third party)
+    that supports equivalent copying facilities, provided you maintain
+    clear directions next to the object code saying where to find the
+    Corresponding Source.  Regardless of what server hosts the
+    Corresponding Source, you remain obligated to ensure that it is
+    available for as long as needed to satisfy these requirements.
+
+    e) Convey the object code using peer-to-peer transmission, provided
+    you inform other peers where the object code and Corresponding
+    Source of the work are being offered to the general public at no
+    charge under subsection 6d.
+
+  A separable portion of the object code, whose source code is excluded
+from the Corresponding Source as a System Library, need not be
+included in conveying the object code work.
+
+  A "User Product" is either (1) a "consumer product", which means any
+tangible personal property which is normally used for personal, family,
+or household purposes, or (2) anything designed or sold for incorporation
+into a dwelling.  In determining whether a product is a consumer product,
+doubtful cases shall be resolved in favor of coverage.  For a particular
+product received by a particular user, "normally used" refers to a
+typical or common use of that class of product, regardless of the status
+of the particular user or of the way in which the particular user
+actually uses, or expects or is expected to use, the product.  A product
+is a consumer product regardless of whether the product has substantial
+commercial, industrial or non-consumer uses, unless such uses represent
+the only significant mode of use of the product.
+
+  "Installation Information" for a User Product means any methods,
+procedures, authorization keys, or other information required to install
+and execute modified versions of a covered work in that User Product from
+a modified version of its Corresponding Source.  The information must
+suffice to ensure that the continued functioning of the modified object
+code is in no case prevented or interfered with solely because
+modification has been made.
+
+  If you convey an object code work under this section in, or with, or
+specifically for use in, a User Product, and the conveying occurs as
+part of a transaction in which the right of possession and use of the
+User Product is transferred to the recipient in perpetuity or for a
+fixed term (regardless of how the transaction is characterized), the
+Corresponding Source conveyed under this section must be accompanied
+by the Installation Information.  But this requirement does not apply
+if neither you nor any third party retains the ability to install
+modified object code on the User Product (for example, the work has
+been installed in ROM).
+
+  The requirement to provide Installation Information does not include a
+requirement to continue to provide support service, warranty, or updates
+for a work that has been modified or installed by the recipient, or for
+the User Product in which it has been modified or installed.  Access to a
+network may be denied when the modification itself materially and
+adversely affects the operation of the network or violates the rules and
+protocols for communication across the network.
+
+  Corresponding Source conveyed, and Installation Information provided,
+in accord with this section must be in a format that is publicly
+documented (and with an implementation available to the public in
+source code form), and must require no special password or key for
+unpacking, reading or copying.
+
+  7. Additional Terms.
+
+  "Additional permissions" are terms that supplement the terms of this
+License by making exceptions from one or more of its conditions.
+Additional permissions that are applicable to the entire Program shall
+be treated as though they were included in this License, to the extent
+that they are valid under applicable law.  If additional permissions
+apply only to part of the Program, that part may be used separately
+under those permissions, but the entire Program remains governed by
+this License without regard to the additional permissions.
+
+  When you convey a copy of a covered work, you may at your option
+remove any additional permissions from that copy, or from any part of
+it.  (Additional permissions may be written to require their own
+removal in certain cases when you modify the work.)  You may place
+additional permissions on material, added by you to a covered work,
+for which you have or can give appropriate copyright permission.
+
+  Notwithstanding any other provision of this License, for material you
+add to a covered work, you may (if authorized by the copyright holders of
+that material) supplement the terms of this License with terms:
+
+    a) Disclaiming warranty or limiting liability differently from the
+    terms of sections 15 and 16 of this License; or
+
+    b) Requiring preservation of specified reasonable legal notices or
+    author attributions in that material or in the Appropriate Legal
+    Notices displayed by works containing it; or
+
+    c) Prohibiting misrepresentation of the origin of that material, or
+    requiring that modified versions of such material be marked in
+    reasonable ways as different from the original version; or
+
+    d) Limiting the use for publicity purposes of names of licensors or
+    authors of the material; or
+
+    e) Declining to grant rights under trademark law for use of some
+    trade names, trademarks, or service marks; or
+
+    f) Requiring indemnification of licensors and authors of that
+    material by anyone who conveys the material (or modified versions of
+    it) with contractual assumptions of liability to the recipient, for
+    any liability that these contractual assumptions directly impose on
+    those licensors and authors.
+
+  All other non-permissive additional terms are considered "further
+restrictions" within the meaning of section 10.  If the Program as you
+received it, or any part of it, contains a notice stating that it is
+governed by this License along with a term that is a further
+restriction, you may remove that term.  If a license document contains
+a further restriction but permits relicensing or conveying under this
+License, you may add to a covered work material governed by the terms
+of that license document, provided that the further restriction does
+not survive such relicensing or conveying.
+
+  If you add terms to a covered work in accord with this section, you
+must place, in the relevant source files, a statement of the
+additional terms that apply to those files, or a notice indicating
+where to find the applicable terms.
+
+  Additional terms, permissive or non-permissive, may be stated in the
+form of a separately written license, or stated as exceptions;
+the above requirements apply either way.
+
+  8. Termination.
+
+  You may not propagate or modify a covered work except as expressly
+provided under this License.  Any attempt otherwise to propagate or
+modify it is void, and will automatically terminate your rights under
+this License (including any patent licenses granted under the third
+paragraph of section 11).
+
+  However, if you cease all violation of this License, then your
+license from a particular copyright holder is reinstated (a)
+provisionally, unless and until the copyright holder explicitly and
+finally terminates your license, and (b) permanently, if the copyright
+holder fails to notify you of the violation by some reasonable means
+prior to 60 days after the cessation.
+
+  Moreover, your license from a particular copyright holder is
+reinstated permanently if the copyright holder notifies you of the
+violation by some reasonable means, this is the first time you have
+received notice of violation of this License (for any work) from that
+copyright holder, and you cure the violation prior to 30 days after
+your receipt of the notice.
+
+  Termination of your rights under this section does not terminate the
+licenses of parties who have received copies or rights from you under
+this License.  If your rights have been terminated and not permanently
+reinstated, you do not qualify to receive new licenses for the same
+material under section 10.
+
+  9. Acceptance Not Required for Having Copies.
+
+  You are not required to accept this License in order to receive or
+run a copy of the Program.  Ancillary propagation of a covered work
+occurring solely as a consequence of using peer-to-peer transmission
+to receive a copy likewise does not require acceptance.  However,
+nothing other than this License grants you permission to propagate or
+modify any covered work.  These actions infringe copyright if you do
+not accept this License.  Therefore, by modifying or propagating a
+covered work, you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so.
+
+  10. Automatic Licensing of Downstream Recipients.
+
+  Each time you convey a covered work, the recipient automatically
+receives a license from the original licensors, to run, modify and
+propagate that work, subject to this License.  You are not responsible
+for enforcing compliance by third parties with this License.
+
+  An "entity transaction" is a transaction transferring control of an
+organization, or substantially all assets of one, or subdividing an
+organization, or merging organizations.  If propagation of a covered
+work results from an entity transaction, each party to that
+transaction who receives a copy of the work also receives whatever
+licenses to the work the party's predecessor in interest had or could
+give under the previous paragraph, plus a right to possession of the
+Corresponding Source of the work from the predecessor in interest, if
+the predecessor has it or can get it with reasonable efforts.
+
+  You may not impose any further restrictions on the exercise of the
+rights granted or affirmed under this License.  For example, you may
+not impose a license fee, royalty, or other charge for exercise of
+rights granted under this License, and you may not initiate litigation
+(including a cross-claim or counterclaim in a lawsuit) alleging that
+any patent claim is infringed by making, using, selling, offering for
+sale, or importing the Program or any portion of it.
+
+  11. Patents.
+
+  A "contributor" is a copyright holder who authorizes use under this
+License of the Program or a work on which the Program is based.  The
+work thus licensed is called the contributor's "contributor version".
+
+  A contributor's "essential patent claims" are all patent claims
+owned or controlled by the contributor, whether already acquired or
+hereafter acquired, that would be infringed by some manner, permitted
+by this License, of making, using, or selling its contributor version,
+but do not include claims that would be infringed only as a
+consequence of further modification of the contributor version.  For
+purposes of this definition, "control" includes the right to grant
+patent sublicenses in a manner consistent with the requirements of
 this License.
 
-  7. If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent
-infringement or for any other reason (not limited to patent issues),
-conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or
+  Each contributor grants you a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free
+patent license under the contributor's essential patent claims, to
+make, use, sell, offer for sale, import and otherwise run, modify and
+propagate the contents of its contributor version.
+
+  In the following three paragraphs, a "patent license" is any express
+agreement or commitment, however denominated, not to enforce a patent
+(such as an express permission to practice a patent or covenant not to
+sue for patent infringement).  To "grant" such a patent license to a
+party means to make such an agreement or commitment not to enforce a
+patent against the party.
+
+  If you convey a covered work, knowingly relying on a patent license,
+and the Corresponding Source of the work is not available for anyone
+to copy, free of charge and under the terms of this License, through a
+publicly available network server or other readily accessible means,
+then you must either (1) cause the Corresponding Source to be so
+available, or (2) arrange to deprive yourself of the benefit of the
+patent license for this particular work, or (3) arrange, in a manner
+consistent with the requirements of this License, to extend the patent
+license to downstream recipients.  "Knowingly relying" means you have
+actual knowledge that, but for the patent license, your conveying the
+covered work in a country, or your recipient's use of the covered work
+in a country, would infringe one or more identifiable patents in that
+country that you have reason to believe are valid.
+  
+  If, pursuant to or in connection with a single transaction or
+arrangement, you convey, or propagate by procuring conveyance of, a
+covered work, and grant a patent license to some of the parties
+receiving the covered work authorizing them to use, propagate, modify
+or convey a specific copy of the covered work, then the patent license
+you grant is automatically extended to all recipients of the covered
+work and works based on it.
+
+  A patent license is "discriminatory" if it does not include within
+the scope of its coverage, prohibits the exercise of, or is
+conditioned on the non-exercise of one or more of the rights that are
+specifically granted under this License.  You may not convey a covered
+work if you are a party to an arrangement with a third party that is
+in the business of distributing software, under which you make payment
+to the third party based on the extent of your activity of conveying
+the work, and under which the third party grants, to any of the
+parties who would receive the covered work from you, a discriminatory
+patent license (a) in connection with copies of the covered work
+conveyed by you (or copies made from those copies), or (b) primarily
+for and in connection with specific products or compilations that
+contain the covered work, unless you entered into that arrangement,
+or that patent license was granted, prior to 28 March 2007.
+
+  Nothing in this License shall be construed as excluding or limiting
+any implied license or other defenses to infringement that may
+otherwise be available to you under applicable patent law.
+
+  12. No Surrender of Others' Freedom.
+
+  If conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or
 otherwise) that contradict the conditions of this License, they do not
-excuse you from the conditions of this License.  If you cannot
-distribute so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this
-License and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you
-may not distribute the Program at all.  For example, if a patent
-license would not permit royalty-free redistribution of the Program by
-all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then
-the only way you could satisfy both it and this License would be to
-refrain entirely from distribution of the Program.
-
-If any portion of this section is held invalid or unenforceable under
-any particular circumstance, the balance of the section is intended to
-apply and the section as a whole is intended to apply in other
-circumstances.
-
-It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any
-patents or other property right claims or to contest validity of any
-such claims; this section has the sole purpose of protecting the
-integrity of the free software distribution system, which is
-implemented by public license practices.  Many people have made
-generous contributions to the wide range of software distributed
-through that system in reliance on consistent application of that
-system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing
-to distribute software through any other system and a licensee cannot
-impose that choice.
-
-This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to
-be a consequence of the rest of this License.
-\f
-  8. If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in
-certain countries either by patents or by copyrighted interfaces, the
-original copyright holder who places the Program under this License
-may add an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding
-those countries, so that distribution is permitted only in or among
-countries not thus excluded.  In such case, this License incorporates
-the limitation as if written in the body of this License.
-
-  9. The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions
-of the General Public License from time to time.  Such new versions will
+excuse you from the conditions of this License.  If you cannot convey a
+covered work so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this
+License and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you may
+not convey it at all.  For example, if you agree to terms that obligate you
+to collect a royalty for further conveying from those to whom you convey
+the Program, the only way you could satisfy both those terms and this
+License would be to refrain entirely from conveying the Program.
+
+  13. Use with the GNU Affero General Public License.
+
+  Notwithstanding any other provision of this License, you have
+permission to link or combine any covered work with a work licensed
+under version 3 of the GNU Affero General Public License into a single
+combined work, and to convey the resulting work.  The terms of this
+License will continue to apply to the part which is the covered work,
+but the special requirements of the GNU Affero General Public License,
+section 13, concerning interaction through a network will apply to the
+combination as such.
+
+  14. Revised Versions of this License.
+
+  The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of
+the GNU General Public License from time to time.  Such new versions will
 be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to
 address new problems or concerns.
 
-Each version is given a distinguishing version number.  If the Program
-specifies a version number of this License which applies to it and "any
-later version", you have the option of following the terms and conditions
-either of that version or of any later version published by the Free
-Software Foundation.  If the Program does not specify a version number of
-this License, you may choose any version ever published by the Free Software
-Foundation.
-
-  10. If you wish to incorporate parts of the Program into other free
-programs whose distribution conditions are different, write to the author
-to ask for permission.  For software which is copyrighted by the Free
-Software Foundation, write to the Free Software Foundation; we sometimes
-make exceptions for this.  Our decision will be guided by the two goals
-of preserving the free status of all derivatives of our free software and
-of promoting the sharing and reuse of software generally.
-
-                           NO WARRANTY
-
-  11. BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY
-FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW.  EXCEPT WHEN
-OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES
-PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED
-OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
-MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  THE ENTIRE RISK AS
-TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU.  SHOULD THE
-PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING,
-REPAIR OR CORRECTION.
-
-  12. IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING
-WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR
-REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES,
-INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING
-OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED
-TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY
-YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER
-PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
-POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
+  Each version is given a distinguishing version number.  If the
+Program specifies that a certain numbered version of the GNU General
+Public License "or any later version" applies to it, you have the
+option of following the terms and conditions either of that numbered
+version or of any later version published by the Free Software
+Foundation.  If the Program does not specify a version number of the
+GNU General Public License, you may choose any version ever published
+by the Free Software Foundation.
+
+  If the Program specifies that a proxy can decide which future
+versions of the GNU General Public License can be used, that proxy's
+public statement of acceptance of a version permanently authorizes you
+to choose that version for the Program.
+
+  Later license versions may give you additional or different
+permissions.  However, no additional obligations are imposed on any
+author or copyright holder as a result of your choosing to follow a
+later version.
+
+  15. Disclaimer of Warranty.
+
+  THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY
+APPLICABLE LAW.  EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE COPYRIGHT
+HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY
+OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
+THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
+PURPOSE.  THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM
+IS WITH YOU.  SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF
+ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.
+
+  16. Limitation of Liability.
+
+  IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING
+WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MODIFIES AND/OR CONVEYS
+THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY
+GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE
+USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF
+DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD
+PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS),
+EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
+SUCH DAMAGES.
+
+  17. Interpretation of Sections 15 and 16.
+
+  If the disclaimer of warranty and limitation of liability provided
+above cannot be given local legal effect according to their terms,
+reviewing courts shall apply local law that most closely approximates
+an absolute waiver of all civil liability in connection with the
+Program, unless a warranty or assumption of liability accompanies a
+copy of the Program in return for a fee.
 
                     END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS
-\f
+
            How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
 
   If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest
@@ -287,15 +628,15 @@ free software which everyone can redistribute and change under these terms.
 
   To do so, attach the following notices to the program.  It is safest
 to attach them to the start of each source file to most effectively
-convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least
+state the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least
 the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
 
     <one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.>
     Copyright (C) <year>  <name of author>
 
-    This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+    This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
     it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
-    the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
+    the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
     (at your option) any later version.
 
     This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
@@ -304,37 +645,30 @@ the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
     GNU General Public License for more details.
 
     You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
-    along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
-    Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
-
+    along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
 
 Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.
 
-If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this
-when it starts in an interactive mode:
+  If the program does terminal interaction, make it output a short
+notice like this when it starts in an interactive mode:
 
-    Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) year  name of author
-    Gnomovision comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.
+    <program>  Copyright (C) <year>  <name of author>
+    This program comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.
     This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
     under certain conditions; type `show c' for details.
 
 The hypothetical commands `show w' and `show c' should show the appropriate
-parts of the General Public License.  Of course, the commands you use may
-be called something other than `show w' and `show c'; they could even be
-mouse-clicks or menu items--whatever suits your program.
-
-You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or your
-school, if any, to sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if
-necessary.  Here is a sample; alter the names:
-
-  Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program
-  `Gnomovision' (which makes passes at compilers) written by James Hacker.
-
-  <signature of Ty Coon>, 1 April 1989
-  Ty Coon, President of Vice
-
-This General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into
-proprietary programs.  If your program is a subroutine library, you may
-consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary applications with the
-library.  If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Library General
-Public License instead of this License.
+parts of the General Public License.  Of course, your program's commands
+might be different; for a GUI interface, you would use an "about box".
+
+  You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or school,
+if any, to sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if necessary.
+For more information on this, and how to apply and follow the GNU GPL, see
+<http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
+
+  The GNU General Public License does not permit incorporating your program
+into proprietary programs.  If your program is a subroutine library, you
+may consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary applications with
+the library.  If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Lesser General
+Public License instead of this License.  But first, please read
+<http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/why-not-lgpl.html>.
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/README.DELETED b/contrib/texinfo/README.DELETED
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 879db04..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,97 +0,0 @@
-ABOUT-NLS
-ChangeLog
-ChangeLog.46
-INSTALL
-INSTALL.generic
-INTRODUCTION
-Makefile.am
-Makefile.in
-NEWS
-README.dev
-TODO
-acinclude.m4
-aclocal.m4
-config.guess
-config.in
-config.rpath
-config.sub
-configure
-configure.ac
-depcomp
-dir-example
-djgpp/
-doc/Makefile.am
-doc/Makefile.in
-doc/epsf.tex
-doc/pdfcolor.tex
-doc/texinfo.tex
-doc/txi-cs.tex
-doc/txi-de.tex
-doc/txi-en.tex
-doc/txi-es.tex
-doc/txi-fr.tex
-doc/txi-it.tex
-doc/txi-nl.tex
-doc/txi-no.tex
-doc/txi-pl.tex
-doc/txi-pt.tex
-doc/txi-tr.tex
-doc/macro.texi
-doc/mdate-sh
-doc/stamp-1
-doc/stamp-vti
-doc/texi2dvi.1
-doc/userdoc.texi
-info/Makefile.am
-info/Makefile.in
-info/makedoc.c
-info/pcterm.c
-install-sh
-intl/
-lib/Makefile.am
-lib/Makefile.in
-lib/alloca.c
-lib/getopt.c
-lib/getopt.h
-lib/getopt1.c
-lib/getopt_.h
-lib/getopt_int.h
-lib/memcpy.c
-lib/memmove.c
-lib/mkstemp.c
-lib/strcase.h
-lib/strcasecmp.c
-lib/strdup.c
-lib/strdup.h
-lib/strerror.c
-lib/strncasecmp.c
-m4/
-makeinfo/Makefile.am
-makeinfo/Makefile.in
-makeinfo/tests
-missing
-mkinstalldirs
-po/
-util/Makefile.am
-util/Makefile.in
-util/deref.c
-util/dir-example
-util/fix-info-dir
-util/fixfonts
-util/fixref.gawk
-util/gdoc
-util/gen-dir-node
-util/gendocs.sh
-util/gendocs_template
-util/infosrch*
-util/install-info-html
-util/outline.gawk
-util/prepinfo.awk
-util/tex3patch
-util/texi-docstring-magic.el
-util/texi2dvi
-util/texi2pdf*
-util/texinfo-cat.in
-util/texinfo.dtd
-util/texinfo.xsl
-util/txitextest
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/README.DRAGONFLY b/contrib/texinfo/README.DRAGONFLY
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3fd6088..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,44 +0,0 @@
-
-                       TEXINFO-4.8 AS USED BY DRAGONFLY
-
-    This directory contains a selected set of files from the gnu 
-    texinfo-4.8.tar.gz distribution.   No files have been moved
-    or modified from their extracted position.
-
-    This distribution was downloaded from the following site:
-
-       http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/texinfo
-
-    DO NOT CREATE OR EDIT ANY FILES IN THIS DIRECTORY HIERARCHY!  THIS
-    HIERARCHY REPRESENTS AN EXACT COPY, MINUS UNNEEDED FILES, OF THE
-    ORIGINAL ARCHIVE.  All modifications are made in the 
-    DragonFly build wrapper, in src/gnu/usr.bin/texinfo,
-    by creating overrides or performing surgery on the distribution into
-    local files.  The only additional files added to this directory
-    are README.DRAGONFLY and README.DELETED. 
-
-    UPGRADE PROCEDURE:
-
-       * download a new texinfo-4.X dist greater then 4.8
-
-       * extract the archive into this directory, overlaying the
-         existing files.
-
-       * A 'cvs update' will show you what has changed ('M') relative 
-         to what we had before.  There will be hundreds of files marked
-         '?' which, if not needed, should be deleted and NOT COMMITTED.
-         If any new files are needed you can cvs add and commit them.
-
-       * Check overrides and patches in src/gnu/usr.bin/texinfo and
-         modify as appropriate.
-
-         DO NOT MAKE ANY EDITS TO THE DISTRIBUTION IN THIS CONTRIB
-         DIRECTORY, OTHER THEN TO ADD OR DELETE FILES ASSOCIATED WITH THE
-         GNU DISTRIBUTION.
-
-       * Check to see if src/gnu/usr.bin/texinfo/config.h.proto needs
-         to be modified.
-
-       * Run a full world and make sure info pages display as normal.
-
-    The file README.DELETED contains a list of deleted files.
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/doc/README b/contrib/texinfo/doc/README
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 63f1ba2..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,44 +0,0 @@
-$Id: README,v 1.4 2004/04/11 17:56:45 karl Exp $
-texinfo/doc/README
-
-  Copyright (C) 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-  Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification,
-  are permitted in any medium without royalty provided the copyright
-  notice and this notice are preserved.
-
-This directory contains documentation on the Texinfo system and the TeX
-sources needed to process Texinfo sources.  We recommend using the
-texi2dvi included in this distribution to run a Texinfo manual through
-TeX to produce a DVI file.
-
-The .tex files are not installed automatically because TeX installations
-vary so widely.  Installing them in the wrong place would give a false
-sense of security.  So, you should simply cp *.tex to the appropriate
-place.  If your installation follows the TeX Directory Structure
-standard (http://tug.org/tds/), this will be the directory
-TEXMF/tex/texinfo/ for texinfo.tex, TEXMF/tex/generic/dvips/ for epsf.tex,
-and TEXMF/pdftex/plain/misc for pdfcolor.tex.  If you use the default
-installation paths, TEXMF will be /usr/local/share/texmf.  On systems
-with TeX preinstalled, as most GNU/Linux distributions offer, TEXMF
-will often be something like /usr/share/texmf.
-
-It is also possible to put these .tex files in a `local' place instead
-of overwriting existing ones, but this is more complicated.  See your TeX
-documentation in general and the texmf.cnf file in particular for information.
-
-If you add files to your TeX installations, not just replace existing
-ones, you very likely have to update your ls-R file; do this with the
-mktexlsr command.  In older versions, this was named MakeTeXls-R.
-
-You can get the latest texinfo.tex from
-ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/texinfo/texinfo.tex (and all GNU mirrors)
-ftp://tug.org/tex/texinfo.tex (and all CTAN mirrors)
-or on the FSF machines in /home/gd/gnu/doc/texinfo.tex.
-If you have problems with the version in this distribution, please check
-for a newer version.
-
-epsf.tex comes with dvips distributions, and you may already have it
-installed.  The version here is functionally identical but slightly
-nicer than the one in dvips574.  The changes have been sent to the
-epsf.tex maintainer.
index 11737cc..7b93651 100644 (file)
@@ -1,13 +1,12 @@
-
-@node GNU Free Documentation License
-@appendixsec GNU Free Documentation License
-
-@cindex FDL, GNU Free Documentation License
+@c The GNU Free Documentation License.
 @center Version 1.2, November 2002
 
+@c This file is intended to be included within another document,
+@c hence no sectioning command or @node.  
+
 @display
 Copyright @copyright{} 2000,2001,2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307, USA
+51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA  02110-1301, USA
 
 Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
 of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
@@ -408,7 +407,7 @@ as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation.
 @end enumerate
 
 @page
-@appendixsubsec ADDENDUM: How to use this License for your documents
+@heading ADDENDUM: How to use this License for your documents
 
 To use this License in a document you have written, include a copy of
 the License in the document and put the following copyright and
@@ -427,7 +426,7 @@ license notices just after the title page:
 @end smallexample
 
 If you have Invariant Sections, Front-Cover Texts and Back-Cover Texts,
-replace the ``with...Texts.'' line with this:
+replace the ``with@dots{}Texts.'' line with this:
 
 @smallexample
 @group
index 1a1df6f..0fde962 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-\input texinfo.tex    @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@comment $Id: info-stnd.texi,v 1.9 2004/12/14 16:58:15 karl Exp $
+vb\input texinfo.tex    @c -*-texinfo-*-
+@comment $Id: info-stnd.texi,v 1.24 2008/08/29 17:27:18 karl Exp $
 @c We must \input texinfo.tex instead of texinfo, otherwise make
 @c distcheck in the Texinfo distribution fails, because the texinfo Info
 @c file is made first, and texi2dvi must include . first in the path.
@@ -18,21 +18,26 @@ a program for viewing documents in Info format (usually created from
 Texinfo source files).
 
 Copyright @copyright{} 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002,
-2003, 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 @quotation
 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
-under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or
 any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no
-Invariant Sections, with the Front-Cover texts being ``A GNU Manual,''
+Invariant Sections, with the Front-Cover texts being ``A GNU Manual'',
 and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
 license is included in the section entitled ``GNU Free Documentation
-License.''
+License' in the Texinfo manual.
 
-(a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: ``You have freedom to copy and modify
-this GNU Manual, like GNU software.  Copies published by the Free
-Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
+(a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: ``You have the freedom to
+copy and modify this GNU manual.  Buying copies from the FSF
+supports it in developing GNU and promoting software freedom.''
 @end quotation
+
+This document is part of a collection distributed under the GNU Free
+Documentation License.  If you want to distribute this document
+separately from the collection, you can do so by adding a copy of the
+license to the document, as described in section 6 of the license.
 @end copying
 
 @dircategory Texinfo documentation system
@@ -44,7 +49,7 @@ Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
 @titlepage
 @title GNU Info
 @subtitle for version @value{VERSION}, @value{UPDATED}
-@author Brian J. Fox (bfox@@gnu.org)
+@author Brian J. Fox
 @page
 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
 @insertcopying
@@ -56,16 +61,16 @@ Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
 @node Top
 @top GNU Info
 
-@insertcopying
-
-This documentation is different from the documentation for the Info
-reader that is part of GNU Emacs.  If you do not know how to use Info,
-but have a working Info reader, you should read the Emacs documentation
-first, as it includes more background information and a thorough tutorial.
+If you do not know how to use Info, but have a working Info reader,
+you should read the Info manual before this one (@pxref{Top, Getting
+Started,,info, Info}), as it includes more background information and
+a thorough tutorial.  This documentation describes the stand-alone Info
+reader that is part of the Texinfo distribution, not the Info reader
+that is part of GNU Emacs.
 @end ifnottex
 
 @menu
-* What is Info::                What is Info?
+* Stand-alone Info::            What is Info?
 * Invoking Info::               Options you can pass on the command line.
 * Cursor Commands::             Commands which move the cursor within a node.
 * Scrolling Commands::          Commands for reading the text within a node.
@@ -77,23 +82,32 @@ first, as it includes more background information and a thorough tutorial.
 * Miscellaneous Commands::      A few commands that defy categories.
 * Variables::                   How to change the default behavior of Info.
 * Custom Key Bindings::         How to define your own key-to-command bindings.
-* Copying This Manual::         The GNU Free Documentation License.
-* Index::                       Global index containing keystrokes,
-                                  command names, variable names,
-                                  and general concepts.
+* Index::                       Global index with keystrokes, command names,
+                                  variable names, and general concepts.
 @end menu
 
 
-@node What is Info
-@chapter What is Info?
+@node Stand-alone Info
+@chapter Stand-alone Info
+
+The @dfn{Info} program is a stand-alone program, part of the Texinfo
+distribution, which is used to view Info files on an ASCII terminal.
+@dfn{Info files} are typically the result of processing Texinfo files
+with the program @code{makeinfo} (also in the Texinfo distribution)
 
-@dfn{Info} is a program which is used to view Info files on an ASCII
-terminal.  @dfn{Info files} are the result of processing Texinfo files
-with the program @code{makeinfo} or with one of the Emacs commands, such
-as @code{M-x texinfo-format-buffer}.  Texinfo itself is a documentation
-system that uses a single source file to produce both on-line
-information and printed output.  You can typeset and print the files
-that you read in Info.
+Texinfo itself is a documentation system that uses a single source
+file to produce both on-line information and printed output.  You can
+typeset and print the files that you read in Info.
+
+GNU Emacs also provides an Info reader (just type @kbd{M-x info} in
+Emacs).  Emacs Info and stand-alone Info have nearly identical user
+interfaces, although customization and other details are different
+(this manual explains the stand-alone Info reader).  The Emacs Info
+reader supports the X Window System and other such bitmapped
+interfaces, not just plain ASCII, so if you want the prettiest
+display for Info files, you should try it.  You can use Emacs Info
+without using Emacs for anything else.  (Type @kbd{C-x C-c} to exit;
+this also works in the stand-alone Info reader.)
 
 
 @node Invoking Info
@@ -118,15 +132,16 @@ The program accepts the following options:
 @table @code
 @anchor{--apropos}
 @item --apropos=@var{string}
+@itemx -k @var{string}
 @cindex Searching all indices
 @cindex Info files@r{, searching all indices}
 @cindex Apropos@r{, in Info files}
 Specify a string to search in every index of every Info file installed
-on your system.  Info looks up the named @var{string} in all the indices
-it can find, prints the results to standard output, and then exits.  If
-you are not sure which Info file explains certain issues, this option is
-your friend.  Note that if your system has a lot of Info files
-installed, searching all of them might take some time.
+on your system.  Info looks up the named @var{string} in all the
+indices it can find, prints the results to standard output, and then
+exits.  If you are not sure which Info file explains certain issues,
+this option is your friend.  (If your system has a lot of Info files
+installed, searching all of them might take some time!)
 
 You can invoke the apropos command from inside Info; see
 @ref{Searching Commands}.
@@ -257,6 +272,11 @@ previous Info session (see the description of the @samp{--dribble}
 option above).  When the keystrokes in the files are all read, Info
 reverts its input to the usual interactive operation.
 
+@item --show-malformed-multibytes
+@itemx --no-show-malformed-multibytes
+  Show malformed multibyte sequences in the output.  By default, such
+sequences are dropped.
+
 @anchor{--show-options}
 @cindex command-line options, how to find
 @cindex invocation description, how to find
@@ -339,6 +359,10 @@ index or the invocation node is the file where Info finds itself after
 following all the menu items given on the command line.  This is so
 @samp{info emacs --show-options} does what you'd expect.
 
+Finally, Info defines many default key bindings and variables.
+@xref{Custom Key Bindings}, for information on how to customize these
+settings.
+
 @c FIXME: the feature with lowercasing the file name isn't documented
 
 
@@ -350,11 +374,11 @@ following all the menu items given on the command line.  This is so
 Many people find that reading screens of text page by page is made
 easier when one is able to indicate particular pieces of text with
 some kind of pointing device.  Since this is the case, GNU Info (both
-the Emacs and standalone versions) have several commands which allow
+the Emacs and stand-alone versions) have several commands which allow
 you to move the cursor about the screen.  The notation used in this
 manual to describe keystrokes is identical to the notation used within
 the Emacs manual, and the GNU Readline manual.  @xref{User Input,,,
-emacs, the GNU Emacs Manual}, if you are unfamiliar with the
+emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}, if you are unfamiliar with the
 notation.@footnote{Here's a short summary.  @kbd{C-@var{x}} means
 press the @kbd{CTRL} key and the key @var{x}.  @kbd{M-@var{x}} means
 press the @kbd{META} key and the key @var{x}.  On many terminals th
@@ -366,7 +390,7 @@ The following table lists the basic cursor movement commands in Info.
 Each entry consists of the key sequence you should type to execute the
 cursor movement, the @code{M-x}@footnote{@code{M-x} is also a command; it
 invokes @code{execute-extended-command}.  @xref{M-x, , Executing an
-extended command, emacs, the GNU Emacs Manual}, for more detailed
+extended command, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}, for more detailed
 information.} command name (displayed in parentheses), and a short
 description of what the command does.  All of the cursor motion commands
 can take a @dfn{numeric} argument (see @ref{Miscellaneous Commands,
@@ -379,66 +403,66 @@ given to the @code{next-line} command would cause the cursor to move
 @emph{up} 4 lines.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{C-n} (@code{next-line})
+@item @kbd{C-n} (@code{next-line})
 @itemx @key{DOWN} (an arrow key)
 @kindex C-n
 @kindex DOWN (an arrow key)
 @findex next-line
 Move the cursor down to the next line.
 
-@item @key{C-p} (@code{prev-line})
+@item @kbd{C-p} (@code{prev-line})
 @itemx @key{UP} (an arrow key)
 @kindex C-p
 @kindex UP (an arrow key)
 @findex prev-line
 Move the cursor up to the previous line.
 
-@item @key{C-a} (@code{beginning-of-line})
+@item @kbd{C-a} (@code{beginning-of-line})
 @itemx @key{Home} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex C-a, in Info windows
 @kindex Home
 @findex beginning-of-line
 Move the cursor to the start of the current line.
 
-@item @key{C-e} (@code{end-of-line})
+@item @kbd{C-e} (@code{end-of-line})
 @itemx @key{End} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex C-e, in Info windows
 @kindex End
 @findex end-of-line
 Move the cursor to the end of the current line.
 
-@item @key{C-f} (@code{forward-char})
+@item @kbd{C-f} (@code{forward-char})
 @itemx @key{RIGHT} (an arrow key)
 @kindex C-f, in Info windows
 @kindex RIGHT (an arrow key)
 @findex forward-char
 Move the cursor forward a character.
 
-@item @key{C-b} (@code{backward-char})
+@item @kbd{C-b} (@code{backward-char})
 @itemx @key{LEFT} (an arrow key)
 @kindex C-b, in Info windows
 @kindex LEFT (an arrow key)
 @findex backward-char
 Move the cursor backward a character.
 
-@item @key{M-f} (@code{forward-word})
+@item @kbd{M-f} (@code{forward-word})
 @itemx @kbd{C-@key{RIGHT}} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex M-f, in Info windows
 @kindex C-RIGHT
 @findex forward-word
 Move the cursor forward a word.
 
-@item @key{M-b} (@code{backward-word})
+@item @kbd{M-b} (@code{backward-word})
 @itemx @kbd{C-@key{LEFT}} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex M-b, in Info windows
 @kindex C-LEFT
 @findex backward-word
 Move the cursor backward a word.
 
-@item @key{M-<} (@code{beginning-of-node})
-@itemx @key{C-@key{Home}} (on DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @key{b}
-@itemx @key{M-b}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{M-<} (@code{beginning-of-node})
+@itemx @kbd{C-@key{Home}} (on DOS/Windows only)
+@itemx @kbd{b}
+@itemx @kbd{M-b}, vi-like operation
 @kindex b, in Info windows
 @kindex M-<
 @kindex C-Home
@@ -446,16 +470,16 @@ Move the cursor backward a word.
 @findex beginning-of-node
 Move the cursor to the start of the current node.
 
-@item @key{M->} (@code{end-of-node})
-@itemx @key{C-@key{End}} (on DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @key{e}
+@item @kbd{M->} (@code{end-of-node})
+@itemx @kbd{C-@key{End}} (on DOS/Windows only)
+@itemx @kbd{e}
 @kindex M->
 @kindex e, in Info windows
 @kindex C-End
 @findex end-of-node
 Move the cursor to the end of the current node.
 
-@item @key{M-r} (@code{move-to-window-line})
+@item @kbd{M-r} (@code{move-to-window-line})
 @kindex M-r
 @findex move-to-window-line
 Move the cursor to a specific line of the window.  Without a numeric
@@ -474,9 +498,11 @@ current paragraph you are reading is visible on the screen.  The
 commands detailed in this section are used to shift which part of the
 current node is visible on the screen.
 
-Scrolling commands are bound differently when @samp{--vi-keys} operation
-is in effect (@pxref{--vi-keys}).  These key bindings are designated
-with ``vi-like operation''.
+Scrolling commands are bound differently when @samp{--vi-keys}
+operation is in effect (@pxref{--vi-keys}).  These key bindings are
+designated with ``vi-like operation''.  @xref{Custom Key Bindings},
+for information on arbitrarily customizing key bindings and variable
+settings.
 
 @table @asis
 @item @key{SPC} (@code{scroll-forward})
@@ -498,10 +524,10 @@ invoking the (@code{scroll-forward-page-only-set-window}) command,
 @samp{z} under @samp{--vi-keys}, with a numeric argument.
 
 @item @key{NEXT} (an arrow key) (@code{scroll-forward-page-only})
-@itemx @key{C-v}
-@itemx @key{C-f}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{f}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{M-SPC}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-v}
+@itemx @kbd{C-f}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{f}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-SPC}, vi-like operation
 @kindex NEXT
 @kindex C-v
 @kindex C-f, vi-like operation
@@ -516,7 +542,7 @@ current node.
 The @key{NEXT} key is known as the @key{PageDown} key on some
 keyboards.
 
-@item @key{z} (@code{scroll-forward-page-only-set-window}, vi-like operation)
+@item @kbd{z} (@code{scroll-forward-page-only-set-window}, vi-like operation)
 @kindex z, vi-like operation
 @findex scroll-forward-page-only-set-window
 Scroll forward, like with @key{NEXT}, but if a numeric argument is
@@ -537,9 +563,9 @@ invoking the (@code{scroll-backward-page-only-set-window}) command,
 
 @itemx @key{PREVIOUS} (arrow key) (@code{scroll-backward-page-only})
 @itemx @key{PRIOR} (arrow key)
-@itemx @key{M-v}
-@itemx @key{b}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{C-b}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-v}
+@itemx @kbd{b}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-b}, vi-like operation
 @kindex PREVIOUS
 @kindex M-v
 @kindex b, vi-like operation
@@ -551,15 +577,15 @@ the current node.  The default scroll size can be changed by invoking
 the(@code{scroll-backward-page-only-set-window}) command, @samp{w} under
 @samp{--vi-keys}, with a numeric argument.
 
-@item @key{w} (@code{scroll-backward-page-only-set-window}, vi-like operation)
+@item @kbd{w} (@code{scroll-backward-page-only-set-window}, vi-like operation)
 @kindex w, vi-like operation
 @findex scroll-backward-page-only-set-window
 Scroll backward, like with @key{PREVIOUS}, but if a numeric argument is
 specified, it becomes the default scroll size for subsequent
 @code{scroll-forward} and @code{scroll-backward} commands.
 
-@item @key{C-n} (@code{down-line}, vi-like operation)
-@itemx @key{C-e}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-n} (@code{down-line}, vi-like operation)
+@itemx @kbd{C-e}, vi-like operation
 @itemx @key{RET}, vi-like operation
 @itemx @key{LFD}, vi-like operation
 @itemx @key{DOWN}, vi-like operation
@@ -572,12 +598,12 @@ specified, it becomes the default scroll size for subsequent
 Scroll forward by one line.  With a numeric argument, scroll forward
 that many lines.
 
-@item @key{C-p} (@code{up-line}, vi-like operation)
+@item @kbd{C-p} (@code{up-line}, vi-like operation)
 @itemx @key{UP}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{y}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{k}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{C-k}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{C-y}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{y}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{k}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-k}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-y}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-p, vi-like operation
 @kindex UP, vi-like operation
 @kindex y, vi-like operation
@@ -588,8 +614,8 @@ that many lines.
 Scroll backward one line.  With a numeric argument, scroll backward that
 many lines.
 
-@item @key{d} (@code{scroll-half-screen-down}, vi-like operation)
-@itemx @key{C-d}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{d} (@code{scroll-half-screen-down}, vi-like operation)
+@itemx @kbd{C-d}, vi-like operation
 @kindex d, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-d, vi-like operation
 @findex scroll-half-screen-down
@@ -598,8 +624,8 @@ scroll that many lines.  If an argument is specified, it becomes the new
 default number of lines to scroll for subsequent @samp{d} and @samp{u}
 commands.
 
-@item @key{u} (@code{scroll-half-screen-up}, vi-like operation)
-@itemx @key{C-u}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{u} (@code{scroll-half-screen-up}, vi-like operation)
+@itemx @kbd{C-u}, vi-like operation
 @kindex u, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-u, vi-like operation
 @findex scroll-half-screen-up
@@ -614,8 +640,7 @@ The @code{scroll-forward} and @code{scroll-backward} commands can also
 move forward and backward through the node structure of the file.  If
 you press @key{SPC} while viewing the end of a node, or @key{DEL} while
 viewing the beginning of a node, what happens is controlled by the
-variable @code{scroll-behavior}.  @xref{Variables,
-@code{scroll-behavior}}, for more information.
+variable @code{scroll-behavior} (@pxref{scroll-behavior}).
 
 The @code{scroll-forward-page-only} and @code{scroll-backward-page-only}
 commands never scroll beyond the current node.
@@ -628,11 +653,11 @@ current node.
 
 @kindex BS (backspace)
 If your keyboard lacks the @key{DEL} key, look for a key called
-@key{BS}, or @samp{BackSpace}, sometimes designated with an arrow which
+@key{BS}, or @samp{Backspace}, sometimes designated with an arrow which
 points to the left, which should perform the same function.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{C-l} (@code{redraw-display})
+@item @kbd{C-l} (@code{redraw-display})
 @kindex C-l
 @findex redraw-display
 Redraw the display from scratch, or shift the line containing the cursor
@@ -641,7 +666,7 @@ the screen, and then redraws its entire contents.  Given a numeric
 argument of @var{n}, the line containing the cursor is shifted so that
 it is on the @var{n}th line of the window.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{w}} (@code{toggle-wrap})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{w}} (@code{toggle-wrap})
 @kindex C-w
 @findex toggle-wrap
 Toggles the state of line wrapping in the current window.  Normally,
@@ -675,9 +700,9 @@ are.  Info uses this line to move about the node structure of the file
 when you use the following commands:
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{n} (@code{next-node})
+@item @kbd{n} (@code{next-node})
 @itemx @kbd{C-@key{NEXT}} (on DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @kbd{C-x @key{n}}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-x @kbd{n}}, vi-like operation
 @kindex n
 @kindex C-NEXT
 @kindex C-x n, vi-like operation
@@ -688,7 +713,7 @@ Select the `Next' node.
 The @key{NEXT} key is known as the @key{PgDn} key on some
 keyboards.
 
-@item @key{p} (@code{prev-node})
+@item @kbd{p} (@code{prev-node})
 @itemx @kbd{C-@key{PREVIOUS}} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex p
 @kindex C-PREVIOUS
@@ -699,9 +724,9 @@ Select the `Prev' node.
 The @key{PREVIOUS} key is known as the @key{PgUp} key on some
 keyboards.
 
-@item @key{u} (@code{up-node})
+@item @kbd{u} (@code{up-node})
 @itemx @kbd{C-@key{UP}} (an arrow key on DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @kbd{C-x @key{u}}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-x @kbd{u}}, vi-like operation
 @kindex u
 @kindex C-UP
 @kindex C-x u, vi-like operation
@@ -721,9 +746,9 @@ by the time you get to the first node you visited in a window, the
 entire history of that window is discarded.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{l} (@code{history-node})
-@itemx @key{C-@key{CENTER}} (on DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @key{'}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{l} (@code{history-node})
+@itemx @kbd{C-@key{CENTER}} (on DOS/Windows only)
+@itemx @kbd{'}, vi-like operation
 @kindex l
 @kindex C-CENTER
 @kindex ', vi-like operation
@@ -736,15 +761,15 @@ Two additional commands make it easy to select the most commonly
 selected nodes; they are @samp{t} and @samp{d}.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{t} (@code{top-node})
-@itemx @key{M-t}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{t} (@code{top-node})
+@itemx @kbd{M-t}, vi-like operation
 @kindex t
 @kindex M-t, vi-like operation
 @findex top-node
 Select the node @samp{Top} in the current Info file.
 
-@item @key{d} (@code{dir-node})
-@itemx @key{M-d}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{d} (@code{dir-node})
+@itemx @kbd{M-d}, vi-like operation
 @kindex d
 @kindex M-d, vi-like operation
 @findex dir-node
@@ -755,8 +780,8 @@ Here are some other commands which immediately result in the selection
 of a different node in the current window:
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{<} (@code{first-node})
-@itemx @key{g}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{<} (@code{first-node})
+@itemx @kbd{g}, vi-like operation
 @kindex <
 @kindex g, vi-like operation
 @findex first-node
@@ -765,8 +790,8 @@ often @samp{Top}, but it does not have to be.  With a numeric argument
 @var{N}, select the @var{N}th node (the first node is node 1).  An
 argument of zero is the same as the argument of 1.
 
-@item @key{>} (@code{last-node})
-@itemx @key{G}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{>} (@code{last-node})
+@itemx @kbd{G}, vi-like operation
 @kindex >
 @kindex G, vi-like operation
 @findex last-node
@@ -775,7 +800,7 @@ Select the last node which appears in this file.  With a numeric argument
 argument of zero is the same as no argument, i.e., it selects the last
 node.
 
-@item @key{]} (@code{global-next-node})
+@item @kbd{]} (@code{global-next-node})
 @kindex ]
 @findex global-next-node
 Move forward or down through node structure.  If the node that you are
@@ -784,7 +809,7 @@ Otherwise, if this node has a menu, the first menu item is selected.  If
 there is no @samp{Next} and no menu, the same process is tried with the
 @samp{Up} node of this node.
 
-@item @key{[} (@code{global-prev-node})
+@item @kbd{[} (@code{global-prev-node})
 @kindex [
 @findex global-prev-node
 Move backward or up through node structure.  If the node that you are
@@ -795,13 +820,12 @@ and if it has a menu, the last item in the menu is selected.
 
 You can get the same behavior as @code{global-next-node} and
 @code{global-prev-node} while simply scrolling through the file with
-@key{SPC} and @key{DEL}; @xref{Variables, @code{scroll-behavior}}, for
-more information.
+@key{SPC} and @key{DEL} (@pxref{scroll-behavior}).
 
 @table @asis
 @anchor{goto-node}
-@item @key{g} (@code{goto-node})
-@itemx @kbd{C-x @key{g}}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{g} (@code{goto-node})
+@itemx @kbd{C-x @kbd{g}}, vi-like operation
 @kindex g
 @kindex C-x g, vi-like operation
 @findex goto-node
@@ -819,8 +843,8 @@ must include the Info file of the other file.  For example,
 finds the node @samp{Buffers} in the Info file @file{emacs}.
 
 @anchor{goto-invocation}
-@item @key{O} (@code{goto-invocation}
-@itemx @key{I}
+@item @kbd{O} (@code{goto-invocation}
+@itemx @kbd{I}
 @kindex O
 @kindex I
 @findex goto-invocation
@@ -842,7 +866,7 @@ know what Info file documents the command, or if invoking @samp{I}
 doesn't display the right node, go to the @samp{(dir)} node (using the
 @samp{d} command) and invoke @samp{I} from there.
 
-@item @key{G} (@code{menu-sequence})
+@item @kbd{G} (@code{menu-sequence})
 @kindex G
 @findex menu-sequence
 @cindex menu, following, from inside Info
@@ -872,7 +896,7 @@ exactly, Info will find it faster.)
 If any of the menu items you type are not found, Info stops at the last
 entry it did find and reports an error.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{k}} (@code{kill-node})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{k}} (@code{kill-node})
 @kindex C-x k
 @findex kill-node
 Kill a node.  The node name is prompted for in the echo area, with a
@@ -900,7 +924,7 @@ Make a window containing a menu of all of the currently visited nodes.
 This window becomes the selected window, and you may use the standard
 Info commands within it.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{b}} (@code{select-visited-node})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{b}} (@code{select-visited-node})
 @kindex C-x b
 @findex select-visited-node
 Select a node which has been previously visited in a visible window.
@@ -918,18 +942,20 @@ entire Info file, search through the indices of an Info file, or find
 areas within an Info file which discuss a particular topic.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{s} (@code{search})
-@itemx @key{/}
+@item @kbd{s} (@code{search})
+@itemx @kbd{/}
 @kindex s
 @kindex /
 @findex search
-Read a string in the echo area and search for it.  If the string
-includes upper-case characters, the Info file is searched
-case-sensitively; otherwise Info ignores the letter case.  With a
-numeric argument of @var{N}, search for @var{N}th occurrence of the
-string.  Negative arguments search backwards.
+@cindex regular expression search
+Read a string in the echo area and search for it, either as a regular
+expression (by default) or a literal string.  If the string includes
+upper-case characters, the Info file is searched case-sensitively;
+otherwise Info ignores the letter case.  With a numeric argument of
+@var{N}, search for @var{N}th occurrence of the string.  Negative
+arguments search backwards.
 
-@item @key{?} (@code{search-backward}, vi-like operation)
+@item @kbd{?} (@code{search-backward}, vi-like operation)
 @kindex ?, vi-like operation
 @findex search-backward
 Read a string in the echo area and search backward through the Info file
@@ -938,7 +964,15 @@ file is searched case-sensitively; otherwise Info ignores the letter
 case.  With a numeric argument of @var{N}, search for @var{N}th
 occurrence of the string.  Negative arguments search forward.
 
-@item @key{S} (@code{search-case-sensitively}
+@item @kbd{R} (@code{toggle-regexp})
+@kindex R
+@findex toggle-regexp
+Toggle between using regular expressions and literal strings for
+searching.  Info uses so-called `extended' regular expression syntax,
+similar to Emacs (@pxref{Regexps, , Using Regular Expressions, emacs,
+The GNU Emacs Manual}).
+
+@item @kbd{S} (@code{search-case-sensitively}
 @kindex S
 @findex search-case-sensitively
 @cindex search, case-sensitive
@@ -948,8 +982,8 @@ if the string includes only lower-case letters.  With a numeric argument
 of @var{N}, search for @var{N}th occurrence of the string.  Negative
 arguments search backwards.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{n}} (@code{search-next})
-@itemx @key{n}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{n}} (@code{search-next})
+@itemx @kbd{n}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-x n
 @kindex n, vi-like operation
 @findex search-next
@@ -958,8 +992,8 @@ Search for the same string used in the last search command, in the same
 direction, and with the same case-sensitivity option.  With a numeric
 argument of @var{N}, search for @var{N}th next occurrence.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{N}} (@code{search-previous})
-@itemx @key{N}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{N}} (@code{search-previous})
+@itemx @kbd{N}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-x N
 @kindex n, vi-like operation
 @findex search-previous
@@ -967,7 +1001,7 @@ Search for the same string used in the last search command, and with the
 same case-sensitivity option, but in the reverse direction.  With a
 numeric argument of @var{N}, search for @var{N}th previous occurrence.
 
-@item @key{C-s} (@code{isearch-forward})
+@item @kbd{C-s} (@code{isearch-forward})
 @kindex C-s
 @findex isearch-forward
 @cindex incremental search
@@ -975,14 +1009,14 @@ Interactively search forward through the Info file for a string as you
 type it.  If the string includes upper-case characters, the search is
 case-sensitive; otherwise Info ignores the letter case.
 
-@item @key{C-r} (@code{isearch-backward})
+@item @kbd{C-r} (@code{isearch-backward})
 @kindex C-r
 @findex isearch-backward
 Interactively search backward through the Info file for a string as
 you type it.  If the string includes upper-case characters, the search
 is case-sensitive; otherwise Info ignores the letter case.
 
-@item @key{i} (@code{index-search})
+@item @kbd{i} (@code{index-search})
 @kindex i
 @findex index-search
 @cindex index, searching
@@ -990,7 +1024,7 @@ is case-sensitive; otherwise Info ignores the letter case.
 Look up a string in the indices for this Info file, and select a node
 to which the found index entry points.
 
-@item @key{,} (@code{next-index-match})
+@item @kbd{,} (@code{next-index-match})
 @kindex ,
 @findex next-index-match
 Move to the node containing the next matching index item from the last
@@ -1113,10 +1147,10 @@ references.
 The following table lists the Info commands which operate on menu items.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{1} (@code{menu-digit})
-@itemx @key{2} @dots{} @key{9}
-@itemx @key{M-1}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{M-2} @dots{} @key{M-9}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{1} (@code{menu-digit})
+@itemx @kbd{2} @dots{} @kbd{9}
+@itemx @kbd{M-1}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-2} @dots{} @kbd{M-9}, vi-like operation
 @cindex 1 @dots{} 9, in Info windows
 @cindex M-1 @dots{} M-9, vi-like operation
 @kindex 1 @dots{} 9, in Info windows
@@ -1128,16 +1162,16 @@ For convenience, there is one exception; pressing @samp{0} selects the
 @emph{last} item in the node's menu.  When @samp{--vi-keys} is in
 effect, digits set the numeric argument, so these commands are remapped
 to their @samp{M-} varieties.  For example, to select the last menu
-item, press @key{M-0}.
+item, press @kbd{M-0}.
 
-@item @key{0} (@code{last-menu-item})
-@itemx @key{M-0}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{0} (@code{last-menu-item})
+@itemx @kbd{M-0}, vi-like operation
 @kindex 0, in Info windows
 @kindex M-0, vi-like operation
 @findex last-menu-item
 Select the last item in the current node's menu.
 
-@item @key{m} (@code{menu-item})
+@item @kbd{m} (@code{menu-item})
 @kindex m
 @findex menu-item
 Reads the name of a menu item in the echo area and selects its node.
@@ -1152,10 +1186,10 @@ Move the cursor to the start of this node's menu.
 This table lists the Info commands which operate on cross references.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{f} (@code{xref-item})
-@itemx @key{r}
-@item @key{M-f}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @kbd{C-x @key{r}}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{f} (@code{xref-item})
+@itemx @kbd{r}
+@item @kbd{M-f}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{C-x @kbd{r}}, vi-like operation
 @kindex f
 @kindex r
 @kindex M-f, vi-like operation
@@ -1176,8 +1210,8 @@ Move the cursor to the start of the next nearest menu item or note
 reference in this node.  You can then use @key{RET}
 (@code{select-reference-this-line}) to select the menu or note reference.
 
-@item @key{M-TAB} (@code{move-to-prev-xref})
-@itemx @key{Shift-@key{TAB}} (on DOS/Windows only)
+@item @kbd{M-TAB} (@code{move-to-prev-xref})
+@itemx @kbd{Shift-@key{TAB}} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex M-TAB, in Info windows
 @findex move-to-prev-xref
 Move the cursor the start of the nearest previous menu item or note
@@ -1189,7 +1223,7 @@ On DOS/Windows only, the @kbd{Shift-@key{TAB}} key is an alias for
 @kbd{M-@key{TAB}}.  This key is sometimes called @samp{BackTab}.
 
 @item @key{RET} (@code{select-reference-this-line})
-@itemx @key{M-g}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-g}, vi-like operation
 @kindex RET, in Info windows
 @kindex M-g, vi-like operation
 @findex select-reference-this-line
@@ -1277,7 +1311,7 @@ own mode line (@pxref{The Mode Line}) and history of nodes viewed in that
 window (@pxref{Node Commands, , @code{history-node}}).
 
 @table @asis
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{o}} (@code{next-window})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{o}} (@code{next-window})
 @cindex windows, selecting
 @kindex C-x o
 @findex next-window
@@ -1294,7 +1328,7 @@ the previous window on the screen.
 Select the previous window on the screen.  This is identical to
 @samp{C-x o} with a negative argument.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{2}} (@code{split-window})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{2}} (@code{split-window})
 @cindex windows, creating
 @kindex C-x 2
 @findex split-window
@@ -1304,7 +1338,7 @@ remains in the original window.  The variable @code{automatic-tiling}
 can cause all of the windows on the screen to be resized for you
 automatically (@pxref{Variables, , automatic-tiling}).
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{0}} (@code{delete-window})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{0}} (@code{delete-window})
 @cindex windows, deleting
 @kindex C-x 0
 @findex delete-window
@@ -1312,26 +1346,26 @@ Delete the current window from the screen.  If you have made too many
 windows and your screen appears cluttered, this is the way to get rid of
 some of them.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{1}} (@code{keep-one-window})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{1}} (@code{keep-one-window})
 @kindex C-x 1
 @findex keep-one-window
 Delete all of the windows excepting the current one.
 
-@item @kbd{ESC @key{C-v}} (@code{scroll-other-window})
+@item @kbd{ESC @kbd{C-v}} (@code{scroll-other-window})
 @kindex ESC C-v, in Info windows
 @findex scroll-other-window
 Scroll the other window, in the same fashion that @samp{C-v} might
 scroll the current window.  Given a negative argument, scroll the
 ``other'' window backward.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{^}} (@code{grow-window})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{^}} (@code{grow-window})
 @kindex C-x ^
 @findex grow-window
 Grow (or shrink) the current window.  Given a numeric argument, grow
 the current window that many lines; with a negative numeric argument,
 shrink the window instead.
 
-@item @kbd{C-x @key{t}} (@code{tile-windows})
+@item @kbd{C-x @kbd{t}} (@code{tile-windows})
 @cindex tiling
 @kindex C-x t
 @findex tile-windows
@@ -1356,41 +1390,41 @@ table briefly lists the commands that are available while input is being
 read in the echo area:
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{C-f} (@code{echo-area-forward})
+@item @kbd{C-f} (@code{echo-area-forward})
 @itemx @key{RIGHT} (an arrow key)
-@itemx @key{M-h}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-h}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-f, in the echo area
 @kindex RIGHT, in the echo area
 @kindex M-h, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-forward
 Move forward a character.
 
-@item @key{C-b} (@code{echo-area-backward})
+@item @kbd{C-b} (@code{echo-area-backward})
 @itemx @key{LEFT} (an arrow key)
-@itemx @key{M-l}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-l}, vi-like operation
 @kindex LEFT, in the echo area
 @kindex C-b, in the echo area
 @kindex M-l, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-backward
 Move backward a character.
 
-@item @key{C-a} (@code{echo-area-beg-of-line})
-@itemx @key{M-0}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-a} (@code{echo-area-beg-of-line})
+@itemx @kbd{M-0}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-a, in the echo area
 @kindex M-0, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-beg-of-line
 Move to the start of the input line.
 
-@item @key{C-e} (@code{echo-area-end-of-line})
-@itemx @key{M-$}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-e} (@code{echo-area-end-of-line})
+@itemx @kbd{M-$}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-e, in the echo area
 @kindex M-$, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-end-of-line
 Move to the end of the input line.
 
-@item @key{M-f} (@code{echo-area-forward-word})
-@itemx @key{C-@key{RIGHT}} (DOS/Windows only)
-@itemx @key{M-w}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{M-f} (@code{echo-area-forward-word})
+@itemx @kbd{C-@key{RIGHT}} (DOS/Windows only)
+@itemx @kbd{M-w}, vi-like operation
 @kindex M-f, in the echo area
 @kindex M-w, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-forward-word
@@ -1399,8 +1433,8 @@ Move forward a word.
 @kindex C-RIGHT, in the echo area
 On DOS/Windows, @kbd{C-@key{RIGHT}} moves forward by words.
 
-@item @key{M-b} (@code{echo-area-backward-word})
-@itemx @key{C-@key{LEFT}} (DOS/Windows only)
+@item @kbd{M-b} (@code{echo-area-backward-word})
+@itemx @kbd{C-@key{LEFT}} (DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex M-b, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-backward-word
 Move backward a word.
@@ -1408,8 +1442,8 @@ Move backward a word.
 @kindex C-LEFT, in the echo area
 On DOS/Windows, @kbd{C-@key{LEFT}} moves backward by words.
 
-@item @key{C-d} (@code{echo-area-delete})
-@itemx @key{M-x}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-d} (@code{echo-area-delete})
+@itemx @kbd{M-x}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-d, in the echo area
 @kindex M-x, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-delete
@@ -1421,11 +1455,11 @@ Delete the character under the cursor.
 Delete the character behind the cursor.
 
 On some keyboards, this key is designated @key{BS}, for
-@samp{BackSpace}.  Those keyboards will usually bind @key{DEL} in the
+@samp{Backspace}.  Those keyboards will usually bind @key{DEL} in the
 echo area to @code{echo-area-delete}.
 
-@item @key{C-g} (@code{echo-area-abort})
-@itemx @key{C-u}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-g} (@code{echo-area-abort})
+@itemx @kbd{C-u}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-g, in the echo area
 @kindex C-u, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-abort
@@ -1438,8 +1472,8 @@ completion.  If the input line is empty, it aborts the calling function.
 @findex echo-area-newline
 Accept (or forces completion of) the current input line.
 
-@item @key{C-q} (@code{echo-area-quoted-insert})
-@itemx @key{C-v}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-q} (@code{echo-area-quoted-insert})
+@itemx @kbd{C-v}, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-q, in the echo area
 @kindex C-v, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-quoted-insert
@@ -1454,8 +1488,8 @@ Insert the character.  Characters that have their 8th bit set, and not
 bound to @samp{M-} commands, are also inserted verbatim; this is useful
 for terminals which support Latin scripts.
 
-@item @key{M-TAB} (@code{echo-area-tab-insert})
-@itemx @key{Shift-@key{TAB}} (on DOS/Windows only)
+@item @kbd{M-TAB} (@code{echo-area-tab-insert})
+@itemx @kbd{Shift-@key{TAB}} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @kindex M-TAB, in the echo area
 @kindex Shift-TAB, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-tab-insert
@@ -1466,7 +1500,7 @@ Insert a TAB character.
 On DOS/Windows only, the @kbd{Shift-@key{TAB}} key is an alias for
 @kbd{M-@key{TAB}}.  This key is sometimes called @samp{BackTab}.
 
-@item @key{C-t} (@code{echo-area-transpose-chars})
+@item @kbd{C-t} (@code{echo-area-transpose-chars})
 @kindex C-t, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-transpose-chars
 Transpose the characters at the cursor.
@@ -1480,25 +1514,25 @@ yanking, see @ref{Killing, , Killing and Deleting, emacs, the GNU Emacs
 Manual}.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{M-d} (@code{echo-area-kill-word})
-@itemx @key{M-X}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{M-d} (@code{echo-area-kill-word})
+@itemx @kbd{M-X}, vi-like operation
 @kindex M-d, in the echo area
 @kindex M-X, in the echo area, vi-like operation
 @findex echo-area-kill-word
 Kill the word following the cursor.
 
-@item @key{M-DEL} (@code{echo-area-backward-kill-word})
-@itemx @key{M-@key{BS}}
+@item @kbd{M-@key{DEL}} (@code{echo-area-backward-kill-word})
+@itemx @kbd{M-@key{BS}}
 @kindex M-DEL, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-backward-kill-word
 Kill the word preceding the cursor.
 
 @kindex M-BS, in the echo area
-On some keyboards, the @code{Backspace} key is used instead of
+On some keyboards, the @samp{Backspace} key is used instead of
 @code{DEL}, so @code{M-@key{Backspace}} has the same effect as
 @code{M-@key{DEL}}.
 
-@item @key{C-k} (@code{echo-area-kill-line})
+@item @kbd{C-k} (@code{echo-area-kill-line})
 @kindex C-k, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-kill-line
 Kill the text from the cursor to the end of the line.
@@ -1508,12 +1542,12 @@ Kill the text from the cursor to the end of the line.
 @findex echo-area-backward-kill-line
 Kill the text from the cursor to the beginning of the line.
 
-@item @key{C-y} (@code{echo-area-yank})
+@item @kbd{C-y} (@code{echo-area-yank})
 @kindex C-y, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-yank
 Yank back the contents of the last kill.
 
-@item @key{M-y} (@code{echo-area-yank-pop})
+@item @kbd{M-y} (@code{echo-area-yank-pop})
 @kindex M-y, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-yank-pop
 Yank back a previous kill, removing the last yanked text first.
@@ -1539,7 +1573,7 @@ The following commands are available when completing in the echo area:
 @findex echo-area-complete
 Insert as much of a completion as is possible.
 
-@item @key{?} (@code{echo-area-possible-completions})
+@item @kbd{?} (@code{echo-area-possible-completions})
 @kindex ?, in the echo area
 @findex echo-area-possible-completions
 Display a window containing a list of the possible completions of what
@@ -1641,8 +1675,8 @@ description of what the variable affects.
 Read the name of an Info command in the echo area, and then display
 a key sequence which can be typed in order to invoke that command.
 
-@item @key{C-h} (@code{get-help-window})
-@itemx @key{?}
+@item @kbd{C-h} (@code{get-help-window})
+@itemx @kbd{?}
 @itemx @key{F1} (on DOS/Windows only)
 @itemx h, vi-like operation
 @kindex C-h
@@ -1654,8 +1688,8 @@ Create (or Move into) the window displaying @code{*Help*}, and place
 a node containing a quick reference card into it.  This window displays
 the most concise information about GNU Info available.
 
-@item @key{h} (@code{get-info-help-node})
-@itemx @key{M-h}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{h} (@code{get-info-help-node})
+@itemx @kbd{M-h}, vi-like operation
 @kindex h
 @kindex M-h, vi-like operation
 @findex get-info-help-node
@@ -1668,7 +1702,7 @@ placed into the location of your Info directory.
 Here are the commands for creating a numeric argument:
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{C-u} (@code{universal-argument})
+@item @kbd{C-u} (@code{universal-argument})
 @cindex numeric arguments
 @kindex C-u
 @findex universal-argument
@@ -1679,12 +1713,12 @@ scrolling commands; @samp{C-u C-v} scrolls the screen 4 lines, while
 by digit keys sets the numeric argument to the number thus typed:
 @kbd{C-u 1 2 0} sets the argument to 120.
 
-@item @key{M-1} (@code{add-digit-to-numeric-arg})
-@itemx @key{1}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{M-2} @dots{} @key{M-9}
-@itemx @key{2} @dots{} @key{9}, vi-like operation
-@itemx @key{M-0}
-@itemx @key{0}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{M-1} (@code{add-digit-to-numeric-arg})
+@itemx @kbd{1}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-2} @dots{} @kbd{M-9}
+@itemx @kbd{2} @dots{} @kbd{9}, vi-like operation
+@itemx @kbd{M-0}
+@itemx @kbd{0}, vi-like operation
 @kindex M-0 @dots{} M-9
 @kindex 0 @dots{} 9, vi-like operation
 @findex add-digit-to-numeric-arg
@@ -1704,8 +1738,8 @@ or
 @kbd{M-3 2 C-l}
 @end example
 
-@item @key{M--} (@code{add-digit-to-numeric-arg}
-@itemx @key{-}
+@item @kbd{M--} (@code{add-digit-to-numeric-arg}
+@itemx @kbd{-}
 @kindex M--
 @kindex -
 @cindex negative arguments
@@ -1726,8 +1760,8 @@ sequence, to cancel lengthy operations (such as multi-file searches) and
 to cancel reading input in the echo area.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{C-g} (@code{abort-key})
-@itemx @key{C-u}, vi-like operation
+@item @kbd{C-g} (@code{abort-key})
+@itemx @kbd{C-u}, vi-like operation
 @cindex cancelling typeahead
 @cindex cancelling the current operation
 @kindex C-g, in Info windows
@@ -1741,7 +1775,7 @@ The @samp{q} command of Info simply quits running Info.  Under
 or @samp{ZZ}.
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{q} (@code{quit})
+@item @kbd{q} (@code{quit})
 @itemx @kbd{C-x C-c}
 @itemx @kbd{:q}, vi-like operation
 @itemx @kbd{ZZ}, vi-like operation
@@ -1773,7 +1807,7 @@ Finally, Info provides a convenient way to display footnotes which might
 be associated with the current node that you are viewing:
 
 @table @asis
-@item @key{ESC C-f} (@code{show-footnotes})
+@item @kbd{ESC C-f} (@code{show-footnotes})
 @kindex ESC C-f
 @findex show-footnotes
 @cindex footnotes, displaying
@@ -1841,6 +1875,13 @@ window.  There are exceptions to the automatic tiling; specifically, the
 windows @samp{*Completions*} and @samp{*Footnotes*} are @emph{not}
 resized through automatic tiling; they remain their original size.
 
+@anchor{cursor-movement-scrolls}
+@item cursor-movement-scrolls
+Normally, cursor movement commands (@pxref{Cursor Commands}) stop when
+top or bottom of a node is reached.  When this variable is set to
+@code{On}, cursor movement commands act as scrolling ones and their
+behavior is controlled by the @code{scroll-behavior} variable (see below).
+
 @item errors-ring-bell
 @vindex errors-ring-bell
 When set to @code{On}, errors cause the bell to ring.  The default
@@ -1870,12 +1911,15 @@ Info that it is running in an environment where the European standard
 character set is in use, and allows you to input such characters to
 Info, as well as display them.
 
+@anchor{scroll-behavior}
 @item scroll-behavior
+@itemx scroll-behaviour
 @vindex scroll-behavior
+@vindex scroll-behaviour
 Control what happens when forward scrolling is requested at the end of
 a node, or when backward scrolling is requested at the beginning of a
-node.  The default value for this variable is @code{Continuous}.  There
-are three possible values for this variable:
+node.  The default value for this variable is @code{Continuous}.
+There are three possible values for this variable:
 
 @table @code
 @item Continuous
@@ -1885,6 +1929,32 @@ This behavior is identical to using the @samp{]}
 (@code{global-next-node}) and @samp{[} (@code{global-prev-node})
 commands.
 
+@item scroll-last-node
+@vindex scroll-last-node
+Control what happens when a scrolling command is issued at the end of
+the last node. Possible values are:
+
+@table @code
+@item Stop
+Do not scroll. Display the @samp{No more nodes within this document.}
+message. This is the default.
+
+@item Scroll
+Scroll as usual. Since the last node is usually an index, this means
+that the very first node from the menu will be selected.
+
+@item Top
+Go to the top node of this document.
+@end table
+
+This variable is in effect only if @code{scroll-behaviour} is set to
+@code{Continuous}.
+
+Notice that the default behavior has changed in version 4.12. Previous
+versions behaved as if @code{scroll-last-node=Scroll} was set. This
+behavior was counter-intuitive, therefore since version 4.12 the
+default is to stop at the last node.
+
 @item Next Only
 Only try to get the @samp{Next} node.
 
@@ -1894,6 +1964,13 @@ Simply give up, changing nothing.  If @code{scroll-behavior} is
 viewed.
 @end table
 
+This variable normally affects only scrolling commands.
+@xref{cursor-movement-scrolls}, for information on how to widen its
+scope.
+
+The two names, @code{scroll-behavior} and @code{scroll-behaviour}, are
+a historical accident.  They are merely synonyms.
+
 @item scroll-step
 @vindex scroll-step
 The number of lines to scroll when the cursor moves out of the window.
@@ -1942,10 +2019,10 @@ effect.  However, you can make Info perform quietly by setting the
 @cindex .infokey
 @cindex _info file (MS-DOS)
 
-For those whose editor/pager of choice is not Emacs and who are not
-entirely satisfied with the --vi-keys option (@pxref{--vi-keys}), GNU
-Info provides a way to define different key-to-command bindings and
-variable settings from the defaults described in this document.
+GNU Info provides a way to define arbitrary key-to-command bindings
+and variable settings, overriding the defaults described in this
+document.  (The @option{--vi-keys} option rebinds many keys at once;
+@pxref{--vi-keys}.)
 
 On startup, GNU Info looks for a configuration file in the invoker's
 HOME directory called @file{.info}@footnote{Due to the limitations of
@@ -2185,16 +2262,6 @@ Some common ways to organize Info files.
 @end ignore
 
 
-@node Copying This Manual
-@appendix Copying This Manual
-
-@menu
-* GNU Free Documentation License::  License for copying this manual.
-@end menu
-
-@include fdl.texi
-
-
 @node Index
 @appendix Index
 
index 39ca1d3..352f09a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.34.
-.TH INFO "1" "December 2004" "info 4.8" "User Commands"
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH INFO "1" "September 2008" "info 4.13" "User Commands"
 .SH NAME
 info \- read Info documents
 .SH SYNOPSIS
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ info \- read Info documents
 Read documentation in Info format.
 .SH OPTIONS
 .TP
-\fB\-\-apropos\fR=\fISTRING\fR
+\fB\-k\fR, \fB\-\-apropos\fR=\fISTRING\fR
 look up STRING in all indices of all manuals.
 .TP
 \fB\-d\fR, \fB\-\-directory\fR=\fIDIR\fR
@@ -48,25 +48,33 @@ go to command\-line options node.
 \fB\-\-subnodes\fR
 recursively output menu items.
 .TP
-\fB\-w\fR, \fB\-\-where\fR, \fB\-\-location\fR
-print physical location of Info file.
-.TP
 \fB\-\-vi\-keys\fR
 use vi\-like and less\-like key bindings.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-version\fR
 display version information and exit.
+.TP
+\fB\-w\fR, \fB\-\-where\fR, \fB\-\-location\fR
+print physical location of Info file.
 .PP
 The first non\-option argument, if present, is the menu entry to start from;
 it is searched for in all `dir' files along INFOPATH.
 If it is not present, info merges all `dir' files and shows the result.
 Any remaining arguments are treated as the names of menu
 items relative to the initial node visited.
+.PP
+For a summary of key bindings, type h within Info.
 .SH EXAMPLES
 .TP
 info
 show top\-level dir menu
 .TP
+info info
+show the general manual for Info readers
+.TP
+info info\-stnd
+show the manual specific to this Info program
+.TP
 info emacs
 start at emacs node from top\-level dir
 .TP
@@ -76,6 +84,9 @@ start at buffers node within emacs manual
 info \fB\-\-show\-options\fR emacs
 start at node with emacs' command line options
 .TP
+info \fB\-\-subnodes\fR \fB\-o\fR out.txt emacs
+dump entire manual to out.txt
+.TP
 info \fB\-f\fR ./foo.info
 show file ./foo.info, not searching dir
 .SH "REPORTING BUGS"
@@ -83,7 +94,8 @@ Email bug reports to bug\-texinfo@gnu.org,
 general questions and discussion to help\-texinfo@gnu.org.
 Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
 .SH COPYRIGHT
-Copyright \(co 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-There is NO warranty.  You may redistribute this software
-under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
-For more information about these matters, see the files named COPYING.
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
index af9ba2e..488d2a1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 .\" info(5)
-.\" $Id: info.5,v 1.2 2004/04/11 17:56:45 karl Exp $
+.\" $Id: info.5,v 1.3 2005/01/20 22:38:32 karl Exp $
 .\"
 .\" Copyright (C) 1998 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 .\"
 .\" versions, except that this permission notice may be stated in a
 .\" translation approved by the Foundation.
 .\"
+.de EX
+.nf
+.ft CW
+.in +5
+..
+.de EE
+.in -5
+.ft R
+.fi
+..
 .TH INFO 5 "GNU Info" "FSF"
 .SH NAME
 info \- readable online documentation
@@ -37,13 +47,13 @@ but can be created from scratch if so desired.
 For a full description of the Texinfo language and associated tools,
 please see the Texinfo manual (written in Texinfo itself).  Most likely,
 running this command from your shell:
-.RS
-.I info texinfo
-.RE
+.EX
+info texinfo
+.EE
 or this key sequence from inside Emacs:
-.RS
-.I M-x info RET m texinfo RET
-.RE
+.EX
+M-x info RET m texinfo RET
+.EE
 will get you there.
 .SH AVAILABILITY
 ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/texinfo-<version>.tar.gz
index 014e916..62c4c85 100644 (file)
 This file describes how to use Info, the on-line, menu-driven GNU
 documentation system.
 
-Copyright (C) 1989, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
-Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+Copyright @copyright{} 1989, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001,
+2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 @quotation
 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
-under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or
+under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or
 any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no
 Invariant Sections, with the Front-Cover texts being ``A GNU
-Manual'', and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
+Manual,'' and with the Back-Cover Texts as in (a) below.  A copy of the
 license is included in the section entitled ``GNU Free Documentation
 License'' in the Emacs manual.
 
-(a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: ``You have freedom to copy and modify
-this GNU Manual, like GNU software.  Copies published by the Free
-Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
+(a) The FSF's Back-Cover Text is: ``You have freedom to copy and
+modify this GNU Manual, like GNU software.  Buying copies from GNU
+Press supports the FSF in developing GNU and promoting software
+freedom.''
 
 This document is part of a collection distributed under the GNU Free
 Documentation License.  If you want to distribute this document
@@ -63,37 +64,38 @@ The GNU Project distributes most of its on-line manuals in the
 probably using an Info reader to read this now.
 
 There are two primary Info readers: @code{info}, a stand-alone program
-designed just to read Info files, and the @code{info} package in GNU
-Emacs, a general-purpose editor.  At present, only the Emacs reader
-supports using a mouse.
+designed just to read Info files (@pxref{Top,,Stand-alone Info,
+info-stnd, GNU Info}), and the @code{info} package in GNU Emacs, a
+general-purpose editor.  At present, only the Emacs reader supports
+using a mouse.
 
 @ifinfo
 If you are new to the Info reader and want to learn how to use it,
 type the command @kbd{h} now.  It brings you to a programmed
 instruction sequence.
 
-To read about expert-level Info commands, type @kbd{n} twice.  This
-brings you to @cite{Info for Experts}, skipping over the `Getting
+To read about advanced Info commands, type @kbd{n} twice.  This
+brings you to @cite{Advanced Info Commands}, skipping over the `Getting
 Started' chapter.
 @end ifinfo
 @end ifnottex
 
 @menu
 * Getting Started::             Getting started using an Info reader.
+* Advanced::                    Advanced Info commands.
 * Expert Info::                 Info commands for experts.
-* Creating an Info File::       How to make your own Info file.
 * Index::                       An index of topics, commands, and variables.
 @end menu
 
-@node Getting Started, Expert Info, Top, Top
+@node Getting Started, Advanced, Top, Top
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
 @chapter Getting Started
 
 This first part of this Info manual describes how to get around inside
 of Info.  The second part of the manual describes various advanced
-Info commands, and how to write an Info as distinct from a Texinfo
-file.  The third part briefly explains how to generate Info files from
-Texinfo files.
+Info commands.  The third part briefly explains how to generate Info
+files from Texinfo files, and describes how to write an Info file
+by hand.
 
 @ifnotinfo
 This manual is primarily designed for browsing with an Info reader
@@ -153,13 +155,15 @@ number of lines; most readers pass by it without seeing it.)
 Since your terminal has a relatively small number of lines on its
 screen, it is necessary to give you special advice at the beginning.
 
-If you see the text @samp{--All----} near the bottom right corner
-of the screen, it means the entire text you are looking at fits on the
-screen.  If you see @samp{--Top----} instead, it means that there is
-more text below that does not fit.  To move forward through the text
-and see another screen full, press @key{SPC}, the Space bar.  To move
-back up, press the key labeled @samp{Backspace} or @samp{DEL} (on some
-keyboards, this key might be labeled @samp{Delete}).
+If the entire text you are looking at fits on the screen, the text
+@samp{All} will be displayed at the bottom of the screen.  In the
+stand-alone Info reader, it is displayed at the bottom right corner of
+the screen; in Emacs, it is displayed on the modeline.  If you see the
+text @samp{Top} instead, it means that there is more text below that
+does not fit.  To move forward through the text and see another screen
+full, press @key{SPC}, the Space bar.  To move back up, press the key
+labeled @samp{Backspace} or @samp{DEL} (on some keyboards, this key
+might be labeled @samp{Delete}).
 
 @ifinfo
 Here are 40 lines of junk, so you can try @key{SPC} and @key{DEL} and
@@ -238,10 +242,10 @@ line says that this is node @samp{Help} in the file @file{info}.
 (look at it now) says that the @samp{Next} node after this one is the
 node called @samp{Help-P}.  An advanced Info command lets you go to
 any node whose name you know.  In the stand-alone Info reader program,
-the header line shows the names of this node and the info file as
-well.  In Emacs, the header line is duplicated in a special typeface,
-and the duplicate remains at the top of the window all the time even
-if you scroll through the node.
+the header line shows the names of this node and the Info file as
+well.  In Emacs, the header line is displayed with a special typeface,
+and remains at the top of the window all the time even if you scroll
+through the node.
 
   Besides a @samp{Next}, a node can have a @samp{Previous} link, or an
 @samp{Up} link, or both.  As you can see, this node has all of these
@@ -260,7 +264,7 @@ links.
 
 @format
 >> If you are in Emacs and have a mouse, and if you already practiced
-   typing @kbd{n} to get to the next node, click now with the middle
+   typing @kbd{n} to get to the next node, click now with the left 
    mouse button on the @samp{Next} link to do the same ``the mouse way''.
 @end format
 
@@ -276,15 +280,14 @@ node, @samp{Help-^L}.
 
 @format
 >> But do not type @kbd{n} yet.  First, try the @kbd{p} command, or
-   (in Emacs) click the middle mouse button on the @samp{Prev} link.
-   That takes you to the @samp{Previous} node.  Then use @kbd{n} to
-   return here.
+   (in Emacs) click on the @samp{Prev} link.  That takes you to
+   the @samp{Previous} node.  Then use @kbd{n} to return here.
 @end format
 
   If you read this in Emacs, you will see an @samp{Info} item in the
 menu bar, close to its right edge.  Clicking the mouse on the
 @samp{Info} menu-bar item opens a menu of commands which include
-@samp{Next} and @samp{Prev} (and also some others which you didn't yet
+@samp{Next} and @samp{Previous} (and also some others which you didn't yet
 learn about).
 
   This all probably seems insultingly simple so far, but @emph{please
@@ -309,8 +312,8 @@ underlined as well; it says what the node is about.
 
   This is a big node and it does not all fit on your display screen.
 You can tell that there is more that is not visible because you
-can see the string @samp{--Top-----} rather than @samp{--All----} near
-the bottom right corner of the screen.
+can see the text @samp{Top} rather than @samp{All} near the bottom of
+the screen.
 
 @kindex SPC @r{(Info mode)}
 @kindex DEL @r{(Info mode)}
@@ -394,17 +397,13 @@ the @key{BACKSPACE} key (or @key{DEL}) many times.  You can also type
    Then come back, by typing @key{SPC} one or more times.
 @end format
 
-  If your screen is very tall, all of this node might fit at once.  In
-that case, @kbd{b} won't do anything.  But you could observe the
-effect of the @kbd{b} key if you use a smaller window.
-
 @kindex ? @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-summary
   You have just learned a considerable number of commands.  If you
 want to use one but have trouble remembering which, you should type
-a @kbd{?} (in Emacs it runs the @code{Info-summary} command) which
-displays a brief list of commands.  When you are finished looking at
-the list, make it go away by typing a @key{SPC} repeatedly.
+@kbd{?}, which displays a brief list of commands.  When you are
+finished looking at the list, make it go away by typing @key{SPC}
+repeatedly.
 
 @format
 >> Type a @key{?} now.  Press @key{SPC} to see consecutive screenfuls of
@@ -597,7 +596,7 @@ line becomes blank again.  Then you can type Info commands again.
   The command to go to a subnode via a menu is @kbd{m}.  After you type
 the @kbd{m}, the line at the bottom of the screen says @samp{Menu item: }.
 You must then type the name of the subtopic you want, and end it with
-a @key{RET}.  In Emacs, @kbd{m} runs the command @code{Info-menu}.
+a @key{RET}.
 
 @cindex abbreviating Info subnodes
   You can abbreviate the subtopic name.  If the abbreviation is not
@@ -671,10 +670,12 @@ mistake.
 
   Another way to move to the menu subtopic lines and between them is
 to type @key{TAB}.  Each time you type a @key{TAB}, you move to the
-next subtopic line.  To move to a previous subtopic line, type
-@kbd{M-@key{TAB}}---that is, press and hold the @key{META} key and then
-press @key{TAB}.  (On some keyboards, the @key{META} key might be labeled
-@samp{Alt}.)
+next subtopic line.  To move to a previous subtopic line in the
+stand-alone reader, type @kbd{M-@key{TAB}}---that is, press and hold
+the @key{META} key and then press @key{TAB}.  (On some keyboards, the
+@key{META} key might be labeled @samp{Alt}.)  In Emacs Info, type
+@kbd{S-@key{TAB}} to move to a previous subtopic line (press and hold
+the @key{Shift} key and then press @key{TAB}).
 
   Once you move cursor to a subtopic line, press @key{RET} to go to
 that subtopic's node.
@@ -688,7 +689,7 @@ ends the subtopic's brief name.  You will see the subtopic's name
 change its appearance (usually, its background color will change), and
 the shape of the mouse pointer will change if your platform supports
 that.  After a while, if you leave the mouse on that spot, a small
-window will pop up, saying ``Mouse-2: go to that node'', or the same
+window will pop up, saying ``Mouse-2: go to that node,'' or the same
 message may appear at the bottom of the screen.
 
   @kbd{Mouse-2} is the second button of your mouse counting from the
@@ -723,11 +724,10 @@ usually used to ``stay on the same level but go backwards''.
 @kindex u @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-up
   You can go back to the node @samp{Help-M} by typing the command
-@kbd{u} for ``Up'' (the Emacs command run by @kbd{u} is
-@code{Info-up}).  That puts you at the @emph{front} of the node---to
-get back to where you were reading you have to type some @key{SPC}s.
-(Some Info readers, such as the one built into Emacs, put you at the
-same place where you were reading in @samp{Help-M}.)
+@kbd{u} for ``Up''.  This puts you at the menu subtopic line pointing
+to the subnode that the @kbd{u} command brought you from.  (Some Info
+readers may put you at the @emph{front} of the node instead---to get
+back to where you were reading, you have to type some @key{SPC}s.)
 
   Another way to go Up is to click @kbd{Mouse-2} on the @samp{Up}
 pointer shown in the header line (provided that you have a mouse).
@@ -749,19 +749,21 @@ in Emacs.  Do @kbd{M-x visible-mode} to show or hide it.)
 
 @kindex f @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-follow-reference
-  There are two ways to follow a cross reference.  You can move the
-cursor to it and press @key{RET}, just as in a menu.  @key{RET}
-follows the cross reference that the cursor is on.  Or you can type
-@kbd{f} and then specify the name of the cross reference (in this
-case, @samp{Cross}) as an argument.  In Emacs Info, @kbd{f} runs
-@code{Info-follow-reference},
-
-  In the @kbd{f} command, you select the cross reference with its
-name, so it does not matter where the cursor was.  If the cursor is on
-or near a cross reference, @kbd{f} suggests that reference name in
-parentheses as the default; typing @key{RET} will follow that
-reference.  However, if you type a different reference name, @kbd{f}
-will follow the other reference which has that name.
+  You can follow a cross reference by moving the cursor to it and
+press @key{RET}, just as in a menu.  In Emacs, you can also click
+@kbd{Mouse-1} on a cross reference to follow it; you can see that the
+cross reference is mouse-sensitive by moving the mouse pointer to the
+reference and watching how the underlying text and the mouse pointer
+change in response.
+
+  Another way to follow a cross reference is to type @kbd{f} and then
+specify the name of the cross reference (in this case, @samp{Cross})
+as an argument.  For this command, it does not matter where the cursor
+was.  If the cursor is on or near a cross reference, @kbd{f} suggests
+that reference name in parentheses as the default; typing @key{RET}
+will follow that reference.  However, if you type a different
+reference name, @kbd{f} will follow the other reference which has that
+name.
 
 @format
 >> Type @kbd{f}, followed by @kbd{Cross}, and then @key{RET}.
@@ -785,8 +787,9 @@ to cancel the @kbd{f}.
    type a @kbd{Control-g} and see how the @samp{f} gives up.
 @end format
 
-  The @key{TAB} and @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} key, which move between menu
-items in a menu, also move between cross references outside of menus.
+  The @key{TAB}, @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} and @kbd{S-@key{TAB}} keys,
+which move between menu items in a menu, also move between cross
+references outside of menus.
 
   Sometimes a cross reference (or a node) can lead to another file (in
 other words another ``manual''), or, on occasion, even a file on a
@@ -795,36 +798,22 @@ stand-alone Info avoid using remote links).  Such a cross reference
 looks like this: @xref{Top,, Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo:
 The GNU Documentation Format}.  (After following this link, type
 @kbd{l} to get back to this node.)  Here the name @samp{texinfo}
-between parentheses (shown in the stand-alone version) refers to the
-file name.  This file name appears in cross references and node names
-if it differs from the current file.  In Emacs, the file name is
-hidden (along with other text).  (Use @kbd{M-x visible-mode} to show
-or hide it.)
-
-  The remainder of this node applies only to the Emacs version.  If
-you use the stand-alone version, you can type @kbd{n} immediately.
-
-  To some users, switching manuals is a much bigger switch than
-switching sections.  These users like to know that they are going to
-be switching to another manual (and which one) before actually doing
-so, especially given that, if one does not notice, Info commands like
-@kbd{t} (see the next node) can have confusing results.
-
-  If you put your mouse over the cross reference and if the cross
-reference leads to a different manual, then the information appearing
-in a separate box (tool tip) or in the echo area, will mention the
-file the cross reference will carry you to (between parentheses).
-This is also true for menu subtopic names.  If you have a mouse, just
-leave it over the @samp{Overview} cross reference above and watch what
-happens.
-
-  If you always like to have that information available without having
-to move your mouse over the cross reference, set
-@code{Info-hide-note-references} to a value other than t (@pxref{Emacs
-Info Variables}).  You might also want to do that if you have a lot of
-cross references to files on remote machines and have non-permanent or
-slow access, since otherwise you might not be able to distinguish
-between local and remote links.
+between parentheses refers to the file name.  This file name appears
+in cross references and node names if it differs from the current
+file, so you can always know that you are going to be switching to
+another manual and which one.
+
+However, Emacs normally hides some other text in cross-references.
+If you put your mouse over the cross reference, then the information
+appearing in a separate box (tool tip) or in the echo area will show
+the full cross-reference including the file name and the node name of
+the cross reference.  If you have a mouse, just leave it over the
+cross reference @xref{Top,, Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo:
+The GNU Documentation Format}, and watch what happens.  If you
+always like to have that information visible without having to move
+your mouse over the cross reference, use @kbd{M-x visible-mode}, or
+set @code{Info-hide-note-references} to a value other than @code{t}
+(@pxref{Emacs Info Variables}).
 
 @format
 >> Now type @kbd{n} to learn more commands.
@@ -845,17 +834,18 @@ This allows Info readers to go to the exact line of an entry, not just
 the start of the containing node.)
 
   You can get to the index from the main menu of the file with the
-@kbd{m} command; then you can use the @kbd{m} command again in the
-index node to go to the node that describes the topic you want.
+@kbd{m} command and the name of the index node; then you can use the
+@kbd{m} command again in the index node to go to the node that
+describes the topic you want.
 
   There is also a short-cut Info command, @kbd{i}, which does all of
 that for you.  It searches the index for a given topic (a string) and
 goes to the node which is listed in the index for that topic.
-@xref{Info Search}, for a full explanation.
+@xref{Search Index}, for a full explanation.
 
 @kindex l @r{(Info mode)}
-@findex Info-last
-@cindex going back in Info mode
+@findex Info-history-back
+@cindex going back in Info history
   If you have been moving around to different nodes and wish to
 retrace your steps, the @kbd{l} command (@kbd{l} for @dfn{last}) will
 do that, one node-step at a time.  As you move from node to node, Info
@@ -863,8 +853,6 @@ records the nodes where you have been in a special history list.  The
 @kbd{l} command revisits nodes in the history list; each successive
 @kbd{l} command moves one step back through the history.
 
-  In Emacs, @kbd{l} runs the command @code{Info-last}.
-
 @format
 >> Try typing @kbd{p p n} and then three @kbd{l}'s, pausing in between
 to see what each @kbd{l} does.  You should wind up right back here.
@@ -875,6 +863,20 @@ where @emph{you} last were, whereas @kbd{p} always moves to the node
 which the header says is the @samp{Previous} node (from this node, the
 @samp{Prev} link leads to @samp{Help-Xref}).
 
+@kindex r @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex Info-history-forward
+@cindex going forward in Info history
+  You can use the @kbd{r} command (@code{Info-history-forward} in Emacs)
+to revisit nodes in the history list in the forward direction, so that
+@kbd{r} will return you to the node you came from by typing @kbd{l}.
+
+@kindex L @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex Info-history
+@cindex history list of visited nodes
+  The @kbd{L} command (@code{Info-history} in Emacs) creates a virtual
+node that contains a list of all nodes you visited.  You can select
+a previously visited node from this menu to revisit it.
+
 @kindex d @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-directory
 @cindex go to Directory node
@@ -898,54 +900,172 @@ This is useful if you want to browse the manual's main menu, or select
 some specific top-level menu item.  The Emacs command run by @kbd{t}
 is @code{Info-top-node}.
 
-  Clicking @kbd{Mouse-2} on or near a cross reference also follows the
-reference.  You can see that the cross reference is mouse-sensitive by
-moving the mouse pointer to the reference and watching how the
-underlying text and the mouse pointer change in response.
-
 @format
 >> Now type @kbd{n} to see the last node of the course.
 @end format
 
-  @xref{Expert Info}, for more advanced Info features.
+  @xref{Advanced}, for more advanced Info features.
 
 @c If a menu appears at the end of this node, remove it.
 @c It is an accident of the menu updating command.
 
-@node Expert Info
-@chapter Info for Experts
+@node Help-Q,  , Help-Int, Getting Started
+@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
+@section Quitting Info
+
+@kindex q @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex Info-exit
+@cindex quitting Info mode
+  To get out of Info, back to what you were doing before, type @kbd{q}
+for @dfn{Quit}.  This runs @code{Info-exit} in Emacs.
+
+  This is the end of the basic course on using Info.  You have learned
+how to move in an Info document, and how to follow menus and cross
+references.  This makes you ready for reading manuals top to bottom,
+as new users should do when they learn a new package.
+
+  Another set of Info commands is useful when you need to find
+something quickly in a manual---that is, when you need to use a manual
+as a reference rather than as a tutorial.  We urge you to learn
+these search commands as well.  If you want to do that now, follow this
+cross reference to @ref{Advanced}.
+
+Yet another set of commands are meant for experienced users; you can
+find them by looking in the Directory node for documentation on Info.
+Finding them will be a good exercise in using Info in the usual
+manner.
+
+@format
+>> Type @kbd{d} to go to the Info directory node; then type
+   @kbd{mInfo} and Return, to get to the node about Info and
+   see what other help is available.
+@end format
+
+
+@node Advanced
+@chapter Advanced Info Commands
 
-  This chapter describes various Info commands for experts.  (If you
+  This chapter describes various advanced Info commands.  (If you
 are using a stand-alone Info reader, there are additional commands
 specific to it, which are documented in several chapters of @ref{Top,,
 GNU Info, info-stnd, GNU Info}.)
 
-  This chapter also explains how to write an Info as distinct from a
-Texinfo file.  (However, in most cases, writing a Texinfo file is
-better, since you can use it to make a printed manual or produce other
-formats, such as HTML and DocBook, as well as for generating Info
-files.)  @xref{Top,, Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU
-Documentation Format}.
+@kindex C-q @r{(Info mode)}
+  One advanced command useful with most of the others described here
+is @kbd{C-q}, which ``quotes'' the next character so that it is
+entered literally (@pxref{Inserting Text,,,emacs,The GNU Emacs
+Manual}).  For example, pressing @kbd{?} ordinarily brings up a list
+of completion possibilities.  If you want to (for example) search for
+an actual @samp{?} character, the simplest way is to insert it using
+@kbd{C-q ?}.  This works the same in Emacs and stand-alone Info.
 
 @menu
-* Advanced::             Advanced Info commands: g, e, and 1 - 9.
-* Info Search::          How to search Info documents for specific subjects.
-* Add::                  Describes how to add new nodes to the hierarchy.
-                           Also tells what nodes look like.
-* Menus::                How to add to or create menus in Info nodes.
-* Cross-refs::           How to add cross-references to Info nodes.
-* Tags::                 How to make tags tables for Info files.
-* Checking::             Checking an Info File
+* Search Text::          How to search Info documents.
+* Search Index::         How to search the indices for specific subjects.
+* Go to node::           How to go to a node by name.
+* Choose menu subtopic:: How to choose a menu subtopic by its number.
+* Create Info buffer::   How to create a new Info buffer in Emacs.
 * Emacs Info Variables:: Variables modifying the behavior of Emacs Info.
 @end menu
 
-@node Advanced, Info Search,  , Expert Info
+
+@node Search Text, Search Index,  , Advanced
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
-@section Advanced Info Commands
+@section @kbd{s} searches Info documents
+
+@cindex searching Info documents
+@cindex Info document as a reference
+  The commands which move between and inside nodes allow you to read
+the entire manual or its large portions.  But what if you need to find
+some information in the manual as fast as you can, and you don't know
+or don't remember in what node to look for it?  This need arises when
+you use a manual as a @dfn{reference}, or when it is impractical to
+read the entire manual before you start using the programs it
+describes.
+
+  Info has powerful searching facilities that let you find things
+quickly.  You can search either the manual text or its indices.
+
+@kindex s @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex Info-search
+  The @kbd{s} command allows you to search a whole Info file for a string.
+It switches to the next node if and when that is necessary.  You
+type @kbd{s} followed by the string to search for, terminated by
+@key{RET}.  To search for the same string again, just @kbd{s} followed
+by @key{RET} will do.  The file's nodes are scanned in the order
+they are in the file, which has no necessary relationship to the
+order that they may be in the tree structure of menus and @samp{next}
+pointers.  But normally the two orders are not very different.  In any
+case, you can always look at the mode line to find out what node you have
+reached, if the header is not visible (this can happen, because @kbd{s}
+puts your cursor at the occurrence of the string, not at the beginning
+of the node).
+
+@kindex M-s @r{(Info mode)}
+  In Emacs, @kbd{Meta-s} is equivalent to @kbd{s}.  That is for
+compatibility with other GNU packages that use @kbd{M-s} for a similar
+kind of search command.  Both @kbd{s} and @kbd{M-s} run in Emacs the
+command @code{Info-search}.
+
+@kindex C-s @r{(Info mode)}
+@kindex C-r @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex isearch
+  Instead of using @kbd{s} in Emacs Info and in the stand-alone Info,
+you can use an incremental search started with @kbd{C-s} or @kbd{C-r}.
+It can search through multiple Info nodes.  @xref{Incremental Search,,,
+emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.  In Emacs, you can disable this behavior
+by setting the variable @code{Info-isearch-search} to @code{nil}
+(@pxref{Emacs Info Variables}).
+
+@node Search Index, Go to node, Search Text, Advanced
+@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
+@section @kbd{i} searches the indices for specific subjects
+
+@cindex searching Info indices
+@kindex i @r{(Info mode)}
+@findex Info-index
+  Since most topics in the manual should be indexed, you should try
+the index search first before the text search.  The @kbd{i} command
+prompts you for a subject and then looks up that subject in the
+indices.  If it finds an index entry with the subject you typed, it
+goes to the node to which that index entry points.  You should browse
+through that node to see whether the issue you are looking for is
+described there.  If it isn't, type @kbd{,} one or more times to go
+through additional index entries which match your subject.
+
+  The @kbd{i} command and subsequent @kbd{,} commands find all index
+entries which include the string you typed @emph{as a substring}.
+For each match, Info shows in the echo area the full index entry it
+found.  Often, the text of the full index entry already gives you
+enough information to decide whether it is relevant to what you are
+looking for, so we recommend that you read what Info shows in the echo
+area before looking at the node it displays.
+
+  Since @kbd{i} looks for a substring, you can search for subjects even
+if you are not sure how they are spelled in the index.  For example,
+suppose you want to find something that is pertinent to commands which
+complete partial input (e.g., when you type @key{TAB}).  If you want
+to catch index entries that refer to ``complete,'' ``completion,'' and
+``completing,'' you could type @kbd{icomplet@key{RET}}.
 
-Here are some more Info commands that make it easier to move around.
+  Info documents which describe programs should index the commands,
+options, and key sequences that the program provides.  If you are
+looking for a description of a command, an option, or a key, just type
+their names when @kbd{i} prompts you for a topic.  For example, if you
+want to read the description of what the @kbd{C-l} key does, type
+@kbd{iC-l@key{RET}} literally.
 
-@subheading @kbd{g} goes to a node by name
+@findex info-apropos
+@findex index-apropos
+If you aren't sure which manual documents the topic you are looking
+for, try the @kbd{M-x info-apropos} command in Emacs, or the @kbd{M-x
+index-apropos} command in the stand-alone reader.  It prompts for
+a string and then looks up that string in all the indices of all the
+Info documents installed on your system.
+
+@node Go to node, Choose menu subtopic, Search Index, Advanced
+@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
+@section @kbd{g} goes to a node by name
 
 @kindex g @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-goto-node
@@ -953,8 +1073,7 @@ Here are some more Info commands that make it easier to move around.
   If you know a node's name, you can go there by typing @kbd{g}, the
 name, and @key{RET}.  Thus, @kbd{gTop@key{RET}} would go to the node
 called @samp{Top} in this file.  (This is equivalent to @kbd{t}, see
-@ref{Help-Int}.)  @kbd{gAdvanced@key{RET}} would come back here.
-@kbd{g} in Emacs runs the command @code{Info-goto-node}.
+@ref{Help-Int}.)  @kbd{gGo to node@key{RET}} would come back here.
 
   Unlike @kbd{m}, @kbd{g} does not allow the use of abbreviations.
 But it does allow completion, so you can type @key{TAB} to complete a
@@ -969,9 +1088,11 @@ the node @samp{Top} in the Info file @file{dir}.  Likewise,
 
   The node name @samp{*} specifies the whole file.  So you can look at
 all of the current file by typing @kbd{g*@key{RET}} or all of any
-other file with @kbd{g(@var{filename})@key{RET}}.
+other file with @kbd{g(@var{filename})*@key{RET}}.
 
-@subheading @kbd{1}--@kbd{9} choose a menu subtopic by its number
+@node Choose menu subtopic, Create Info buffer, Go to node, Advanced
+@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
+@section @kbd{1}--@kbd{9} choose a menu subtopic by its number
 
 @kindex 1 @r{through} 9 @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex Info-nth-menu-item
@@ -982,8 +1103,7 @@ you might like to use the commands @kbd{1}, @kbd{2}, @kbd{3}, @kbd{4},
 with a name of a menu subtopic.  @kbd{1} goes through the first item
 in the current node's menu; @kbd{2} goes through the second item, etc.
 In the stand-alone reader, @kbd{0} goes through the last menu item;
-this is so you need not count how many entries are there.  In Emacs,
-the digit keys run the command @code{Info-nth-menu-item}.
+this is so you need not count how many entries are there.
 
   If your display supports multiple fonts, colors or underlining, and
 you are using Emacs' Info mode to read Info files, the third, sixth
@@ -996,28 +1116,15 @@ underlining.  If you need to actually count items, it is better to use
 @kbd{m} instead, and specify the name, or use @key{TAB} to quickly
 move between menu items.
 
-@subheading @kbd{e} makes Info document editable
-
-@kindex e @r{(Info mode)}
-@findex Info-edit
-@cindex edit Info document
-  The Info command @kbd{e} changes from Info mode to an ordinary
-Emacs editing mode, so that you can edit the text of the current node.
-Type @kbd{C-c C-c} to switch back to Info.  The @kbd{e} command is allowed
-only if the variable @code{Info-enable-edit} is non-@code{nil}.
-
-  The @kbd{e} command only works in Emacs, where it runs the command
-@code{Info-edit}.  The stand-alone Info reader doesn't allow you to
-edit the Info file, so typing @kbd{e} there goes to the end of the
-current node.
-
-@subheading @kbd{M-n} creates a new independent Info buffer in Emacs
+@node Create Info buffer, Emacs Info Variables, Choose menu subtopic, Advanced
+@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
+@section @kbd{M-n} creates a new independent Info buffer in Emacs
 
 @kindex M-n @r{(Info mode)}
 @findex clone-buffer
 @cindex multiple Info buffers
   If you are reading Info in Emacs, you can select a new independent
-Info buffer in another window by typing @kbd{M-n}.  The new buffer
+Info buffer in a new Emacs window by typing @kbd{M-n}.  The new buffer
 starts out as an exact copy of the old one, but you will be able to
 move independently between nodes in the two buffers.  (In Info mode,
 @kbd{M-n} runs the Emacs command @code{clone-buffer}.)
@@ -1028,89 +1135,132 @@ m} and @kbd{C-u g} go to a new node in exactly the same way that
 @kbd{m} and @kbd{g} do, but they do so in a new Info buffer which they
 select in another window.
 
-@node Info Search, Add, Advanced, Expert Info
+  Another way to produce new Info buffers in Emacs is to use a numeric
+prefix argument for the @kbd{C-h i} command (@code{info}) which
+switches to the Info buffer with that number.  Thus, @kbd{C-u 2 C-h i}
+switches to the buffer @samp{*info*<2>}, creating it if necessary.
+
+@node Emacs Info Variables, , Create Info buffer, Advanced
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
-@section How to search Info documents for specific subjects
+@section Emacs Info-mode Variables
 
-@cindex searching Info documents
-@cindex Info document as a reference
-  The commands which move between and inside nodes allow you to read
-the entire manual or its large portions.  But what if you need to find
-some information in the manual as fast as you can, and you don't know
-or don't remember in what node to look for it?  This need arises when
-you use a manual as a @dfn{reference}, or when it is impractical to
-read the entire manual before you start using the programs it
-describes.
+The following variables may modify the behavior of Info-mode in Emacs;
+you may wish to set one or several of these variables interactively,
+or in your init file.  @xref{Examining, Examining and Setting
+Variables, Examining and Setting Variables, emacs, The GNU Emacs
+Manual}.  The stand-alone Info reader program has its own set of
+variables, described in @ref{Variables,, Manipulating Variables,
+info-stnd, GNU Info}.
 
-  Info has powerful searching facilities that let you find things
-quickly.  You can search either the manual indices or its text.
+@vtable @code
+@item Info-directory-list
+The list of directories to search for Info files.  Each element is a
+string (directory name) or @code{nil} (try default directory).  If not
+initialized Info uses the environment variable @env{INFOPATH} to
+initialize it, or @code{Info-default-directory-list} if there is no
+@env{INFOPATH} variable in the environment.
 
-@kindex i @r{(Info mode)}
-@findex Info-index
-  Since most subjects related to what the manual describes should be
-indexed, you should try the index search first.  The @kbd{i} command
-prompts you for a subject and then looks up that subject in the
-indices.  If it finds an index entry with the subject you typed, it
-goes to the node to which that index entry points.  You should browse
-through that node to see whether the issue you are looking for is
-described there.  If it isn't, type @kbd{,} one or more times to go
-through additional index entries which match your subject.
+If you wish to customize the Info directory search list for both Emacs
+Info and stand-alone Info, it is best to set the @env{INFOPATH}
+environment variable, since that applies to both programs.
 
-  The @kbd{i} command finds all index entries which include the string
-you typed @emph{as a substring}.  For each match, Info shows in the
-echo area the full index entry it found.  Often, the text of the full
-index entry already gives you enough information to decide whether it
-is relevant to what you are looking for, so we recommend that you read
-what Info shows in the echo area before looking at the node it
-displays.
+@item Info-additional-directory-list
+A list of additional directories to search for Info documentation files.
+These directories are not searched for merging the @file{dir} file.
 
-  Since @kbd{i} looks for a substring, you can search for subjects even
-if you are not sure how they are spelled in the index.  For example,
-suppose you want to find something that is pertinent to commands which
-complete partial input (e.g., when you type @key{TAB}).  If you want
-to catch index entries that refer to ``complete'', ``completion'', and
-``completing'', you could type @kbd{icomplet@key{RET}}.
+@item Info-mode-hook
+Hooks run when @code{Info-mode} is called.  By default, it contains
+the hook @code{turn-on-font-lock} which enables highlighting of Info
+files.  You can change how the highlighting looks by customizing the
+faces @code{info-node}, @code{info-xref}, @code{info-xref-visited},
+@code{info-header-xref}, @code{info-header-node}, @code{info-menu-header},
+@code{info-menu-star}, and @code{info-title-@var{n}} (where @var{n}
+is the level of the section, a number between 1 and 4).  To customize
+a face, type @kbd{M-x customize-face @key{RET} @var{face} @key{RET}},
+where @var{face} is one of the face names listed here.
 
-  Info documents which describe programs should index the commands,
-options, and key sequences that the program provides.  If you are
-looking for a description of a command, an option, or a key, just type
-their names when @kbd{i} prompts you for a topic.  For example, if you
-want to read the description of what the @kbd{C-f} key does, type
-@kbd{i C - f @key{RET}}.  Here @kbd{C-f} are 3 literal characters
-@samp{C}, @samp{-}, and @samp{f}, not the ``Control-f'' command key
-you type inside Emacs to run the command bound to @kbd{C-f}.
+@item Info-fontify-maximum-menu-size
+Maximum size of menu to fontify if @code{font-lock-mode} is non-@code{nil}.
 
-  In Emacs, @kbd{i} runs the command @code{Info-index}.
+@item Info-fontify-visited-nodes
+If non-@code{nil}, menu items and cross-references pointing to visited
+nodes are displayed in the @code{info-xref-visited} face.
 
-@findex info-apropos
-If you don't know what manual documents something, try the @kbd{M-x
-info-apropos} command.  It prompts for a string and then looks up that
-string in all the indices of all the Info documents installed on your
-system.
+@item Info-use-header-line
+If non-@code{nil}, Emacs puts in the Info buffer a header line showing
+the @samp{Next}, @samp{Prev}, and @samp{Up} links.  A header line does
+not scroll with the rest of the buffer, making these links always
+visible.
 
-@kindex s @r{(Info mode)}
-@findex Info-search
-  The @kbd{s} command allows you to search a whole file for a string.
-It switches to the next node if and when that is necessary.  You
-type @kbd{s} followed by the string to search for, terminated by
-@key{RET}.  To search for the same string again, just @kbd{s} followed
-by @key{RET} will do.  The file's nodes are scanned in the order
-they are in in the file, which has no necessary relationship to the
-order that they may be in the tree structure of menus and @samp{next}
-pointers.  But normally the two orders are not very different.  In any
-case, you can always do a @kbd{b} to find out what node you have
-reached, if the header is not visible (this can happen, because @kbd{s}
-puts your cursor at the occurrence of the string, not at the beginning
-of the node).
+@item Info-hide-note-references
+As explained in earlier nodes, the Emacs version of Info normally
+hides some text in menus and cross-references.  You can completely
+disable this feature, by setting this option to @code{nil}.  Setting
+it to a value that is neither @code{nil} nor @code{t} produces an
+intermediate behavior, hiding a limited amount of text, but showing
+all text that could potentially be useful.
+
+@item Info-scroll-prefer-subnodes
+If set to a non-@code{nil} value, @key{SPC} and @key{BACKSPACE} (or
+@key{DEL}) keys in a menu visit subnodes of the current node before
+scrolling to its end or beginning, respectively.  For example, if the
+node's menu appears on the screen, the next @key{SPC} moves to a
+subnode indicated by the following menu item.  Setting this option to
+@code{nil} results in behavior similar to the stand-alone Info reader
+program, which visits the first subnode from the menu only when you
+hit the end of the current node.  The default is @code{nil}.
+
+@item Info-isearch-search
+If non-@code{nil}, isearch in Info searches through multiple nodes.
+
+@item Info-enable-active-nodes
+When set to a non-@code{nil} value, allows Info to execute Lisp code
+associated with nodes.  The Lisp code is executed when the node is
+selected.  The Lisp code to be executed should follow the node
+delimiter (the @samp{DEL} character) and an @samp{execute: } tag, like
+this:
+
+@example
+^_execute: (message "This is an active node!")
+@end example
+@end vtable
 
-@kindex M-s @r{(Info mode)}
-  In Emacs, @kbd{Meta-s} is equivalent to @kbd{s}.  That is for
-compatibility with other GNU packages that use @kbd{M-s} for a similar
-kind of search command.  Both @kbd{s} and @kbd{M-s} run in Emacs the
-command @code{Info-search}.
 
+@node Expert Info
+@chapter Info for Experts
 
-@node Add, Menus, Info Search, Expert Info
+  This chapter explains how to write an Info file by hand.  However,
+in most cases, writing a Texinfo file is better, since you can use it
+to make a printed manual or produce other formats, such as HTML and
+DocBook, as well as for generating Info files.
+
+The @code{makeinfo} command converts a Texinfo file into an Info file;
+@code{texinfo-format-region} and @code{texinfo-format-buffer} are GNU
+Emacs functions that do the same.
+
+@xref{Top,, Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU
+Documentation Format}, for how to write a Texinfo file.
+
+@xref{Creating an Info File,,, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU Documentation
+Format}, for how to create an Info file from a Texinfo file.
+
+@xref{Installing an Info File,,, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU
+Documentation Format}, for how to install an Info file after you
+have created one.
+
+However, if you want to edit an Info file manually and install it manually,
+here is how.
+
+@menu
+* Add::                   Describes how to add new nodes to the hierarchy.
+                            Also tells what nodes look like.
+* Menus::                 How to add to or create menus in Info nodes.
+* Cross-refs::            How to add cross-references to Info nodes.
+* Tags::                  How to make tags tables for Info files.
+* Checking::              Checking an Info File.
+@end menu
+
+@node Add, Menus,  , Expert Info
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
 @section Adding a new node to Info
 
@@ -1123,14 +1273,6 @@ Create some nodes, in some file, to document that topic.
 Put that topic in the menu in the directory.  @xref{Menus, Menu}.
 @end enumerate
 
-  Usually, the way to create the nodes is with Texinfo (@pxref{Top,,
-Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU Documentation Format});
-this has the advantage that you can also make a printed manual or HTML
-from them.  You would use the @samp{@@dircategory} and
-@samp{@@direntry} commands to put the manual into the Info directory.
-However, if you want to edit an Info file manually and install it
-manually, here is how.
-
 @cindex node delimiters
   The new node can live in an existing documentation file, or in a new
 one.  It must have a @samp{^_} character before it (invisible to the
@@ -1165,7 +1307,7 @@ in the names is insignificant.
 what appears after the @samp{Node: } in that node's first line.  For
 example, this node's name is @samp{Add}.  A node in another file is
 named by @samp{(@var{filename})@var{node-within-file}}, as in
-@samp{(info)Add} for this node.  If the file name starts with ``./'',
+@samp{(info)Add} for this node.  If the file name starts with @samp{./},
 then it is relative to the current directory; otherwise, it is
 relative starting from the standard directory for Info files of your
 site.  The name @samp{(@var{filename})Top} can be abbreviated to just
@@ -1223,7 +1365,7 @@ short abbreviations.  In a long menu, it is a good idea to capitalize
 the beginning of each item name which is the minimum acceptable
 abbreviation for it (a long menu is more than 5 or so entries).
 
-  The nodes listed in a node's menu are called its ``subnodes'', and it
+  The nodes listed in a node's menu are called its ``subnodes,'' and it
 is their ``superior''.  They should each have an @samp{Up:} pointing at
 the superior.  It is often useful to arrange all or most of the subnodes
 in a sequence of @samp{Next} and @samp{Previous} pointers so that
@@ -1237,7 +1379,7 @@ Info's files live in that file directory, but they do not have to; and
 files in that directory are not automatically listed in the Info
 Directory node.
 
-  Also, although the Info node graph is claimed to be a ``hierarchy'',
+  Also, although the Info node graph is claimed to be a ``hierarchy,''
 in fact it can be @emph{any} directed graph.  Shared structures and
 pointer cycles are perfectly possible, and can be used if they are
 appropriate to the meaning to be expressed.  There is no need for all
@@ -1245,9 +1387,9 @@ the nodes in a file to form a connected structure.  In fact, this file
 has two connected components.  You are in one of them, which is under
 the node @samp{Top}; the other contains the node @samp{Help} which the
 @kbd{h} command goes to.  In fact, since there is no garbage
-collector, nothing terrible happens if a substructure is not pointed
-to, but such a substructure is rather useless since nobody can
-ever find out that it exists.
+collector on the node graph, nothing terrible happens if a substructure
+is not pointed to, but such a substructure is rather useless since nobody
+can ever find out that it exists.
 
 @node Cross-refs, Tags, Menus, Expert Info
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
@@ -1291,44 +1433,11 @@ cannot expect this node to have a @samp{Next}, @samp{Previous} or
 >> Type @kbd{l} to return to the node where the cross reference was.
 @end format
 
-@node Help-Q,  , Help-Int, Getting Started
-@comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
-@section Quitting Info
-
-@kindex q @r{(Info mode)}
-@findex Info-exit
-@cindex quitting Info mode
-  To get out of Info, back to what you were doing before, type @kbd{q}
-for @dfn{Quit}.  This runs @code{Info-exit} in Emacs.
-
-  This is the end of the basic course on using Info.  You have learned
-how to move in an Info document, and how to follow menus and cross
-references.  This makes you ready for reading manuals top to bottom,
-as new users should do when they learn a new package.
-
-  Another set of Info commands is useful when you need to find
-something quickly in a manual---that is, when you need to use a manual
-as a reference rather than as a tutorial.  We urge you to learn
-these search commands as well.  If you want to do that now, follow this
-cross reference to @ref{Info Search}.
-
-Yet another set of commands are meant for experienced users; you can
-find them by looking in the Directory node for documentation on Info.
-Finding them will be a good exercise in using Info in the usual
-manner.
-
-@format
->> Type @kbd{d} to go to the Info directory node; then type
-   @kbd{mInfo} and Return, to get to the node about Info and
-   see what other help is available.
-@end format
-
-
 @node Tags, Checking, Cross-refs, Expert Info
 @comment  node-name,  next,  previous,  up
 @section Tags Tables for Info Files
 
-@cindex tags tables in info files
+@cindex tags tables in Info files
   You can speed up the access to nodes of a large Info file by giving
 it a tags table.  Unlike the tags table for a program, the tags table for
 an Info file lives inside the file itself and is used
@@ -1368,8 +1477,7 @@ the beginning of the node's header (ending just after the node name),
 a @samp{DEL} character, and the character position in the file of the
 beginning of the node.
 
-
-@node Checking, Emacs Info Variables, Tags, Expert Info
+@node Checking, , Tags, Expert Info
 @section Checking an Info File
 
 When creating an Info file, it is easy to forget the name of a node when
@@ -1388,101 +1496,6 @@ usually few.
 To check an Info file, do @kbd{M-x Info-validate} while looking at any
 node of the file with Emacs Info mode.
 
-@node Emacs Info Variables, , Checking, Expert Info
-@section Emacs Info-mode Variables
-
-The following variables may modify the behavior of Info-mode in Emacs;
-you may wish to set one or several of these variables interactively, or
-in your @file{~/.emacs} init file.  @xref{Examining, Examining and Setting
-Variables, Examining and Setting Variables, emacs, The GNU Emacs
-Manual}.  The stand-alone Info reader program has its own set of
-variables, described in @ref{Variables,, Manipulating Variables,
-info-stnd, GNU Info}.
-
-@vtable @code
-@item Info-directory-list
-The list of directories to search for Info files.  Each element is a
-string (directory name) or @code{nil} (try default directory).  If not
-initialized Info uses the environment variable @env{INFOPATH} to
-initialize it, or @code{Info-default-directory-list} if there is no
-@env{INFOPATH} variable in the environment.
-
-If you wish to customize the Info directory search list for both Emacs
-info and stand-alone Info, it is best to set the @env{INFOPATH}
-environment variable, since that applies to both programs.
-
-@item Info-additional-directory-list
-A list of additional directories to search for Info documentation files.
-These directories are not searched for merging the @file{dir} file.
-
-@item Info-fontify
-When set to a non-@code{nil} value, enables highlighting of Info
-files.  The default is @code{t}.  You can change how the highlighting
-looks by customizing the faces @code{info-node}, @code{info-xref},
-@code{info-header-xref}, @code{info-header-node}, @code{info-menu-5},
-@code{info-menu-header}, and @code{info-title-@var{n}-face} (where
-@var{n} is the level of the section, a number between 1 and 4).  To
-customize a face, type @kbd{M-x customize-face @key{RET} @var{face}
-@key{RET}}, where @var{face} is one of the face names listed here.
-
-@item Info-use-header-line
-If non-@code{nil}, Emacs puts in the Info buffer a header line showing
-the @samp{Next}, @samp{Prev}, and @samp{Up} links.  A header line does
-not scroll with the rest of the buffer, making these links always
-visible.
-
-@item Info-hide-note-references
-As explained in earlier nodes, the Emacs version of Info normally
-hides some text in menus and cross-references.  You can completely
-disable this feature, by setting this option to @code{nil}.  Setting
-it to a value that is neither @code{nil} nor @code{t} produces an
-intermediate behavior, hiding a limited amount of text, but showing
-all text that could potentially be useful.
-
-@item Info-scroll-prefer-subnodes
-If set to a non-@code{nil} value, @key{SPC} and @key{BACKSPACE} (or
-@key{DEL}) keys in a menu visit subnodes of the current node before
-scrolling to its end or beginning, respectively.  For example, if the
-node's menu appears on the screen, the next @key{SPC} moves to a
-subnode indicated by the following menu item.  Setting this option to
-@code{nil} results in behavior similar to the stand-alone Info reader
-program, which visits the first subnode from the menu only when you
-hit the end of the current node.  The default is @code{nil}.
-
-@item Info-enable-active-nodes
-When set to a non-@code{nil} value, allows Info to execute Lisp code
-associated with nodes.  The Lisp code is executed when the node is
-selected.  The Lisp code to be executed should follow the node
-delimiter (the @samp{DEL} character) and an @samp{execute: } tag, like
-this:
-
-@example
-^_execute: (message "This is an active node!")
-@end example
-
-@item Info-enable-edit
-Set to @code{nil}, disables the @samp{e} (@code{Info-edit}) command.  A
-non-@code{nil} value enables it.  @xref{Add, Edit}.
-@end vtable
-
-
-@node Creating an Info File
-@chapter Creating an Info File from a Texinfo File
-
-@code{makeinfo} is a utility that converts a Texinfo file into an Info
-file; @code{texinfo-format-region} and @code{texinfo-format-buffer} are
-GNU Emacs functions that do the same.
-
-@xref{Top,, Overview of Texinfo, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU
-Documentation Format}, to learn how to write a Texinfo file.
-
-@xref{Creating an Info File,,, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU Documentation
-Format}, to learn how to create an Info file from a Texinfo file.
-
-@xref{Installing an Info File,,, texinfo, Texinfo: The GNU
-Documentation Format}, to learn how to install an Info file after you
-have created one.
-
 @node Index
 @unnumbered Index
 
index fb8f463..2ea37bf 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.34.
-.TH INFOKEY "1" "December 2004" "infokey 4.8" "User Commands"
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH INFOKEY "1" "September 2008" "infokey 4.13" "User Commands"
 .SH NAME
 infokey \- compile customizations for Info
 .SH SYNOPSIS
@@ -23,10 +23,11 @@ Email bug reports to bug\-texinfo@gnu.org,
 general questions and discussion to help\-texinfo@gnu.org.
 Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
 .SH COPYRIGHT
-Copyright \(co 2003 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-There is NO warranty.  You may redistribute this software
-under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
-For more information about these matters, see the files named COPYING.
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
 .SH "SEE ALSO"
 The full documentation for
 .B infokey
index 004d5d0..47ae5d7 100644 (file)
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.34.
-.TH INSTALL-INFO "1" "December 2004" "install-info 4.8" "User Commands"
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH INSTALL-INFO "1" "September 2008" "install-info 4.13" "User Commands"
 .SH NAME
 install-info \- update info/dir entries
 .SH SYNOPSIS
 .B install-info
 [\fIOPTION\fR]... [\fIINFO-FILE \fR[\fIDIR-FILE\fR]]
 .SH DESCRIPTION
-Install or delete dir entries from INFO\-FILE in the Info directory file
-DIR\-FILE.
+Add or remove entries in INFO\-FILE from the Info directory DIR\-FILE.
 .SH OPTIONS
 .TP
+\fB\-\-debug\fR
+report what is being done.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-delete\fR
 delete existing entries for INFO\-FILE from DIR\-FILE;
 don't insert any new entries.
 .TP
+\fB\-\-description\fR=\fITEXT\fR
+the description of the entry is TEXT; used with
+the \fB\-\-name\fR option to become synonymous with the
+\fB\-\-entry\fR option.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-dir\-file\fR=\fINAME\fR
-specify file name of Info directory file.
-This is equivalent to using the DIR\-FILE argument.
+specify file name of Info directory file;
+equivalent to using the DIR\-FILE argument.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dry\-run\fR
+same as \fB\-\-test\fR.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-entry\fR=\fITEXT\fR
 insert TEXT as an Info directory entry.
-TEXT should have the form of an Info menu item line
-plus zero or more extra lines starting with whitespace.
-If you specify more than one entry, they are all added.
+TEXT is written as an Info menu item line followed
+.IP
+by zero or more extra lines starting with whitespace.
+.IP
+If you specify more than one entry, all are added.
 If you don't specify any entries, they are determined
+.IP
 from information in the Info file itself.
+.IP
+When removing, TEXT specifies the entry to remove.
+TEXT is only removed as a last resort, if the
+entry as determined from the Info file is not present,
+and the basename of the Info file isn't found either.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-help\fR
 display this help and exit.
 .TP
-\fB\-\-info\-file\fR=\fIFILE\fR
-specify Info file to install in the directory.
-This is equivalent to using the INFO\-FILE argument.
-.TP
 \fB\-\-info\-dir\fR=\fIDIR\fR
 same as \fB\-\-dir\-file\fR=\fIDIR\fR/dir.
 .TP
+\fB\-\-info\-file\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+specify Info file to install in the directory;
+equivalent to using the INFO\-FILE argument.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-item\fR=\fITEXT\fR
-same as \fB\-\-entry\fR TEXT.
-An Info directory entry is actually a menu item.
+same as \fB\-\-entry\fR=\fITEXT\fR.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-keep\-old\fR
+do not replace entries, or remove empty sections.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-menuentry\fR=\fITEXT\fR
+same as \fB\-\-name\fR=\fITEXT\fR.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-name\fR=\fITEXT\fR
+the name of the entry is TEXT; used with \fB\-\-description\fR
+to become synonymous with the \fB\-\-entry\fR option.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-no\-indent\fR
+do not format new entries in the DIR file.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-quiet\fR
 suppress warnings.
 .TP
+\fB\-\-regex\fR=\fIR\fR
+put this file's entries in all sections that match the
+regular expression R (ignoring case).
+.TP
 \fB\-\-remove\fR
 same as \fB\-\-delete\fR.
 .TP
+\fB\-\-remove\-exactly\fR
+only remove if the info file name matches exactly;
+suffixes such as .info and .gz are not ignored.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-section\fR=\fISEC\fR
-put this file's entries in section SEC of the directory.
+put entries in section SEC of the directory.
 If you specify more than one section, all the entries
+.IP
 are added in each of the sections.
+.IP
 If you don't specify any sections, they are determined
+.IP
 from information in the Info file itself.
 .TP
+\fB\-\-section\fR R SEC
+equivalent to \fB\-\-regex\fR=\fIR\fR \fB\-\-section\fR=\fISEC\fR \fB\-\-add\-once\fR.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-silent\fR
+suppress warnings.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-test\fR
+suppress updating of DIR\-FILE.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-version\fR
 display version information and exit.
 .SH "REPORTING BUGS"
@@ -60,10 +110,11 @@ Email bug reports to bug\-texinfo@gnu.org,
 general questions and discussion to help\-texinfo@gnu.org.
 Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
 .SH COPYRIGHT
-Copyright \(co 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-There is NO warranty.  You may redistribute this software
-under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
-For more information about these matters, see the files named COPYING.
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
 .SH "SEE ALSO"
 The full documentation for
 .B install-info
index 7b46491..3753a0f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.34.
-.TH MAKEINFO "1" "December 2004" "makeinfo 4.8" "User Commands"
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH MAKEINFO "1" "September 2008" "makeinfo 4.13" "User Commands"
 .SH NAME
 makeinfo \- translate Texinfo documents
 .SH SYNOPSIS
@@ -13,6 +13,9 @@ Info files suitable for reading online with Emacs or standalone GNU Info.
 \fB\-\-error\-limit\fR=\fINUM\fR
 quit after NUM errors (default 100).
 .TP
+\fB\-\-document\-language\fR=\fISTR\fR locale to use in translating Texinfo keywords
+for the output document (default C).
+.TP
 \fB\-\-force\fR
 preserve output even if errors.
 .TP
@@ -25,9 +28,6 @@ suppress node cross\-reference validation.
 \fB\-\-no\-warn\fR
 suppress warnings (but not errors).
 .TP
-\fB\-\-reference\-limit\fR=\fINUM\fR
-warn about at most NUM references (default 1000).
-.TP
 \fB\-v\fR, \fB\-\-verbose\fR
 explain what is being done.
 .TP
@@ -48,8 +48,8 @@ output Texinfo XML rather than Info.
 output plain text rather than Info.
 .SS "General output options:"
 .TP
-\fB\-E\fR, \fB\-\-macro\-expand\fR FILE
-output macro\-expanded source to FILE.
+\fB\-E\fR, \fB\-\-macro\-expand\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+output macro\-expanded source to FILE,
 ignoring any @setfilename.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-no\-headers\fR
@@ -59,19 +59,22 @@ or from HTML (thus producing shorter output);
 also, write to standard output by default.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-no\-split\fR
-suppress splitting of Info or HTML output,
+suppress the splitting of Info or HTML output,
 generate only one output file.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-number\-sections\fR
 output chapter and sectioning numbers.
 .TP
 \fB\-o\fR, \fB\-\-output\fR=\fIFILE\fR
-output to FILE (directory if split HTML),
+output to FILE (or directory if split HTML).
 .SS "Options for Info and plain text:"
 .TP
+\fB\-\-disable\-encoding\fR
+do not output accented and special characters
+in Info output based on @documentencoding.
+.TP
 \fB\-\-enable\-encoding\fR
-output accented and special characters in
-Info output based on @documentencoding.
+override \fB\-\-disable\-encoding\fR (default).
 .TP
 \fB\-\-fill\-column\fR=\fINUM\fR
 break Info lines at NUM characters (default 72).
@@ -79,9 +82,8 @@ break Info lines at NUM characters (default 72).
 \fB\-\-footnote\-style\fR=\fISTYLE\fR
 output footnotes in Info according to STYLE:
 `separate' to put them in their own node;
-`end' to put them at the end of the node
-.IP
-in which they are defined (default).
+`end' to put them at the end of the node, in
+which they are defined (this is the default).
 .TP
 \fB\-\-paragraph\-indent\fR=\fIVAL\fR
 indent Info paragraphs by VAL spaces (default 3).
@@ -95,6 +97,15 @@ split Info files at size NUM (default 300000).
 \fB\-\-css\-include\fR=\fIFILE\fR
 include FILE in HTML <style> output;
 read stdin if FILE is \-.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-css\-ref\fR=\fIURL\fR
+generate reference to a CSS file.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-internal\-links\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+produce list of internal links in FILE.
+.TP
+\fB\-\-transliterate\-file\-names\fR
+produce file names in ASCII transliteration.
 .SS "Options for XML and Docbook:"
 .TP
 \fB\-\-output\-indent\fR=\fIVAL\fR
@@ -154,9 +165,9 @@ do not process @iftex and @tex text.
 .TP
 \fB\-\-no\-ifxml\fR
 do not process @ifxml and @xml text.
-.IP
+.P
 Also, for the \fB\-\-no\-ifFORMAT\fR options, do process @ifnotFORMAT text.
-.IP
+.P
 The defaults for the @if... conditionals depend on the output format:
 if generating HTML, \fB\-\-ifhtml\fR is on and the others are off;
 if generating Info, \fB\-\-ifinfo\fR is on and the others are off;
@@ -178,19 +189,25 @@ write DocBook XML to @setfilename
 .TP
 makeinfo \fB\-\-no\-headers\fR foo.texi
 write plain text to standard output
-.IP
-makeinfo \fB\-\-html\fR \fB\-\-no\-headers\fR foo.texi write html without node lines, menus
-makeinfo \fB\-\-number\-sections\fR foo.texi   write Info with numbered sections
-makeinfo \fB\-\-no\-split\fR foo.texi          write one Info file however big
+.TP
+makeinfo \fB\-\-html\fR \fB\-\-no\-headers\fR foo.texi
+write html without node lines, menus
+.TP
+makeinfo \fB\-\-number\-sections\fR foo.texi
+write Info with numbered sections
+.TP
+makeinfo \fB\-\-no\-split\fR foo.texi
+write one Info file however big
 .SH "REPORTING BUGS"
 Email bug reports to bug\-texinfo@gnu.org,
 general questions and discussion to help\-texinfo@gnu.org.
 Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
 .SH COPYRIGHT
-Copyright \(co 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-There is NO warranty.  You may redistribute this software
-under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
-For more information about these matters, see the files named COPYING.
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
 .SH "SEE ALSO"
 The full documentation for
 .B makeinfo
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/doc/pdftexi2dvi.1 b/contrib/texinfo/doc/pdftexi2dvi.1
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..0319b28
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,187 @@
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH TEXI2DVI "1" "September 2008" "texi2dvi 1.135" "User Commands"
+.SH NAME
+texi2dvi \- convert Texinfo documents to PDF
+.SH SYNOPSIS
+.B texi2dvi
+[\fIOPTION\fR]... \fIFILE\fR...
+.SH DESCRIPTION
+Run each Texinfo or (La)TeX FILE through TeX in turn until all
+cross\-references are resolved, building all indices.  The directory
+containing each FILE is searched for included files.  The suffix of FILE
+is used to determine its language ((La)TeX or Texinfo).  To process
+(e)plain TeX files, set the environment variable LATEX=tex.
+.PP
+In order to make texi2dvi a drop\-in replacement of TeX/LaTeX in AUC\-TeX,
+the FILE may also be composed of the following simple TeX commands.
+.TP
+`\einput{FILE}'
+the actual file to compile
+.TP
+`\enonstopmode'
+same as \fB\-\-batch\fR
+.PP
+Makeinfo is used to perform Texinfo macro expansion before running TeX
+when needed.
+.SS "General options:"
+.TP
+\fB\-b\fR, \fB\-\-batch\fR
+no interaction
+.TP
+\fB\-D\fR, \fB\-\-debug\fR
+turn on shell debugging (set \fB\-x\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-h\fR, \fB\-\-help\fR
+display this help and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-o\fR, \fB\-\-output\fR=\fIOFILE\fR
+leave output in OFILE (implies \fB\-\-clean\fR);
+only one input FILE may be specified in this case
+.TP
+\fB\-q\fR, \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+no output unless errors (implies \fB\-\-batch\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-s\fR, \fB\-\-silent\fR
+same as \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-v\fR, \fB\-\-version\fR
+display version information and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-V\fR, \fB\-\-verbose\fR
+report on what is done
+.SS "TeX tuning:"
+.TP
+\-@
+use @input instead of \einput for preloaded Texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvi\fR
+output a DVI file [default]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvipdf\fR
+output a PDF file via DVI (using dvipdf)
+.TP
+\fB\-e\fR, \fB\-E\fR, \fB\-\-expand\fR
+force macro expansion using makeinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-I\fR DIR
+search DIR for Texinfo files
+.TP
+\fB\-l\fR, \fB\-\-language\fR=\fILANG\fR
+specify LANG for FILE, either latex or texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-no\-line\-error\fR
+do not pass \fB\-\-file\-line\-error\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-p\fR, \fB\-\-pdf\fR
+use pdftex or pdflatex for processing
+.TP
+\fB\-r\fR, \fB\-\-recode\fR
+call recode before TeX to translate input
+.TP
+\fB\-\-recode\-from\fR=\fIENC\fR
+recode from ENC to the @documentencoding
+.TP
+\fB\-\-src\-specials\fR
+pass \fB\-\-src\-specials\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-t\fR, \fB\-\-command\fR=\fICMD\fR
+insert CMD in copy of input file
+.TP
+or \fB\-\-texinfo\fR=\fICMD\fR
+multiple values accumulate
+.TP
+\fB\-\-translate\-file\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+use given charset translation file for TeX
+.SS "Build modes:"
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\fR=\fIMODE\fR
+specify the treatment of auxiliary files [local]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-tidy\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fItidy\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-c\fR, \fB\-\-clean\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fIclean\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIDIR\fR
+specify where the tidy compilation is performed;
+implies \fB\-\-tidy\fR;
+defaults to TEXI2DVI_BUILD_DIRECTORY [.]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-mostly\-clean\fR
+remove the auxiliary files and directories
+but not the output
+.PP
+The MODE specifies where the TeX compilation takes place, and, as a
+consequence, how auxiliary files are treated.  The build mode
+can also be set using the environment variable TEXI2DVI_BUILD_MODE.
+.SS "Valid MODEs are:"
+.TP
+`local'
+compile in the current directory, leaving all the auxiliary
+files around.  This is the traditional TeX use.
+.TP
+`tidy'
+compile in a local *.t2d directory, where the auxiliary files
+are left.  Output files are copied back to the original file.
+.TP
+`clean'
+same as `tidy', but remove the auxiliary directory afterwards.
+Every compilation therefore requires the full cycle.
+.SS "Using the `tidy' mode brings several advantages:"
+.TP
+\-
+the current directory is not cluttered with plethora of temporary files.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be even reduced using \fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIdir\fR: all the *.t2d
+directories are stored there.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be reduced to zero using, e.g., \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR/tmp/$USER.t2d
+or \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR$HOME/.t2d.
+.TP
+\-
+the output file is updated after every succesful TeX run, for
+sake of concurrent visualization of the output.  In a `local' build
+the viewer stops during the whole TeX run.
+.TP
+\-
+if the compilation fails, the previous state of the output file
+is preserved.
+.TP
+\-
+PDF and DVI compilation are kept in separate subdirectories
+preventing any possibility of auxiliary file incompatibility.
+.PP
+On the other hand, because `tidy' compilation takes place in another
+directory, occasionally TeX won't be able to find some files (e.g., when
+using \egraphicspath): in that case use \fB\-I\fR to specify the additional
+directories to consider.
+.PP
+The values of the BIBTEX, LATEX (or PDFLATEX), MAKEINDEX, MAKEINFO,
+TEX (or PDFTEX), TEXINDEX, and THUMBPDF environment variables are used
+to run those commands, if they are set.  Any CMD strings are added
+after @setfilename for Texinfo input, in the first line for LaTeX input.
+.SH "REPORTING BUGS"
+Email bug reports to <bug\-texinfo@gnu.org>,
+general questions and discussion to <help\-texinfo@gnu.org>.
+Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
+.SH COPYRIGHT
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
+.SH "SEE ALSO"
+The full documentation for
+.B texi2dvi
+is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the
+.B info
+and
+.B texi2dvi
+programs are properly installed at your site, the command
+.IP
+.B info texi2dvi
+.PP
+should give you access to the complete manual.
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2dvi.1 b/contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2dvi.1
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..fbfc0de
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,187 @@
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH TEXI2DVI "1" "September 2008" "texi2dvi 1.135" "User Commands"
+.SH NAME
+texi2dvi \- convert Texinfo documents to DVI
+.SH SYNOPSIS
+.B texi2dvi
+[\fIOPTION\fR]... \fIFILE\fR...
+.SH DESCRIPTION
+Run each Texinfo or (La)TeX FILE through TeX in turn until all
+cross\-references are resolved, building all indices.  The directory
+containing each FILE is searched for included files.  The suffix of FILE
+is used to determine its language ((La)TeX or Texinfo).  To process
+(e)plain TeX files, set the environment variable LATEX=tex.
+.PP
+In order to make texi2dvi a drop\-in replacement of TeX/LaTeX in AUC\-TeX,
+the FILE may also be composed of the following simple TeX commands.
+.TP
+`\einput{FILE}'
+the actual file to compile
+.TP
+`\enonstopmode'
+same as \fB\-\-batch\fR
+.PP
+Makeinfo is used to perform Texinfo macro expansion before running TeX
+when needed.
+.SS "General options:"
+.TP
+\fB\-b\fR, \fB\-\-batch\fR
+no interaction
+.TP
+\fB\-D\fR, \fB\-\-debug\fR
+turn on shell debugging (set \fB\-x\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-h\fR, \fB\-\-help\fR
+display this help and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-o\fR, \fB\-\-output\fR=\fIOFILE\fR
+leave output in OFILE (implies \fB\-\-clean\fR);
+only one input FILE may be specified in this case
+.TP
+\fB\-q\fR, \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+no output unless errors (implies \fB\-\-batch\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-s\fR, \fB\-\-silent\fR
+same as \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-v\fR, \fB\-\-version\fR
+display version information and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-V\fR, \fB\-\-verbose\fR
+report on what is done
+.SS "TeX tuning:"
+.TP
+\-@
+use @input instead of \einput for preloaded Texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvi\fR
+output a DVI file [default]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvipdf\fR
+output a PDF file via DVI (using dvipdf)
+.TP
+\fB\-e\fR, \fB\-E\fR, \fB\-\-expand\fR
+force macro expansion using makeinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-I\fR DIR
+search DIR for Texinfo files
+.TP
+\fB\-l\fR, \fB\-\-language\fR=\fILANG\fR
+specify LANG for FILE, either latex or texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-no\-line\-error\fR
+do not pass \fB\-\-file\-line\-error\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-p\fR, \fB\-\-pdf\fR
+use pdftex or pdflatex for processing
+.TP
+\fB\-r\fR, \fB\-\-recode\fR
+call recode before TeX to translate input
+.TP
+\fB\-\-recode\-from\fR=\fIENC\fR
+recode from ENC to the @documentencoding
+.TP
+\fB\-\-src\-specials\fR
+pass \fB\-\-src\-specials\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-t\fR, \fB\-\-command\fR=\fICMD\fR
+insert CMD in copy of input file
+.TP
+or \fB\-\-texinfo\fR=\fICMD\fR
+multiple values accumulate
+.TP
+\fB\-\-translate\-file\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+use given charset translation file for TeX
+.SS "Build modes:"
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\fR=\fIMODE\fR
+specify the treatment of auxiliary files [local]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-tidy\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fItidy\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-c\fR, \fB\-\-clean\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fIclean\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIDIR\fR
+specify where the tidy compilation is performed;
+implies \fB\-\-tidy\fR;
+defaults to TEXI2DVI_BUILD_DIRECTORY [.]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-mostly\-clean\fR
+remove the auxiliary files and directories
+but not the output
+.PP
+The MODE specifies where the TeX compilation takes place, and, as a
+consequence, how auxiliary files are treated.  The build mode
+can also be set using the environment variable TEXI2DVI_BUILD_MODE.
+.SS "Valid MODEs are:"
+.TP
+`local'
+compile in the current directory, leaving all the auxiliary
+files around.  This is the traditional TeX use.
+.TP
+`tidy'
+compile in a local *.t2d directory, where the auxiliary files
+are left.  Output files are copied back to the original file.
+.TP
+`clean'
+same as `tidy', but remove the auxiliary directory afterwards.
+Every compilation therefore requires the full cycle.
+.SS "Using the `tidy' mode brings several advantages:"
+.TP
+\-
+the current directory is not cluttered with plethora of temporary files.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be even reduced using \fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIdir\fR: all the *.t2d
+directories are stored there.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be reduced to zero using, e.g., \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR/tmp/$USER.t2d
+or \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR$HOME/.t2d.
+.TP
+\-
+the output file is updated after every succesful TeX run, for
+sake of concurrent visualization of the output.  In a `local' build
+the viewer stops during the whole TeX run.
+.TP
+\-
+if the compilation fails, the previous state of the output file
+is preserved.
+.TP
+\-
+PDF and DVI compilation are kept in separate subdirectories
+preventing any possibility of auxiliary file incompatibility.
+.PP
+On the other hand, because `tidy' compilation takes place in another
+directory, occasionally TeX won't be able to find some files (e.g., when
+using \egraphicspath): in that case use \fB\-I\fR to specify the additional
+directories to consider.
+.PP
+The values of the BIBTEX, LATEX (or PDFLATEX), MAKEINDEX, MAKEINFO,
+TEX (or PDFTEX), TEXINDEX, and THUMBPDF environment variables are used
+to run those commands, if they are set.  Any CMD strings are added
+after @setfilename for Texinfo input, in the first line for LaTeX input.
+.SH "REPORTING BUGS"
+Email bug reports to <bug\-texinfo@gnu.org>,
+general questions and discussion to <help\-texinfo@gnu.org>.
+Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
+.SH COPYRIGHT
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
+.SH "SEE ALSO"
+The full documentation for
+.B texi2dvi
+is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the
+.B info
+and
+.B texi2dvi
+programs are properly installed at your site, the command
+.IP
+.B info texi2dvi
+.PP
+should give you access to the complete manual.
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2pdf.1 b/contrib/texinfo/doc/texi2pdf.1
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..0319b28
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,187 @@
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH TEXI2DVI "1" "September 2008" "texi2dvi 1.135" "User Commands"
+.SH NAME
+texi2dvi \- convert Texinfo documents to PDF
+.SH SYNOPSIS
+.B texi2dvi
+[\fIOPTION\fR]... \fIFILE\fR...
+.SH DESCRIPTION
+Run each Texinfo or (La)TeX FILE through TeX in turn until all
+cross\-references are resolved, building all indices.  The directory
+containing each FILE is searched for included files.  The suffix of FILE
+is used to determine its language ((La)TeX or Texinfo).  To process
+(e)plain TeX files, set the environment variable LATEX=tex.
+.PP
+In order to make texi2dvi a drop\-in replacement of TeX/LaTeX in AUC\-TeX,
+the FILE may also be composed of the following simple TeX commands.
+.TP
+`\einput{FILE}'
+the actual file to compile
+.TP
+`\enonstopmode'
+same as \fB\-\-batch\fR
+.PP
+Makeinfo is used to perform Texinfo macro expansion before running TeX
+when needed.
+.SS "General options:"
+.TP
+\fB\-b\fR, \fB\-\-batch\fR
+no interaction
+.TP
+\fB\-D\fR, \fB\-\-debug\fR
+turn on shell debugging (set \fB\-x\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-h\fR, \fB\-\-help\fR
+display this help and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-o\fR, \fB\-\-output\fR=\fIOFILE\fR
+leave output in OFILE (implies \fB\-\-clean\fR);
+only one input FILE may be specified in this case
+.TP
+\fB\-q\fR, \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+no output unless errors (implies \fB\-\-batch\fR)
+.TP
+\fB\-s\fR, \fB\-\-silent\fR
+same as \fB\-\-quiet\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-v\fR, \fB\-\-version\fR
+display version information and exit successfully
+.TP
+\fB\-V\fR, \fB\-\-verbose\fR
+report on what is done
+.SS "TeX tuning:"
+.TP
+\-@
+use @input instead of \einput for preloaded Texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvi\fR
+output a DVI file [default]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-dvipdf\fR
+output a PDF file via DVI (using dvipdf)
+.TP
+\fB\-e\fR, \fB\-E\fR, \fB\-\-expand\fR
+force macro expansion using makeinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-I\fR DIR
+search DIR for Texinfo files
+.TP
+\fB\-l\fR, \fB\-\-language\fR=\fILANG\fR
+specify LANG for FILE, either latex or texinfo
+.TP
+\fB\-\-no\-line\-error\fR
+do not pass \fB\-\-file\-line\-error\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-p\fR, \fB\-\-pdf\fR
+use pdftex or pdflatex for processing
+.TP
+\fB\-r\fR, \fB\-\-recode\fR
+call recode before TeX to translate input
+.TP
+\fB\-\-recode\-from\fR=\fIENC\fR
+recode from ENC to the @documentencoding
+.TP
+\fB\-\-src\-specials\fR
+pass \fB\-\-src\-specials\fR to TeX
+.TP
+\fB\-t\fR, \fB\-\-command\fR=\fICMD\fR
+insert CMD in copy of input file
+.TP
+or \fB\-\-texinfo\fR=\fICMD\fR
+multiple values accumulate
+.TP
+\fB\-\-translate\-file\fR=\fIFILE\fR
+use given charset translation file for TeX
+.SS "Build modes:"
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\fR=\fIMODE\fR
+specify the treatment of auxiliary files [local]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-tidy\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fItidy\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-c\fR, \fB\-\-clean\fR
+same as \fB\-\-build\fR=\fIclean\fR
+.TP
+\fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIDIR\fR
+specify where the tidy compilation is performed;
+implies \fB\-\-tidy\fR;
+defaults to TEXI2DVI_BUILD_DIRECTORY [.]
+.TP
+\fB\-\-mostly\-clean\fR
+remove the auxiliary files and directories
+but not the output
+.PP
+The MODE specifies where the TeX compilation takes place, and, as a
+consequence, how auxiliary files are treated.  The build mode
+can also be set using the environment variable TEXI2DVI_BUILD_MODE.
+.SS "Valid MODEs are:"
+.TP
+`local'
+compile in the current directory, leaving all the auxiliary
+files around.  This is the traditional TeX use.
+.TP
+`tidy'
+compile in a local *.t2d directory, where the auxiliary files
+are left.  Output files are copied back to the original file.
+.TP
+`clean'
+same as `tidy', but remove the auxiliary directory afterwards.
+Every compilation therefore requires the full cycle.
+.SS "Using the `tidy' mode brings several advantages:"
+.TP
+\-
+the current directory is not cluttered with plethora of temporary files.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be even reduced using \fB\-\-build\-dir\fR=\fIdir\fR: all the *.t2d
+directories are stored there.
+.TP
+\-
+clutter can be reduced to zero using, e.g., \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR/tmp/$USER.t2d
+or \fB\-\-build\-dir=\fR$HOME/.t2d.
+.TP
+\-
+the output file is updated after every succesful TeX run, for
+sake of concurrent visualization of the output.  In a `local' build
+the viewer stops during the whole TeX run.
+.TP
+\-
+if the compilation fails, the previous state of the output file
+is preserved.
+.TP
+\-
+PDF and DVI compilation are kept in separate subdirectories
+preventing any possibility of auxiliary file incompatibility.
+.PP
+On the other hand, because `tidy' compilation takes place in another
+directory, occasionally TeX won't be able to find some files (e.g., when
+using \egraphicspath): in that case use \fB\-I\fR to specify the additional
+directories to consider.
+.PP
+The values of the BIBTEX, LATEX (or PDFLATEX), MAKEINDEX, MAKEINFO,
+TEX (or PDFTEX), TEXINDEX, and THUMBPDF environment variables are used
+to run those commands, if they are set.  Any CMD strings are added
+after @setfilename for Texinfo input, in the first line for LaTeX input.
+.SH "REPORTING BUGS"
+Email bug reports to <bug\-texinfo@gnu.org>,
+general questions and discussion to <help\-texinfo@gnu.org>.
+Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
+.SH COPYRIGHT
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
+.SH "SEE ALSO"
+The full documentation for
+.B texi2dvi
+is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the
+.B info
+and
+.B texi2dvi
+programs are properly installed at your site, the command
+.IP
+.B info texi2dvi
+.PP
+should give you access to the complete manual.
index 732e12b..3b29d1b 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.34.
-.TH TEXINDEX "1" "December 2004" "texindex 4.8" "User Commands"
+.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by help2man 1.36.
+.TH TEXINDEX "1" "September 2008" "texindex 4.13" "User Commands"
 .SH NAME
 texindex \- sort Texinfo index files
 .SH SYNOPSIS
@@ -13,12 +13,6 @@ Usually FILE... is specified as `foo.??' for a document `foo.texi'.
 \fB\-h\fR, \fB\-\-help\fR
 display this help and exit
 .TP
-\fB\-k\fR, \fB\-\-keep\fR
-keep temporary files around after processing
-.TP
-\fB\-\-no\-keep\fR
-do not keep temporary files around after processing (default)
-.TP
 \fB\-o\fR, \fB\-\-output\fR FILE
 send output to FILE
 .TP
@@ -29,10 +23,11 @@ Email bug reports to bug\-texinfo@gnu.org,
 general questions and discussion to help\-texinfo@gnu.org.
 Texinfo home page: http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/
 .SH COPYRIGHT
-Copyright \(co 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-There is NO warranty.  You may redistribute this software
-under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
-For more information about these matters, see the files named COPYING.
+Copyright \(co 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
+.br
+This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
+There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.
 .SH "SEE ALSO"
 The full documentation for
 .B texindex
index 3f8a2b2..3bdb08a 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 .\" texinfo(5)
-.\" $Id: texinfo.5,v 1.2 2004/04/11 17:56:45 karl Exp $
+.\" $Id: texinfo.5,v 1.3 2005/01/20 22:38:32 karl Exp $
 .\"
 .\" Copyright (C) 1998, 1999, 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 .\"
 .\" versions, except that this permission notice may be stated in a
 .\" translation approved by the Foundation.
 .\"
+.de EX
+.nf
+.ft CW
+.in +5
+..
+.de EE
+.in -5
+.ft R
+.fi
+..
 .TH TEXINFO 5 "GNU Texinfo" "FSF"
 .SH NAME
 texinfo \- software documentation system
@@ -28,13 +38,13 @@ designed for writing software manuals.
 For a full description of the Texinfo language and associated tools,
 please see the Texinfo manual (written in Texinfo itself).  Most likely,
 running this command from your shell:
-.RS
-.I info texinfo
-.RE
+.EX
+info texinfo
+.EE
 or this key sequence from inside Emacs:
-.RS
-.I M-x info RET m texinfo RET
-.RE
+.EX
+M-x info RET m texinfo RET
+.EE
 will get you there.
 .SH AVAILABILITY
 ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/texinfo/
diff --git a/contrib/texinfo/doc/texinfo.tex b/contrib/texinfo/doc/texinfo.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..bac0726
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,8997 @@
+% texinfo.tex -- TeX macros to handle Texinfo files.
+%
+% Load plain if necessary, i.e., if running under initex.
+\expandafter\ifx\csname fmtname\endcsname\relax\input plain\fi
+%
+\def\texinfoversion{2008-04-18.10}
+%
+% Copyright (C) 1985, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995,
+% 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006,
+% 2007, 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+%
+% This texinfo.tex file is free software: you can redistribute it and/or
+% modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
+% published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the
+% License, or (at your option) any later version.
+%
+% This texinfo.tex file is distributed in the hope that it will be
+% useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty
+% of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
+% General Public License for more details.
+%
+% You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+% along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
+%
+% As a special exception, when this file is read by TeX when processing
+% a Texinfo source document, you may use the result without
+% restriction.  (This has been our intent since Texinfo was invented.)
+%
+% Please try the latest version of texinfo.tex before submitting bug
+% reports; you can get the latest version from:
+%   http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/ (the Texinfo home page), or
+%   ftp://tug.org/tex/texinfo.tex
+%     (and all CTAN mirrors, see http://www.ctan.org).
+% The texinfo.tex in any given distribution could well be out
+% of date, so if that's what you're using, please check.
+%
+% Send bug reports to bug-texinfo@gnu.org.  Please include including a
+% complete document in each bug report with which we can reproduce the
+% problem.  Patches are, of course, greatly appreciated.
+%
+% To process a Texinfo manual with TeX, it's most reliable to use the
+% texi2dvi shell script that comes with the distribution.  For a simple
+% manual foo.texi, however, you can get away with this:
+%   tex foo.texi
+%   texindex foo.??
+%   tex foo.texi
+%   tex foo.texi
+%   dvips foo.dvi -o  # or whatever; this makes foo.ps.
+% The extra TeX runs get the cross-reference information correct.
+% Sometimes one run after texindex suffices, and sometimes you need more
+% than two; texi2dvi does it as many times as necessary.
+%
+% It is possible to adapt texinfo.tex for other languages, to some
+% extent.  You can get the existing language-specific files from the
+% full Texinfo distribution.
+%
+% The GNU Texinfo home page is http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo.
+
+
+\message{Loading texinfo [version \texinfoversion]:}
+
+% If in a .fmt file, print the version number
+% and turn on active characters that we couldn't do earlier because
+% they might have appeared in the input file name.
+\everyjob{\message{[Texinfo version \texinfoversion]}%
+  \catcode`+=\active \catcode`\_=\active}
+
+
+\chardef\other=12
+
+% We never want plain's \outer definition of \+ in Texinfo.
+% For @tex, we can use \tabalign.
+\let\+ = \relax
+
+% Save some plain tex macros whose names we will redefine.
+\let\ptexb=\b
+\let\ptexbullet=\bullet
+\let\ptexc=\c
+\let\ptexcomma=\,
+\let\ptexdot=\.
+\let\ptexdots=\dots
+\let\ptexend=\end
+\let\ptexequiv=\equiv
+\let\ptexexclam=\!
+\let\ptexfootnote=\footnote
+\let\ptexgtr=>
+\let\ptexhat=^
+\let\ptexi=\i
+\let\ptexindent=\indent
+\let\ptexinsert=\insert
+\let\ptexlbrace=\{
+\let\ptexless=<
+\let\ptexnewwrite\newwrite
+\let\ptexnoindent=\noindent
+\let\ptexplus=+
+\let\ptexrbrace=\}
+\let\ptexslash=\/
+\let\ptexstar=\*
+\let\ptext=\t
+\let\ptextop=\top
+
+% If this character appears in an error message or help string, it
+% starts a new line in the output.
+\newlinechar = `^^J
+
+% Use TeX 3.0's \inputlineno to get the line number, for better error
+% messages, but if we're using an old version of TeX, don't do anything.
+%
+\ifx\inputlineno\thisisundefined
+  \let\linenumber = \empty % Pre-3.0.
+\else
+  \def\linenumber{l.\the\inputlineno:\space}
+\fi
+
+% Set up fixed words for English if not already set.
+\ifx\putwordAppendix\undefined  \gdef\putwordAppendix{Appendix}\fi
+\ifx\putwordChapter\undefined   \gdef\putwordChapter{Chapter}\fi
+\ifx\putwordfile\undefined      \gdef\putwordfile{file}\fi
+\ifx\putwordin\undefined        \gdef\putwordin{in}\fi
+\ifx\putwordIndexIsEmpty\undefined     \gdef\putwordIndexIsEmpty{(Index is empty)}\fi
+\ifx\putwordIndexNonexistent\undefined \gdef\putwordIndexNonexistent{(Index is nonexistent)}\fi
+\ifx\putwordInfo\undefined      \gdef\putwordInfo{Info}\fi
+\ifx\putwordInstanceVariableof\undefined \gdef\putwordInstanceVariableof{Instance Variable of}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMethodon\undefined  \gdef\putwordMethodon{Method on}\fi
+\ifx\putwordNoTitle\undefined   \gdef\putwordNoTitle{No Title}\fi
+\ifx\putwordof\undefined        \gdef\putwordof{of}\fi
+\ifx\putwordon\undefined        \gdef\putwordon{on}\fi
+\ifx\putwordpage\undefined      \gdef\putwordpage{page}\fi
+\ifx\putwordsection\undefined   \gdef\putwordsection{section}\fi
+\ifx\putwordSection\undefined   \gdef\putwordSection{Section}\fi
+\ifx\putwordsee\undefined       \gdef\putwordsee{see}\fi
+\ifx\putwordSee\undefined       \gdef\putwordSee{See}\fi
+\ifx\putwordShortTOC\undefined  \gdef\putwordShortTOC{Short Contents}\fi
+\ifx\putwordTOC\undefined       \gdef\putwordTOC{Table of Contents}\fi
+%
+\ifx\putwordMJan\undefined \gdef\putwordMJan{January}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMFeb\undefined \gdef\putwordMFeb{February}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMMar\undefined \gdef\putwordMMar{March}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMApr\undefined \gdef\putwordMApr{April}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMMay\undefined \gdef\putwordMMay{May}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMJun\undefined \gdef\putwordMJun{June}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMJul\undefined \gdef\putwordMJul{July}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMAug\undefined \gdef\putwordMAug{August}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMSep\undefined \gdef\putwordMSep{September}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMOct\undefined \gdef\putwordMOct{October}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMNov\undefined \gdef\putwordMNov{November}\fi
+\ifx\putwordMDec\undefined \gdef\putwordMDec{December}\fi
+%
+\ifx\putwordDefmac\undefined    \gdef\putwordDefmac{Macro}\fi
+\ifx\putwordDefspec\undefined   \gdef\putwordDefspec{Special Form}\fi
+\ifx\putwordDefvar\undefined    \gdef\putwordDefvar{Variable}\fi
+\ifx\putwordDefopt\undefined    \gdef\putwordDefopt{User Option}\fi
+\ifx\putwordDeffunc\undefined   \gdef\putwordDeffunc{Function}\fi
+
+% Since the category of space is not known, we have to be careful.
+\chardef\spacecat = 10
+\def\spaceisspace{\catcode`\ =\spacecat}
+
+% sometimes characters are active, so we need control sequences.
+\chardef\colonChar = `\:
+\chardef\commaChar = `\,
+\chardef\dashChar  = `\-
+\chardef\dotChar   = `\.
+\chardef\exclamChar= `\!
+\chardef\lquoteChar= `\`
+\chardef\questChar = `\?
+\chardef\rquoteChar= `\'
+\chardef\semiChar  = `\;
+\chardef\underChar = `\_
+
+% Ignore a token.
+%
+\def\gobble#1{}
+
+% The following is used inside several \edef's.
+\def\makecsname#1{\expandafter\noexpand\csname#1\endcsname}
+
+% Hyphenation fixes.
+\hyphenation{
+  Flor-i-da Ghost-script Ghost-view Mac-OS Post-Script
+  ap-pen-dix bit-map bit-maps
+  data-base data-bases eshell fall-ing half-way long-est man-u-script
+  man-u-scripts mini-buf-fer mini-buf-fers over-view par-a-digm
+  par-a-digms rath-er rec-tan-gu-lar ro-bot-ics se-vere-ly set-up spa-ces
+  spell-ing spell-ings
+  stand-alone strong-est time-stamp time-stamps which-ever white-space
+  wide-spread wrap-around
+}
+
+% Margin to add to right of even pages, to left of odd pages.
+\newdimen\bindingoffset
+\newdimen\normaloffset
+\newdimen\pagewidth \newdimen\pageheight
+
+% For a final copy, take out the rectangles
+% that mark overfull boxes (in case you have decided
+% that the text looks ok even though it passes the margin).
+%
+\def\finalout{\overfullrule=0pt}
+
+% @| inserts a changebar to the left of the current line.  It should
+% surround any changed text.  This approach does *not* work if the
+% change spans more than two lines of output.  To handle that, we would
+% have adopt a much more difficult approach (putting marks into the main
+% vertical list for the beginning and end of each change).
+%
+\def\|{%
+  % \vadjust can only be used in horizontal mode.
+  \leavevmode
+  %
+  % Append this vertical mode material after the current line in the output.
+  \vadjust{%
+    % We want to insert a rule with the height and depth of the current
+    % leading; that is exactly what \strutbox is supposed to record.
+    \vskip-\baselineskip
+    %
+    % \vadjust-items are inserted at the left edge of the type.  So
+    % the \llap here moves out into the left-hand margin.
+    \llap{%
+      %
+      % For a thicker or thinner bar, change the `1pt'.
+      \vrule height\baselineskip width1pt
+      %
+      % This is the space between the bar and the text.
+      \hskip 12pt
+    }%
+  }%
+}
+
+% Sometimes it is convenient to have everything in the transcript file
+% and nothing on the terminal.  We don't just call \tracingall here,
+% since that produces some useless output on the terminal.  We also make
+% some effort to order the tracing commands to reduce output in the log
+% file; cf. trace.sty in LaTeX.
+%
+\def\gloggingall{\begingroup \globaldefs = 1 \loggingall \endgroup}%
+\def\loggingall{%
+  \tracingstats2
+  \tracingpages1
+  \tracinglostchars2  % 2 gives us more in etex
+  \tracingparagraphs1
+  \tracingoutput1
+  \tracingmacros2
+  \tracingrestores1
+  \showboxbreadth\maxdimen \showboxdepth\maxdimen
+  \ifx\eTeXversion\undefined\else % etex gives us more logging
+    \tracingscantokens1
+    \tracingifs1
+    \tracinggroups1
+    \tracingnesting2
+    \tracingassigns1
+  \fi
+  \tracingcommands3  % 3 gives us more in etex
+  \errorcontextlines16
+}%
+
+% add check for \lastpenalty to plain's definitions.  If the last thing
+% we did was a \nobreak, we don't want to insert more space.
+%
+\def\smallbreak{\ifnum\lastpenalty<10000\par\ifdim\lastskip<\smallskipamount
+  \removelastskip\penalty-50\smallskip\fi\fi}
+\def\medbreak{\ifnum\lastpenalty<10000\par\ifdim\lastskip<\medskipamount
+  \removelastskip\penalty-100\medskip\fi\fi}
+\def\bigbreak{\ifnum\lastpenalty<10000\par\ifdim\lastskip<\bigskipamount
+  \removelastskip\penalty-200\bigskip\fi\fi}
+
+% For @cropmarks command.
+% Do @cropmarks to get crop marks.
+%
+\newif\ifcropmarks
+\let\cropmarks = \cropmarkstrue
+%
+% Dimensions to add cropmarks at corners.
+% Added by P. A. MacKay, 12 Nov. 1986
+%
+\newdimen\outerhsize \newdimen\outervsize % set by the paper size routines
+\newdimen\cornerlong  \cornerlong=1pc
+\newdimen\cornerthick \cornerthick=.3pt
+\newdimen\topandbottommargin \topandbottommargin=.75in
+
+% Output a mark which sets \thischapter, \thissection and \thiscolor.
+% We dump everything together because we only have one kind of mark.
+% This works because we only use \botmark / \topmark, not \firstmark.
+%
+% A mark contains a subexpression of the \ifcase ... \fi construct.
+% \get*marks macros below extract the needed part using \ifcase.
+%
+% Another complication is to let the user choose whether \thischapter
+% (\thissection) refers to the chapter (section) in effect at the top
+% of a page, or that at the bottom of a page.  The solution is
+% described on page 260 of The TeXbook.  It involves outputting two
+% marks for the sectioning macros, one before the section break, and
+% one after.  I won't pretend I can describe this better than DEK...
+\def\domark{%
+  \toks0=\expandafter{\lastchapterdefs}%
+  \toks2=\expandafter{\lastsectiondefs}%
+  \toks4=\expandafter{\prevchapterdefs}%
+  \toks6=\expandafter{\prevsectiondefs}%
+  \toks8=\expandafter{\lastcolordefs}%
+  \mark{%
+                   \the\toks0 \the\toks2
+      \noexpand\or \the\toks4 \the\toks6
+    \noexpand\else \the\toks8
+  }%
+}
+% \topmark doesn't work for the very first chapter (after the title
+% page or the contents), so we use \firstmark there -- this gets us
+% the mark with the chapter defs, unless the user sneaks in, e.g.,
+% @setcolor (or @url, or @link, etc.) between @contents and the very
+% first @chapter.
+\def\gettopheadingmarks{%
+  \ifcase0\topmark\fi
+  \ifx\thischapter\empty \ifcase0\firstmark\fi \fi
+}
+\def\getbottomheadingmarks{\ifcase1\botmark\fi}
+\def\getcolormarks{\ifcase2\topmark\fi}
+
+% Avoid "undefined control sequence" errors.
+\def\lastchapterdefs{}
+\def\lastsectiondefs{}
+\def\prevchapterdefs{}
+\def\prevsectiondefs{}
+\def\lastcolordefs{}
+
+% Main output routine.
+\chardef\PAGE = 255
+\output = {\onepageout{\pagecontents\PAGE}}
+
+\newbox\headlinebox
+\newbox\footlinebox
+
+% \onepageout takes a vbox as an argument.  Note that \pagecontents
+% does insertions, but you have to call it yourself.
+\def\onepageout#1{%
+  \ifcropmarks \hoffset=0pt \else \hoffset=\normaloffset \fi
+  %
+  \ifodd\pageno  \advance\hoffset by \bindingoffset
+  \else \advance\hoffset by -\bindingoffset\fi
+  %
+  % Do this outside of the \shipout so @code etc. will be expanded in
+  % the headline as they should be, not taken literally (outputting ''code).
+  \ifodd\pageno \getoddheadingmarks \else \getevenheadingmarks \fi
+  \setbox\headlinebox = \vbox{\let\hsize=\pagewidth \makeheadline}%
+  \ifodd\pageno \getoddfootingmarks \else \getevenfootingmarks \fi
+  \setbox\footlinebox = \vbox{\let\hsize=\pagewidth \makefootline}%
+  %
+  {%
+    % Have to do this stuff outside the \shipout because we want it to
+    % take effect in \write's, yet the group defined by the \vbox ends
+    % before the \shipout runs.
+    %
+    \indexdummies         % don't expand commands in the output.
+    \normalturnoffactive  % \ in index entries must not stay \, e.g., if
+               % the page break happens to be in the middle of an example.
+               % We don't want .vr (or whatever) entries like this:
+               % \entry{{\tt \indexbackslash }acronym}{32}{\code {\acronym}}
+               % "\acronym" won't work when it's read back in;
+               % it needs to be 
+               % {\code {{\tt \backslashcurfont }acronym}
+    \shipout\vbox{%
+      % Do this early so pdf references go to the beginning of the page.
+      \ifpdfmakepagedest \pdfdest name{\the\pageno} xyz\fi
+      %
+      \ifcropmarks \vbox to \outervsize\bgroup
+        \hsize = \outerhsize
+        \vskip-\topandbottommargin
+        \vtop to0pt{%
+          \line{\ewtop\hfil\ewtop}%
+          \nointerlineskip
+          \line{%
+            \vbox{\moveleft\cornerthick\nstop}%
+            \hfill
+            \vbox{\moveright\cornerthick\nstop}%
+          }%
+          \vss}%
+        \vskip\topandbottommargin
+        \line\bgroup
+          \hfil % center the page within the outer (page) hsize.
+          \ifodd\pageno\hskip\bindingoffset\fi
+          \vbox\bgroup
+      \fi
+      %
+      \unvbox\headlinebox
+      \pagebody{#1}%
+      \ifdim\ht\footlinebox > 0pt
+        % Only leave this space if the footline is nonempty.
+        % (We lessened \vsize for it in \oddfootingyyy.)
+        % The \baselineskip=24pt in plain's \makefootline has no effect.
+        \vskip 24pt
+        \unvbox\footlinebox
+      \fi
+      %
+      \ifcropmarks
+          \egroup % end of \vbox\bgroup
+        \hfil\egroup % end of (centering) \line\bgroup
+        \vskip\topandbottommargin plus1fill minus1fill
+        \boxmaxdepth = \cornerthick
+        \vbox to0pt{\vss
+          \line{%
+            \vbox{\moveleft\cornerthick\nsbot}%
+            \hfill
+            \vbox{\moveright\cornerthick\nsbot}%
+          }%
+          \nointerlineskip
+          \line{\ewbot\hfil\ewbot}%
+        }%
+      \egroup % \vbox from first cropmarks clause
+      \fi
+    }% end of \shipout\vbox
+  }% end of group with \indexdummies
+  \advancepageno
+  \ifnum\outputpenalty>-20000 \else\dosupereject\fi
+}
+
+\newinsert\margin \dimen\margin=\maxdimen
+
+\def\pagebody#1{\vbox to\pageheight{\boxmaxdepth=\maxdepth #1}}
+{\catcode`\@ =11
+\gdef\pagecontents#1{\ifvoid\topins\else\unvbox\topins\fi
+% marginal hacks, juha@viisa.uucp (Juha Takala)
+\ifvoid\margin\else % marginal info is present
+  \rlap{\kern\hsize\vbox to\z@{\kern1pt\box\margin \vss}}\fi
+\dimen@=\dp#1\relax \unvbox#1\relax
+\ifvoid\footins\else\vskip\skip\footins\footnoterule \unvbox\footins\fi
+\ifr@ggedbottom \kern-\dimen@ \vfil \fi}
+}
+
+% Here are the rules for the cropmarks.  Note that they are
+% offset so that the space between them is truly \outerhsize or \outervsize
+% (P. A. MacKay, 12 November, 1986)
+%
+\def\ewtop{\vrule height\cornerthick depth0pt width\cornerlong}
+\def\nstop{\vbox
+  {\hrule height\cornerthick depth\cornerlong width\cornerthick}}
+\def\ewbot{\vrule height0pt depth\cornerthick width\cornerlong}
+\def\nsbot{\vbox
+  {\hrule height\cornerlong depth\cornerthick width\cornerthick}}
+
+% Parse an argument, then pass it to #1.  The argument is the rest of
+% the input line (except we remove a trailing comment).  #1 should be a
+% macro which expects an ordinary undelimited TeX argument.
+%
+\def\parsearg{\parseargusing{}}
+\def\parseargusing#1#2{%
+  \def\argtorun{#2}%
+  \begingroup
+    \obeylines
+    \spaceisspace
+    #1%
+    \parseargline\empty% Insert the \empty token, see \finishparsearg below.
+}
+
+{\obeylines %
+  \gdef\parseargline#1^^M{%
+    \endgroup % End of the group started in \parsearg.
+    \argremovecomment #1\comment\ArgTerm%
+  }%
+}
+
+% First remove any @comment, then any @c comment.
+\def\argremovecomment#1\comment#2\ArgTerm{\argremovec #1\c\ArgTerm}
+\def\argremovec#1\c#2\ArgTerm{\argcheckspaces#1\^^M\ArgTerm}
+
+% Each occurrence of `\^^M' or `<space>\^^M' is replaced by a single space.
+%
+% \argremovec might leave us with trailing space, e.g.,
+%    @end itemize  @c foo
+% This space token undergoes the same procedure and is eventually removed
+% by \finishparsearg.
+%
+\def\argcheckspaces#1\^^M{\argcheckspacesX#1\^^M \^^M}
+\def\argcheckspacesX#1 \^^M{\argcheckspacesY#1\^^M}
+\def\argcheckspacesY#1\^^M#2\^^M#3\ArgTerm{%
+  \def\temp{#3}%
+  \ifx\temp\empty
+    % Do not use \next, perhaps the caller of \parsearg uses it; reuse \temp:
+    \let\temp\finishparsearg
+  \else
+    \let\temp\argcheckspaces
+  \fi
+  % Put the space token in:
+  \temp#1 #3\ArgTerm
+}
+
+% If a _delimited_ argument is enclosed in braces, they get stripped; so
+% to get _exactly_ the rest of the line, we had to prevent such situation.
+% We prepended an \empty token at the very beginning and we expand it now,
+% just before passing the control to \argtorun.
+% (Similarly, we have to think about #3 of \argcheckspacesY above: it is
+% either the null string, or it ends with \^^M---thus there is no danger
+% that a pair of braces would be stripped.
+%
+% But first, we have to remove the trailing space token.
+%
+\def\finishparsearg#1 \ArgTerm{\expandafter\argtorun\expandafter{#1}}
+
+% \parseargdef\foo{...}
+%      is roughly equivalent to
+% \def\foo{\parsearg\Xfoo}
+% \def\Xfoo#1{...}
+%
+% Actually, I use \csname\string\foo\endcsname, ie. \\foo, as it is my
+% favourite TeX trick.  --kasal, 16nov03
+
+\def\parseargdef#1{%
+  \expandafter \doparseargdef \csname\string#1\endcsname #1%
+}
+\def\doparseargdef#1#2{%
+  \def#2{\parsearg#1}%
+  \def#1##1%
+}
+
+% Several utility definitions with active space:
+{
+  \obeyspaces
+  \gdef\obeyedspace{ }
+
+  % Make each space character in the input produce a normal interword
+  % space in the output.  Don't allow a line break at this space, as this
+  % is used only in environments like @example, where each line of input
+  % should produce a line of output anyway.
+  %
+  \gdef\sepspaces{\obeyspaces\let =\tie}
+
+  % If an index command is used in an @example environment, any spaces
+  % therein should become regular spaces in the raw index file, not the
+  % expansion of \tie (\leavevmode \penalty \@M \ ).
+  \gdef\unsepspaces{\let =\space}
+}
+
+
+\def\flushcr{\ifx\par\lisppar \def\next##1{}\else \let\next=\relax \fi \next}
+
+% Define the framework for environments in texinfo.tex.  It's used like this:
+%
+%   \envdef\foo{...}
+%   \def\Efoo{...}
+%
+% It's the responsibility of \envdef to insert \begingroup before the
+% actual body; @end closes the group after calling \Efoo.  \envdef also
+% defines \thisenv, so the current environment is known; @end checks
+% whether the environment name matches.  The \checkenv macro can also be
+% used to check whether the current environment is the one expected.
+%
+% Non-false conditionals (@iftex, @ifset) don't fit into this, so they
+% are not treated as environments; they don't open a group.  (The
+% implementation of @end takes care not to call \endgroup in this
+% special case.)
+
+
+% At run-time, environments start with this:
+\def\startenvironment#1{\begingroup\def\thisenv{#1}}
+% initialize
+\let\thisenv\empty
+
+% ... but they get defined via ``\envdef\foo{...}'':
+\long\def\envdef#1#2{\def#1{\startenvironment#1#2}}
+\def\envparseargdef#1#2{\parseargdef#1{\startenvironment#1#2}}
+
+% Check whether we're in the right environment:
+\def\checkenv#1{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\thisenv\temp
+  \else
+    \badenverr
+  \fi
+}
+
+% Environment mismatch, #1 expected:
+\def\badenverr{%
+  \errhelp = \EMsimple
+  \errmessage{This command can appear only \inenvironment\temp,
+    not \inenvironment\thisenv}%
+}
+\def\inenvironment#1{%
+  \ifx#1\empty
+    out of any environment%
+  \else
+    in environment \expandafter\string#1%
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @end foo executes the definition of \Efoo.
+% But first, it executes a specialized version of \checkenv
+%
+\parseargdef\end{%
+  \if 1\csname iscond.#1\endcsname
+  \else
+    % The general wording of \badenverr may not be ideal, but... --kasal, 06nov03
+    \expandafter\checkenv\csname#1\endcsname
+    \csname E#1\endcsname
+    \endgroup
+  \fi
+}
+
+\newhelp\EMsimple{Press RETURN to continue.}
+
+
+%% Simple single-character @ commands
+
+% @@ prints an @
+% Kludge this until the fonts are right (grr).
+\def\@{{\tt\char64}}
+
+% This is turned off because it was never documented
+% and you can use @w{...} around a quote to suppress ligatures.
+%% Define @` and @' to be the same as ` and '
+%% but suppressing ligatures.
+%\def\`{{`}}
+%\def\'{{'}}
+
+% Used to generate quoted braces.
+\def\mylbrace {{\tt\char123}}
+\def\myrbrace {{\tt\char125}}
+\let\{=\mylbrace
+\let\}=\myrbrace
+\begingroup
+  % Definitions to produce \{ and \} commands for indices,
+  % and @{ and @} for the aux/toc files.
+  \catcode`\{ = \other \catcode`\} = \other
+  \catcode`\[ = 1 \catcode`\] = 2
+  \catcode`\! = 0 \catcode`\\ = \other
+  !gdef!lbracecmd[\{]%
+  !gdef!rbracecmd[\}]%
+  !gdef!lbraceatcmd[@{]%
+  !gdef!rbraceatcmd[@}]%
+!endgroup
+
+% @comma{} to avoid , parsing problems.
+\let\comma = ,
+
+% Accents: @, @dotaccent @ringaccent @ubaraccent @udotaccent
+% Others are defined by plain TeX: @` @' @" @^ @~ @= @u @v @H.
+\let\, = \c
+\let\dotaccent = \.
+\def\ringaccent#1{{\accent23 #1}}
+\let\tieaccent = \t
+\let\ubaraccent = \b
+\let\udotaccent = \d
+
+% Other special characters: @questiondown @exclamdown @ordf @ordm
+% Plain TeX defines: @AA @AE @O @OE @L (plus lowercase versions) @ss.
+\def\questiondown{?`}
+\def\exclamdown{!`}
+\def\ordf{\leavevmode\raise1ex\hbox{\selectfonts\lllsize \underbar{a}}}
+\def\ordm{\leavevmode\raise1ex\hbox{\selectfonts\lllsize \underbar{o}}}
+
+% Dotless i and dotless j, used for accents.
+\def\imacro{i}
+\def\jmacro{j}
+\def\dotless#1{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\imacro \ifmmode\imath \else\ptexi \fi
+  \else\ifx\temp\jmacro \ifmmode\jmath \else\j \fi
+  \else \errmessage{@dotless can be used only with i or j}%
+  \fi\fi
+}
+
+% The \TeX{} logo, as in plain, but resetting the spacing so that a
+% period following counts as ending a sentence.  (Idea found in latex.)
+%
+\edef\TeX{\TeX \spacefactor=1000 }
+
+% @LaTeX{} logo.  Not quite the same results as the definition in
+% latex.ltx, since we use a different font for the raised A; it's most
+% convenient for us to use an explicitly smaller font, rather than using
+% the \scriptstyle font (since we don't reset \scriptstyle and
+% \scriptscriptstyle).
+%
+\def\LaTeX{%
+  L\kern-.36em
+  {\setbox0=\hbox{T}%
+   \vbox to \ht0{\hbox{\selectfonts\lllsize A}\vss}}%
+  \kern-.15em
+  \TeX
+}
+
+% Be sure we're in horizontal mode when doing a tie, since we make space
+% equivalent to this in @example-like environments. Otherwise, a space
+% at the beginning of a line will start with \penalty -- and
+% since \penalty is valid in vertical mode, we'd end up putting the
+% penalty on the vertical list instead of in the new paragraph.
+{\catcode`@ = 11
+ % Avoid using \@M directly, because that causes trouble
+ % if the definition is written into an index file.
+ \global\let\tiepenalty = \@M
+ \gdef\tie{\leavevmode\penalty\tiepenalty\ }
+}
+
+% @: forces normal size whitespace following.
+\def\:{\spacefactor=1000 }
+
+% @* forces a line break.
+\def\*{\hfil\break\hbox{}\ignorespaces}
+
+% @/ allows a line break.
+\let\/=\allowbreak
+
+% @. is an end-of-sentence period.
+\def\.{.\spacefactor=\endofsentencespacefactor\space}
+
+% @! is an end-of-sentence bang.
+\def\!{!\spacefactor=\endofsentencespacefactor\space}
+
+% @? is an end-of-sentence query.
+\def\?{?\spacefactor=\endofsentencespacefactor\space}
+
+% @frenchspacing on|off  says whether to put extra space after punctuation.
+% 
+\def\onword{on}
+\def\offword{off}
+%
+\parseargdef\frenchspacing{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\onword \plainfrenchspacing
+  \else\ifx\temp\offword \plainnonfrenchspacing
+  \else
+    \errhelp = \EMsimple
+    \errmessage{Unknown @frenchspacing option `\temp', must be on/off}%
+  \fi\fi
+}
+
+% @w prevents a word break.  Without the \leavevmode, @w at the
+% beginning of a paragraph, when TeX is still in vertical mode, would
+% produce a whole line of output instead of starting the paragraph.
+\def\w#1{\leavevmode\hbox{#1}}
+
+% @group ... @end group forces ... to be all on one page, by enclosing
+% it in a TeX vbox.  We use \vtop instead of \vbox to construct the box
+% to keep its height that of a normal line.  According to the rules for
+% \topskip (p.114 of the TeXbook), the glue inserted is
+% max (\topskip - \ht (first item), 0).  If that height is large,
+% therefore, no glue is inserted, and the space between the headline and
+% the text is small, which looks bad.
+%
+% Another complication is that the group might be very large.  This can
+% cause the glue on the previous page to be unduly stretched, because it
+% does not have much material.  In this case, it's better to add an
+% explicit \vfill so that the extra space is at the bottom.  The
+% threshold for doing this is if the group is more than \vfilllimit
+% percent of a page (\vfilllimit can be changed inside of @tex).
+%
+\newbox\groupbox
+\def\vfilllimit{0.7}
+%
+\envdef\group{%
+  \ifnum\catcode`\^^M=\active \else
+    \errhelp = \groupinvalidhelp
+    \errmessage{@group invalid in context where filling is enabled}%
+  \fi
+  \startsavinginserts
+  %
+  \setbox\groupbox = \vtop\bgroup
+    % Do @comment since we are called inside an environment such as
+    % @example, where each end-of-line in the input causes an
+    % end-of-line in the output.  We don't want the end-of-line after
+    % the `@group' to put extra space in the output.  Since @group
+    % should appear on a line by itself (according to the Texinfo
+    % manual), we don't worry about eating any user text.
+    \comment
+}
+%
+% The \vtop produces a box with normal height and large depth; thus, TeX puts
+% \baselineskip glue before it, and (when the next line of text is done)
+% \lineskip glue after it.  Thus, space below is not quite equal to space
+% above.  But it's pretty close.
+\def\Egroup{%
+    % To get correct interline space between the last line of the group
+    % and the first line afterwards, we have to propagate \prevdepth.
+    \endgraf % Not \par, as it may have been set to \lisppar.
+    \global\dimen1 = \prevdepth
+  \egroup           % End the \vtop.
+  % \dimen0 is the vertical size of the group's box.
+  \dimen0 = \ht\groupbox  \advance\dimen0 by \dp\groupbox
+  % \dimen2 is how much space is left on the page (more or less).
+  \dimen2 = \pageheight   \advance\dimen2 by -\pagetotal
+  % if the group doesn't fit on the current page, and it's a big big
+  % group, force a page break.
+  \ifdim \dimen0 > \dimen2
+    \ifdim \pagetotal < \vfilllimit\pageheight
+      \page
+    \fi
+  \fi
+  \box\groupbox
+  \prevdepth = \dimen1
+  \checkinserts
+}
+%
+% TeX puts in an \escapechar (i.e., `@') at the beginning of the help
+% message, so this ends up printing `@group can only ...'.
+%
+\newhelp\groupinvalidhelp{%
+group can only be used in environments such as @example,^^J%
+where each line of input produces a line of output.}
+
+% @need space-in-mils
+% forces a page break if there is not space-in-mils remaining.
+
+\newdimen\mil  \mil=0.001in
+
+% Old definition--didn't work.
+%\parseargdef\need{\par %
+%% This method tries to make TeX break the page naturally
+%% if the depth of the box does not fit.
+%{\baselineskip=0pt%
+%\vtop to #1\mil{\vfil}\kern -#1\mil\nobreak
+%\prevdepth=-1000pt
+%}}
+
+\parseargdef\need{%
+  % Ensure vertical mode, so we don't make a big box in the middle of a
+  % paragraph.
+  \par
+  %
+  % If the @need value is less than one line space, it's useless.
+  \dimen0 = #1\mil
+  \dimen2 = \ht\strutbox
+  \advance\dimen2 by \dp\strutbox
+  \ifdim\dimen0 > \dimen2
+    %
+    % Do a \strut just to make the height of this box be normal, so the
+    % normal leading is inserted relative to the preceding line.
+    % And a page break here is fine.
+    \vtop to #1\mil{\strut\vfil}%
+    %
+    % TeX does not even consider page breaks if a penalty added to the
+    % main vertical list is 10000 or more.  But in order to see if the
+    % empty box we just added fits on the page, we must make it consider
+    % page breaks.  On the other hand, we don't want to actually break the
+    % page after the empty box.  So we use a penalty of 9999.
+    %
+    % There is an extremely small chance that TeX will actually break the
+    % page at this \penalty, if there are no other feasible breakpoints in
+    % sight.  (If the user is using lots of big @group commands, which
+    % almost-but-not-quite fill up a page, TeX will have a hard time doing
+    % good page breaking, for example.)  However, I could not construct an
+    % example where a page broke at this \penalty; if it happens in a real
+    % document, then we can reconsider our strategy.
+    \penalty9999
+    %
+    % Back up by the size of the box, whether we did a page break or not.
+    \kern -#1\mil
+    %
+    % Do not allow a page break right after this kern.
+    \nobreak
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @br   forces paragraph break (and is undocumented).
+
+\let\br = \par
+
+% @page forces the start of a new page.
+%
+\def\page{\par\vfill\supereject}
+
+% @exdent text....
+% outputs text on separate line in roman font, starting at standard page margin
+
+% This records the amount of indent in the innermost environment.
+% That's how much \exdent should take out.
+\newskip\exdentamount
+
+% This defn is used inside fill environments such as @defun.
+\parseargdef\exdent{\hfil\break\hbox{\kern -\exdentamount{\rm#1}}\hfil\break}
+
+% This defn is used inside nofill environments such as @example.
+\parseargdef\nofillexdent{{\advance \leftskip by -\exdentamount
+  \leftline{\hskip\leftskip{\rm#1}}}}
+
+% @inmargin{WHICH}{TEXT} puts TEXT in the WHICH margin next to the current
+% paragraph.  For more general purposes, use the \margin insertion
+% class.  WHICH is `l' or `r'.
+%
+\newskip\inmarginspacing \inmarginspacing=1cm
+\def\strutdepth{\dp\strutbox}
+%
+\def\doinmargin#1#2{\strut\vadjust{%
+  \nobreak
+  \kern-\strutdepth
+  \vtop to \strutdepth{%
+    \baselineskip=\strutdepth
+    \vss
+    % if you have multiple lines of stuff to put here, you'll need to
+    % make the vbox yourself of the appropriate size.
+    \ifx#1l%
+      \llap{\ignorespaces #2\hskip\inmarginspacing}%
+    \else
+      \rlap{\hskip\hsize \hskip\inmarginspacing \ignorespaces #2}%
+    \fi
+    \null
+  }%
+}}
+\def\inleftmargin{\doinmargin l}
+\def\inrightmargin{\doinmargin r}
+%
+% @inmargin{TEXT [, RIGHT-TEXT]}
+% (if RIGHT-TEXT is given, use TEXT for left page, RIGHT-TEXT for right;
+% else use TEXT for both).
+%
+\def\inmargin#1{\parseinmargin #1,,\finish}
+\def\parseinmargin#1,#2,#3\finish{% not perfect, but better than nothing.
+  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}%
+  \ifdim\wd0 > 0pt
+    \def\lefttext{#1}%  have both texts
+    \def\righttext{#2}%
+  \else
+    \def\lefttext{#1}%  have only one text
+    \def\righttext{#1}%
+  \fi
+  %
+  \ifodd\pageno
+    \def\temp{\inrightmargin\righttext}% odd page -> outside is right margin
+  \else
+    \def\temp{\inleftmargin\lefttext}%
+  \fi
+  \temp
+}
+
+% @include FILE -- \input text of FILE.
+%
+\def\include{\parseargusing\filenamecatcodes\includezzz}
+\def\includezzz#1{%
+  \pushthisfilestack
+  \def\thisfile{#1}%
+  {%
+    \makevalueexpandable  % we want to expand any @value in FILE.
+    \turnoffactive        % and allow special characters in the expansion
+    \edef\temp{\noexpand\input #1 }%
+    %
+    % This trickery is to read FILE outside of a group, in case it makes
+    % definitions, etc.
+    \expandafter
+  }\temp
+  \popthisfilestack
+}
+\def\filenamecatcodes{%
+  \catcode`\\=\other
+  \catcode`~=\other
+  \catcode`^=\other
+  \catcode`_=\other
+  \catcode`|=\other
+  \catcode`<=\other
+  \catcode`>=\other
+  \catcode`+=\other
+  \catcode`-=\other
+}
+
+\def\pushthisfilestack{%
+  \expandafter\pushthisfilestackX\popthisfilestack\StackTerm
+}
+\def\pushthisfilestackX{%
+  \expandafter\pushthisfilestackY\thisfile\StackTerm
+}
+\def\pushthisfilestackY #1\StackTerm #2\StackTerm {%
+  \gdef\popthisfilestack{\gdef\thisfile{#1}\gdef\popthisfilestack{#2}}%
+}
+
+\def\popthisfilestack{\errthisfilestackempty}
+\def\errthisfilestackempty{\errmessage{Internal error:
+  the stack of filenames is empty.}}
+
+\def\thisfile{}
+
+% @center line
+% outputs that line, centered.
+%
+\parseargdef\center{%
+  \ifhmode
+    \let\next\centerH
+  \else
+    \let\next\centerV
+  \fi
+  \next{\hfil \ignorespaces#1\unskip \hfil}%
+}
+\def\centerH#1{%
+  {%
+    \hfil\break
+    \advance\hsize by -\leftskip
+    \advance\hsize by -\rightskip
+    \line{#1}%
+    \break
+  }%
+}
+\def\centerV#1{\line{\kern\leftskip #1\kern\rightskip}}
+
+% @sp n   outputs n lines of vertical space
+
+\parseargdef\sp{\vskip #1\baselineskip}
+
+% @comment ...line which is ignored...
+% @c is the same as @comment
+% @ignore ... @end ignore  is another way to write a comment
+
+\def\comment{\begingroup \catcode`\^^M=\other%
+\catcode`\@=\other \catcode`\{=\other \catcode`\}=\other%
+\commentxxx}
+{\catcode`\^^M=\other \gdef\commentxxx#1^^M{\endgroup}}
+
+\let\c=\comment
+
+% @paragraphindent NCHARS
+% We'll use ems for NCHARS, close enough.
+% NCHARS can also be the word `asis' or `none'.
+% We cannot feasibly implement @paragraphindent asis, though.
+%
+\def\asisword{asis} % no translation, these are keywords
+\def\noneword{none}
+%
+\parseargdef\paragraphindent{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\asisword
+  \else
+    \ifx\temp\noneword
+      \defaultparindent = 0pt
+    \else
+      \defaultparindent = #1em
+    \fi
+  \fi
+  \parindent = \defaultparindent
+}
+
+% @exampleindent NCHARS
+% We'll use ems for NCHARS like @paragraphindent.
+% It seems @exampleindent asis isn't necessary, but
+% I preserve it to make it similar to @paragraphindent.
+\parseargdef\exampleindent{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\asisword
+  \else
+    \ifx\temp\noneword
+      \lispnarrowing = 0pt
+    \else
+      \lispnarrowing = #1em
+    \fi
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @firstparagraphindent WORD
+% If WORD is `none', then suppress indentation of the first paragraph
+% after a section heading.  If WORD is `insert', then do indent at such
+% paragraphs.
+%
+% The paragraph indentation is suppressed or not by calling
+% \suppressfirstparagraphindent, which the sectioning commands do.
+% We switch the definition of this back and forth according to WORD.
+% By default, we suppress indentation.
+%
+\def\suppressfirstparagraphindent{\dosuppressfirstparagraphindent}
+\def\insertword{insert}
+%
+\parseargdef\firstparagraphindent{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\noneword
+    \let\suppressfirstparagraphindent = \dosuppressfirstparagraphindent
+  \else\ifx\temp\insertword
+    \let\suppressfirstparagraphindent = \relax
+  \else
+    \errhelp = \EMsimple
+    \errmessage{Unknown @firstparagraphindent option `\temp'}%
+  \fi\fi
+}
+
+% Here is how we actually suppress indentation.  Redefine \everypar to
+% \kern backwards by \parindent, and then reset itself to empty.
+%
+% We also make \indent itself not actually do anything until the next
+% paragraph.
+%
+\gdef\dosuppressfirstparagraphindent{%
+  \gdef\indent{%
+    \restorefirstparagraphindent
+    \indent
+  }%
+  \gdef\noindent{%
+    \restorefirstparagraphindent
+    \noindent
+  }%
+  \global\everypar = {%
+    \kern -\parindent
+    \restorefirstparagraphindent
+  }%
+}
+
+\gdef\restorefirstparagraphindent{%
+  \global \let \indent = \ptexindent
+  \global \let \noindent = \ptexnoindent
+  \global \everypar = {}%
+}
+
+
+% @asis just yields its argument.  Used with @table, for example.
+%
+\def\asis#1{#1}
+
+% @math outputs its argument in math mode.
+%
+% One complication: _ usually means subscripts, but it could also mean
+% an actual _ character, as in @math{@var{some_variable} + 1}.  So make
+% _ active, and distinguish by seeing if the current family is \slfam,
+% which is what @var uses.
+{
+  \catcode`\_ = \active
+  \gdef\mathunderscore{%
+    \catcode`\_=\active
+    \def_{\ifnum\fam=\slfam \_\else\sb\fi}%
+  }
+}
+% Another complication: we want \\ (and @\) to output a \ character.
+% FYI, plain.tex uses \\ as a temporary control sequence (why?), but
+% this is not advertised and we don't care.  Texinfo does not
+% otherwise define @\.
+%
+% The \mathchar is class=0=ordinary, family=7=ttfam, position=5C=\.
+\def\mathbackslash{\ifnum\fam=\ttfam \mathchar"075C \else\backslash \fi}
+%
+\def\math{%
+  \tex
+  \mathunderscore
+  \let\\ = \mathbackslash
+  \mathactive
+  % make the texinfo accent commands work in math mode
+  \let\"=\ddot
+  \let\'=\acute
+  \let\==\bar
+  \let\^=\hat
+  \let\`=\grave
+  \let\u=\breve
+  \let\v=\check
+  \let\~=\tilde
+  \let\dotaccent=\dot
+  $\finishmath
+}
+\def\finishmath#1{#1$\endgroup}  % Close the group opened by \tex.
+
+% Some active characters (such as <) are spaced differently in math.
+% We have to reset their definitions in case the @math was an argument
+% to a command which sets the catcodes (such as @item or @section).
+%
+{
+  \catcode`^ = \active
+  \catcode`< = \active
+  \catcode`> = \active
+  \catcode`+ = \active
+  \gdef\mathactive{%
+    \let^ = \ptexhat
+    \let< = \ptexless
+    \let> = \ptexgtr
+    \let+ = \ptexplus
+  }
+}
+
+% Some math mode symbols.
+\def\bullet{$\ptexbullet$}
+\def\geq{\ifmmode \ge\else $\ge$\fi}
+\def\leq{\ifmmode \le\else $\le$\fi}
+\def\minus{\ifmmode -\else $-$\fi}
+
+% @dots{} outputs an ellipsis using the current font.
+% We do .5em per period so that it has the same spacing in the cm
+% typewriter fonts as three actual period characters; on the other hand,
+% in other typewriter fonts three periods are wider than 1.5em.  So do
+% whichever is larger.
+%
+\def\dots{%
+  \leavevmode
+  \setbox0=\hbox{...}% get width of three periods
+  \ifdim\wd0 > 1.5em
+    \dimen0 = \wd0
+  \else
+    \dimen0 = 1.5em
+  \fi
+  \hbox to \dimen0{%
+    \hskip 0pt plus.25fil
+    .\hskip 0pt plus1fil
+    .\hskip 0pt plus1fil
+    .\hskip 0pt plus.5fil
+  }%
+}
+
+% @enddots{} is an end-of-sentence ellipsis.
+%
+\def\enddots{%
+  \dots
+  \spacefactor=\endofsentencespacefactor
+}
+
+% @comma{} is so commas can be inserted into text without messing up
+% Texinfo's parsing.
+%
+\let\comma = ,
+
+% @refill is a no-op.
+\let\refill=\relax
+
+% If working on a large document in chapters, it is convenient to
+% be able to disable indexing, cross-referencing, and contents, for test runs.
+% This is done with @novalidate (before @setfilename).
+%
+\newif\iflinks \linkstrue % by default we want the aux files.
+\let\novalidate = \linksfalse
+
+% @setfilename is done at the beginning of every texinfo file.
+% So open here the files we need to have open while reading the input.
+% This makes it possible to make a .fmt file for texinfo.
+\def\setfilename{%
+   \fixbackslash  % Turn off hack to swallow `\input texinfo'.
+   \iflinks
+     \tryauxfile
+     % Open the new aux file.  TeX will close it automatically at exit.
+     \immediate\openout\auxfile=\jobname.aux
+   \fi % \openindices needs to do some work in any case.
+   \openindices
+   \let\setfilename=\comment % Ignore extra @setfilename cmds.
+   %
+   % If texinfo.cnf is present on the system, read it.
+   % Useful for site-wide @afourpaper, etc.
+   \openin 1 texinfo.cnf
+   \ifeof 1 \else \input texinfo.cnf \fi
+   \closein 1
+   %
+   \comment % Ignore the actual filename.
+}
+
+% Called from \setfilename.
+%
+\def\openindices{%
+  \newindex{cp}%
+  \newcodeindex{fn}%
+  \newcodeindex{vr}%
+  \newcodeindex{tp}%
+  \newcodeindex{ky}%
+  \newcodeindex{pg}%
+}
+
+% @bye.
+\outer\def\bye{\pagealignmacro\tracingstats=1\ptexend}
+
+
+\message{pdf,}
+% adobe `portable' document format
+\newcount\tempnum
+\newcount\lnkcount
+\newtoks\filename
+\newcount\filenamelength
+\newcount\pgn
+\newtoks\toksA
+\newtoks\toksB
+\newtoks\toksC
+\newtoks\toksD
+\newbox\boxA
+\newcount\countA
+\newif\ifpdf
+\newif\ifpdfmakepagedest
+
+% when pdftex is run in dvi mode, \pdfoutput is defined (so \pdfoutput=1
+% can be set).  So we test for \relax and 0 as well as \undefined,
+% borrowed from ifpdf.sty.
+\ifx\pdfoutput\undefined
+\else
+  \ifx\pdfoutput\relax
+  \else
+    \ifcase\pdfoutput
+    \else
+      \pdftrue
+    \fi
+  \fi
+\fi
+
+% PDF uses PostScript string constants for the names of xref targets,
+% for display in the outlines, and in other places.  Thus, we have to
+% double any backslashes.  Otherwise, a name like "\node" will be
+% interpreted as a newline (\n), followed by o, d, e.  Not good.
+% http://www.ntg.nl/pipermail/ntg-pdftex/2004-July/000654.html
+% (and related messages, the final outcome is that it is up to the TeX
+% user to double the backslashes and otherwise make the string valid, so
+% that's what we do).
+
+% double active backslashes.
+% 
+{\catcode`\@=0 \catcode`\\=\active
+ @gdef@activebackslashdouble{%
+   @catcode`@\=@active
+   @let\=@doublebackslash}
+}
+
+% To handle parens, we must adopt a different approach, since parens are
+% not active characters.  hyperref.dtx (which has the same problem as
+% us) handles it with this amazing macro to replace tokens, with minor
+% changes for Texinfo.  It is included here under the GPL by permission
+% from the author, Heiko Oberdiek.
+% 
+% #1 is the tokens to replace.
+% #2 is the replacement.
+% #3 is the control sequence with the string.
+% 
+\def\HyPsdSubst#1#2#3{%
+  \def\HyPsdReplace##1#1##2\END{%
+    ##1%
+    \ifx\\##2\\%
+    \else
+      #2%
+      \HyReturnAfterFi{%
+        \HyPsdReplace##2\END
+      }%
+    \fi
+  }%
+  \xdef#3{\expandafter\HyPsdReplace#3#1\END}%
+}
+\long\def\HyReturnAfterFi#1\fi{\fi#1}
+
+% #1 is a control sequence in which to do the replacements.
+\def\backslashparens#1{%
+  \xdef#1{#1}% redefine it as its expansion; the definition is simply
+             % \lastnode when called from \setref -> \pdfmkdest.
+  \HyPsdSubst{(}{\realbackslash(}{#1}%
+  \HyPsdSubst{)}{\realbackslash)}{#1}%
+}
+
+\newhelp\nopdfimagehelp{Texinfo supports .png, .jpg, .jpeg, and .pdf images
+with PDF output, and none of those formats could be found.  (.eps cannot
+be supported due to the design of the PDF format; use regular TeX (DVI
+output) for that.)}
+
+\ifpdf
+  %
+  % Color manipulation macros based on pdfcolor.tex.
+  \def\cmykDarkRed{0.28 1 1 0.35}
+  \def\cmykBlack{0 0 0 1}
+  %
+  \def\pdfsetcolor#1{\pdfliteral{#1 k}}
+  % Set color, and create a mark which defines \thiscolor accordingly,
+  % so that \makeheadline knows which color to restore.
+  \def\setcolor#1{%
+    \xdef\lastcolordefs{\gdef\noexpand\thiscolor{#1}}%
+    \domark
+    \pdfsetcolor{#1}%
+  }
+  %
+  \def\maincolor{\cmykBlack}
+  \pdfsetcolor{\maincolor}
+  \edef\thiscolor{\maincolor}
+  \def\lastcolordefs{}
+  %
+  \def\makefootline{%
+    \baselineskip24pt
+    \line{\pdfsetcolor{\maincolor}\the\footline}%
+  }
+  %
+  \def\makeheadline{%
+    \vbox to 0pt{%
+      \vskip-22.5pt
+      \line{%
+        \vbox to8.5pt{}%
+        % Extract \thiscolor definition from the marks.
+        \getcolormarks
+        % Typeset the headline with \maincolor, then restore the color.
+        \pdfsetcolor{\maincolor}\the\headline\pdfsetcolor{\thiscolor}%
+      }%
+      \vss
+    }%
+    \nointerlineskip
+  }
+  %
+  %
+  \pdfcatalog{/PageMode /UseOutlines}
+  %
+  % #1 is image name, #2 width (might be empty/whitespace), #3 height (ditto).
+  \def\dopdfimage#1#2#3{%
+    \def\imagewidth{#2}\setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}%
+    \def\imageheight{#3}\setbox2 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #3}%
+    %
+    % pdftex (and the PDF format) support .png, .jpg, .pdf (among
+    % others).  Let's try in that order.
+    \let\pdfimgext=\empty
+    \begingroup
+      \openin 1 #1.png \ifeof 1
+        \openin 1 #1.jpg \ifeof 1
+          \openin 1 #1.jpeg \ifeof 1
+            \openin 1 #1.JPG \ifeof 1
+              \openin 1 #1.pdf \ifeof 1
+                \openin 1 #1.PDF \ifeof 1
+                  \errhelp = \nopdfimagehelp
+                  \errmessage{Could not find image file #1 for pdf}%
+                \else \gdef\pdfimgext{PDF}%
+                \fi
+              \else \gdef\pdfimgext{pdf}%
+              \fi
+            \else \gdef\pdfimgext{JPG}%
+            \fi
+          \else \gdef\pdfimgext{jpeg}%
+          \fi
+        \else \gdef\pdfimgext{jpg}%
+        \fi
+      \else \gdef\pdfimgext{png}%
+      \fi
+      \closein 1
+    \endgroup
+    %
+    % without \immediate, ancient pdftex seg faults when the same image is
+    % included twice.  (Version 3.14159-pre-1.0-unofficial-20010704.)
+    \ifnum\pdftexversion < 14
+      \immediate\pdfimage
+    \else
+      \immediate\pdfximage
+    \fi
+      \ifdim \wd0 >0pt width \imagewidth \fi
+      \ifdim \wd2 >0pt height \imageheight \fi
+      \ifnum\pdftexversion<13
+         #1.\pdfimgext
+       \else
+         {#1.\pdfimgext}%
+       \fi
+    \ifnum\pdftexversion < 14 \else
+      \pdfrefximage \pdflastximage
+    \fi}
+  %
+  \def\pdfmkdest#1{{%
+    % We have to set dummies so commands such as @code, and characters
+    % such as \, aren't expanded when present in a section title.
+    \indexnofonts
+    \turnoffactive
+    \activebackslashdouble
+    \makevalueexpandable
+    \def\pdfdestname{#1}%
+    \backslashparens\pdfdestname
+    \safewhatsit{\pdfdest name{\pdfdestname} xyz}%
+  }}
+  %
+  % used to mark target names; must be expandable.
+  \def\pdfmkpgn#1{#1}
+  %
+  % by default, use a color that is dark enough to print on paper as
+  % nearly black, but still distinguishable for online viewing.
+  \def\urlcolor{\cmykDarkRed}
+  \def\linkcolor{\cmykDarkRed}
+  \def\endlink{\setcolor{\maincolor}\pdfendlink}
+  %
+  % Adding outlines to PDF; macros for calculating structure of outlines
+  % come from Petr Olsak
+  \def\expnumber#1{\expandafter\ifx\csname#1\endcsname\relax 0%
+    \else \csname#1\endcsname \fi}
+  \def\advancenumber#1{\tempnum=\expnumber{#1}\relax
+    \advance\tempnum by 1
+    \expandafter\xdef\csname#1\endcsname{\the\tempnum}}
+  %
+  % #1 is the section text, which is what will be displayed in the
+  % outline by the pdf viewer.  #2 is the pdf expression for the number
+  % of subentries (or empty, for subsubsections).  #3 is the node text,
+  % which might be empty if this toc entry had no corresponding node.
+  % #4 is the page number
+  %
+  \def\dopdfoutline#1#2#3#4{%
+    % Generate a link to the node text if that exists; else, use the
+    % page number.  We could generate a destination for the section
+    % text in the case where a section has no node, but it doesn't
+    % seem worth the trouble, since most documents are normally structured.
+    \def\pdfoutlinedest{#3}%
+    \ifx\pdfoutlinedest\empty
+      \def\pdfoutlinedest{#4}%
+    \else
+      % Doubled backslashes in the name.
+      {\activebackslashdouble \xdef\pdfoutlinedest{#3}%
+       \backslashparens\pdfoutlinedest}%
+    \fi
+    %
+    % Also double the backslashes in the display string.
+    {\activebackslashdouble \xdef\pdfoutlinetext{#1}%
+     \backslashparens\pdfoutlinetext}%
+    %
+    \pdfoutline goto name{\pdfmkpgn{\pdfoutlinedest}}#2{\pdfoutlinetext}%
+  }
+  %
+  \def\pdfmakeoutlines{%
+    \begingroup
+      % Thanh's hack / proper braces in bookmarks
+      \edef\mylbrace{\iftrue \string{\else}\fi}\let\{=\mylbrace
+      \edef\myrbrace{\iffalse{\else\string}\fi}\let\}=\myrbrace
+      %
+      % Read toc silently, to get counts of subentries for \pdfoutline.
+      \def\numchapentry##1##2##3##4{%
+       \def\thischapnum{##2}%
+       \def\thissecnum{0}%
+       \def\thissubsecnum{0}%
+      }%
+      \def\numsecentry##1##2##3##4{%
+       \advancenumber{chap\thischapnum}%
+       \def\thissecnum{##2}%
+       \def\thissubsecnum{0}%
+      }%
+      \def\numsubsecentry##1##2##3##4{%
+       \advancenumber{sec\thissecnum}%
+       \def\thissubsecnum{##2}%
+      }%
+      \def\numsubsubsecentry##1##2##3##4{%
+       \advancenumber{subsec\thissubsecnum}%
+      }%
+      \def\thischapnum{0}%
+      \def\thissecnum{0}%
+      \def\thissubsecnum{0}%
+      %
+      % use \def rather than \let here because we redefine \chapentry et
+      % al. a second time, below.
+      \def\appentry{\numchapentry}%
+      \def\appsecentry{\numsecentry}%
+      \def\appsubsecentry{\numsubsecentry}%
+      \def\appsubsubsecentry{\numsubsubsecentry}%
+      \def\unnchapentry{\numchapentry}%
+      \def\unnsecentry{\numsecentry}%
+      \def\unnsubsecentry{\numsubsecentry}%
+      \def\unnsubsubsecentry{\numsubsubsecentry}%
+      \readdatafile{toc}%
+      %
+      % Read toc second time, this time actually producing the outlines.
+      % The `-' means take the \expnumber as the absolute number of
+      % subentries, which we calculated on our first read of the .toc above.
+      %
+      % We use the node names as the destinations.
+      \def\numchapentry##1##2##3##4{%
+        \dopdfoutline{##1}{count-\expnumber{chap##2}}{##3}{##4}}%
+      \def\numsecentry##1##2##3##4{%
+        \dopdfoutline{##1}{count-\expnumber{sec##2}}{##3}{##4}}%
+      \def\numsubsecentry##1##2##3##4{%
+        \dopdfoutline{##1}{count-\expnumber{subsec##2}}{##3}{##4}}%
+      \def\numsubsubsecentry##1##2##3##4{% count is always zero
+        \dopdfoutline{##1}{}{##3}{##4}}%
+      %
+      % PDF outlines are displayed using system fonts, instead of
+      % document fonts.  Therefore we cannot use special characters,
+      % since the encoding is unknown.  For example, the eogonek from
+      % Latin 2 (0xea) gets translated to a | character.  Info from
+      % Staszek Wawrykiewicz, 19 Jan 2004 04:09:24 +0100.
+      %
+      % xx to do this right, we have to translate 8-bit characters to
+      % their "best" equivalent, based on the @documentencoding.  Right
+      % now, I guess we'll just let the pdf reader have its way.
+      \indexnofonts
+      \setupdatafile
+      \catcode`\\=\active \otherbackslash
+      \input \tocreadfilename
+    \endgroup
+  }
+  %
+  \def\skipspaces#1{\def\PP{#1}\def\D{|}%
+    \ifx\PP\D\let\nextsp\relax
+    \else\let\nextsp\skipspaces
+      \ifx\p\space\else\addtokens{\filename}{\PP}%
+        \advance\filenamelength by 1
+      \fi
+    \fi
+    \nextsp}
+  \def\getfilename#1{\filenamelength=0\expandafter\skipspaces#1|\relax}
+  \ifnum\pdftexversion < 14
+    \let \startlink \pdfannotlink
+  \else
+    \let \startlink \pdfstartlink
+  \fi
+  % make a live url in pdf output.
+  \def\pdfurl#1{%
+    \begingroup
+      % it seems we really need yet another set of dummies; have not
+      % tried to figure out what each command should do in the context
+      % of @url.  for now, just make @/ a no-op, that's the only one
+      % people have actually reported a problem with.
+      % 
+      \normalturnoffactive
+      \def\@{@}%
+      \let\/=\empty
+      \makevalueexpandable
+      \leavevmode\setcolor{\urlcolor}%
+      \startlink attr{/Border [0 0 0]}%
+        user{/Subtype /Link /A << /S /URI /URI (#1) >>}%
+    \endgroup}
+  \def\pdfgettoks#1.{\setbox\boxA=\hbox{\toksA={#1.}\toksB={}\maketoks}}
+  \def\addtokens#1#2{\edef\addtoks{\noexpand#1={\the#1#2}}\addtoks}
+  \def\adn#1{\addtokens{\toksC}{#1}\global\countA=1\let\next=\maketoks}
+  \def\poptoks#1#2|ENDTOKS|{\let\first=#1\toksD={#1}\toksA={#2}}
+  \def\maketoks{%
+    \expandafter\poptoks\the\toksA|ENDTOKS|\relax
+    \ifx\first0\adn0
+    \else\ifx\first1\adn1 \else\ifx\first2\adn2 \else\ifx\first3\adn3
+    \else\ifx\first4\adn4 \else\ifx\first5\adn5 \else\ifx\first6\adn6
+    \else\ifx\first7\adn7 \else\ifx\first8\adn8 \else\ifx\first9\adn9
+    \else
+      \ifnum0=\countA\else\makelink\fi
+      \ifx\first.\let\next=\done\else
+        \let\next=\maketoks
+        \addtokens{\toksB}{\the\toksD}
+        \ifx\first,\addtokens{\toksB}{\space}\fi
+      \fi
+    \fi\fi\fi\fi\fi\fi\fi\fi\fi\fi
+    \next}
+  \def\makelink{\addtokens{\toksB}%
+    {\noexpand\pdflink{\the\toksC}}\toksC={}\global\countA=0}
+  \def\pdflink#1{%
+    \startlink attr{/Border [0 0 0]} goto name{\pdfmkpgn{#1}}
+    \setcolor{\linkcolor}#1\endlink}
+  \def\done{\edef\st{\global\noexpand\toksA={\the\toksB}}\st}
+\else
+  \let\pdfmkdest = \gobble
+  \let\pdfurl = \gobble
+  \let\endlink = \relax
+  \let\setcolor = \gobble
+  \let\pdfsetcolor = \gobble
+  \let\pdfmakeoutlines = \relax
+\fi  % \ifx\pdfoutput
+
+
+\message{fonts,}
+
+% Change the current font style to #1, remembering it in \curfontstyle.
+% For now, we do not accumulate font styles: @b{@i{foo}} prints foo in
+% italics, not bold italics.
+%
+\def\setfontstyle#1{%
+  \def\curfontstyle{#1}% not as a control sequence, because we are \edef'd.
+  \csname ten#1\endcsname  % change the current font
+}
+
+% Select #1 fonts with the current style.
+%
+\def\selectfonts#1{\csname #1fonts\endcsname \csname\curfontstyle\endcsname}
+
+\def\rm{\fam=0 \setfontstyle{rm}}
+\def\it{\fam=\itfam \setfontstyle{it}}
+\def\sl{\fam=\slfam \setfontstyle{sl}}
+\def\bf{\fam=\bffam \setfontstyle{bf}}\def\bfstylename{bf}
+\def\tt{\fam=\ttfam \setfontstyle{tt}}
+
+% Texinfo sort of supports the sans serif font style, which plain TeX does not.
+% So we set up a \sf.
+\newfam\sffam
+\def\sf{\fam=\sffam \setfontstyle{sf}}
+\let\li = \sf % Sometimes we call it \li, not \sf.
+
+% We don't need math for this font style.
+\def\ttsl{\setfontstyle{ttsl}}
+
+
+% Default leading.
+\newdimen\textleading  \textleading = 13.2pt
+
+% Set the baselineskip to #1, and the lineskip and strut size
+% correspondingly.  There is no deep meaning behind these magic numbers
+% used as factors; they just match (closely enough) what Knuth defined.
+%
+\def\lineskipfactor{.08333}
+\def\strutheightpercent{.70833}
+\def\strutdepthpercent {.29167}
+%
+% can get a sort of poor man's double spacing by redefining this.
+\def\baselinefactor{1}
+%
+\def\setleading#1{%
+  \dimen0 = #1\relax
+  \normalbaselineskip = \baselinefactor\dimen0
+  \normallineskip = \lineskipfactor\normalbaselineskip
+  \normalbaselines
+  \setbox\strutbox =\hbox{%
+    \vrule width0pt height\strutheightpercent\baselineskip
+                    depth \strutdepthpercent \baselineskip
+  }%
+}
+
+% PDF CMaps.  See also LaTeX's t1.cmap.
+%
+% do nothing with this by default.
+\expandafter\let\csname cmapOT1\endcsname\gobble
+\expandafter\let\csname cmapOT1IT\endcsname\gobble
+\expandafter\let\csname cmapOT1TT\endcsname\gobble
+
+% if we are producing pdf, and we have \pdffontattr, then define cmaps.
+% (\pdffontattr was introduced many years ago, but people still run
+% older pdftex's; it's easy to conditionalize, so we do.)
+\ifpdf \ifx\pdffontattr\undefined \else
+  \begingroup
+    \catcode`\^^M=\active \def^^M{^^J}% Output line endings as the ^^J char.
+    \catcode`\%=12 \immediate\pdfobj stream {%!PS-Adobe-3.0 Resource-CMap
+%%DocumentNeededResources: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%IncludeResource: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%BeginResource: CMap (TeX-OT1-0)
+%%Title: (TeX-OT1-0 TeX OT1 0)
+%%Version: 1.000
+%%EndComments
+/CIDInit /ProcSet findresource begin
+12 dict begin
+begincmap
+/CIDSystemInfo
+<< /Registry (TeX)
+/Ordering (OT1)
+/Supplement 0
+>> def
+/CMapName /TeX-OT1-0 def
+/CMapType 2 def
+1 begincodespacerange
+<00> <7F>
+endcodespacerange
+8 beginbfrange
+<00> <01> <0393>
+<09> <0A> <03A8>
+<23> <26> <0023>
+<28> <3B> <0028>
+<3F> <5B> <003F>
+<5D> <5E> <005D>
+<61> <7A> <0061>
+<7B> <7C> <2013>
+endbfrange
+40 beginbfchar
+<02> <0398>
+<03> <039B>
+<04> <039E>
+<05> <03A0>
+<06> <03A3>
+<07> <03D2>
+<08> <03A6>
+<0B> <00660066>
+<0C> <00660069>
+<0D> <0066006C>
+<0E> <006600660069>
+<0F> <00660066006C>
+<10> <0131>
+<11> <0237>
+<12> <0060>
+<13> <00B4>
+<14> <02C7>
+<15> <02D8>
+<16> <00AF>
+<17> <02DA>
+<18> <00B8>
+<19> <00DF>
+<1A> <00E6>
+<1B> <0153>
+<1C> <00F8>
+<1D> <00C6>
+<1E> <0152>
+<1F> <00D8>
+<21> <0021>
+<22> <201D>
+<27> <2019>
+<3C> <00A1>
+<3D> <003D>
+<3E> <00BF>
+<5C> <201C>
+<5F> <02D9>
+<60> <2018>
+<7D> <02DD>
+<7E> <007E>
+<7F> <00A8>
+endbfchar
+endcmap
+CMapName currentdict /CMap defineresource pop
+end
+end
+%%EndResource
+%%EOF
+    }\endgroup
+  \expandafter\edef\csname cmapOT1\endcsname#1{%
+    \pdffontattr#1{/ToUnicode \the\pdflastobj\space 0 R}%
+  }%
+%
+% \cmapOT1IT
+  \begingroup
+    \catcode`\^^M=\active \def^^M{^^J}% Output line endings as the ^^J char.
+    \catcode`\%=12 \immediate\pdfobj stream {%!PS-Adobe-3.0 Resource-CMap
+%%DocumentNeededResources: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%IncludeResource: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%BeginResource: CMap (TeX-OT1IT-0)
+%%Title: (TeX-OT1IT-0 TeX OT1IT 0)
+%%Version: 1.000
+%%EndComments
+/CIDInit /ProcSet findresource begin
+12 dict begin
+begincmap
+/CIDSystemInfo
+<< /Registry (TeX)
+/Ordering (OT1IT)
+/Supplement 0
+>> def
+/CMapName /TeX-OT1IT-0 def
+/CMapType 2 def
+1 begincodespacerange
+<00> <7F>
+endcodespacerange
+8 beginbfrange
+<00> <01> <0393>
+<09> <0A> <03A8>
+<25> <26> <0025>
+<28> <3B> <0028>
+<3F> <5B> <003F>
+<5D> <5E> <005D>
+<61> <7A> <0061>
+<7B> <7C> <2013>
+endbfrange
+42 beginbfchar
+<02> <0398>
+<03> <039B>
+<04> <039E>
+<05> <03A0>
+<06> <03A3>
+<07> <03D2>
+<08> <03A6>
+<0B> <00660066>
+<0C> <00660069>
+<0D> <0066006C>
+<0E> <006600660069>
+<0F> <00660066006C>
+<10> <0131>
+<11> <0237>
+<12> <0060>
+<13> <00B4>
+<14> <02C7>
+<15> <02D8>
+<16> <00AF>
+<17> <02DA>
+<18> <00B8>
+<19> <00DF>
+<1A> <00E6>
+<1B> <0153>
+<1C> <00F8>
+<1D> <00C6>
+<1E> <0152>
+<1F> <00D8>
+<21> <0021>
+<22> <201D>
+<23> <0023>
+<24> <00A3>
+<27> <2019>
+<3C> <00A1>
+<3D> <003D>
+<3E> <00BF>
+<5C> <201C>
+<5F> <02D9>
+<60> <2018>
+<7D> <02DD>
+<7E> <007E>
+<7F> <00A8>
+endbfchar
+endcmap
+CMapName currentdict /CMap defineresource pop
+end
+end
+%%EndResource
+%%EOF
+    }\endgroup
+  \expandafter\edef\csname cmapOT1IT\endcsname#1{%
+    \pdffontattr#1{/ToUnicode \the\pdflastobj\space 0 R}%
+  }%
+%
+% \cmapOT1TT
+  \begingroup
+    \catcode`\^^M=\active \def^^M{^^J}% Output line endings as the ^^J char.
+    \catcode`\%=12 \immediate\pdfobj stream {%!PS-Adobe-3.0 Resource-CMap
+%%DocumentNeededResources: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%IncludeResource: ProcSet (CIDInit)
+%%BeginResource: CMap (TeX-OT1TT-0)
+%%Title: (TeX-OT1TT-0 TeX OT1TT 0)
+%%Version: 1.000
+%%EndComments
+/CIDInit /ProcSet findresource begin
+12 dict begin
+begincmap
+/CIDSystemInfo
+<< /Registry (TeX)
+/Ordering (OT1TT)
+/Supplement 0
+>> def
+/CMapName /TeX-OT1TT-0 def
+/CMapType 2 def
+1 begincodespacerange
+<00> <7F>
+endcodespacerange
+5 beginbfrange
+<00> <01> <0393>
+<09> <0A> <03A8>
+<21> <26> <0021>
+<28> <5F> <0028>
+<61> <7E> <0061>
+endbfrange
+32 beginbfchar
+<02> <0398>
+<03> <039B>
+<04> <039E>
+<05> <03A0>
+<06> <03A3>
+<07> <03D2>
+<08> <03A6>
+<0B> <2191>
+<0C> <2193>
+<0D> <0027>
+<0E> <00A1>
+<0F> <00BF>
+<10> <0131>
+<11> <0237>
+<12> <0060>
+<13> <00B4>
+<14> <02C7>
+<15> <02D8>
+<16> <00AF>
+<17> <02DA>
+<18> <00B8>
+<19> <00DF>
+<1A> <00E6>
+<1B> <0153>
+<1C> <00F8>
+<1D> <00C6>
+<1E> <0152>
+<1F> <00D8>
+<20> <2423>
+<27> <2019>
+<60> <2018>
+<7F> <00A8>
+endbfchar
+endcmap
+CMapName currentdict /CMap defineresource pop
+end
+end
+%%EndResource
+%%EOF
+    }\endgroup
+  \expandafter\edef\csname cmapOT1TT\endcsname#1{%
+    \pdffontattr#1{/ToUnicode \the\pdflastobj\space 0 R}%
+  }%
+\fi\fi
+
+
+% Set the font macro #1 to the font named #2, adding on the
+% specified font prefix (normally `cm').
+% #3 is the font's design size, #4 is a scale factor, #5 is the CMap
+% encoding (currently only OT1, OT1IT and OT1TT are allowed, pass
+% empty to omit).
+\def\setfont#1#2#3#4#5{%
+  \font#1=\fontprefix#2#3 scaled #4
+  \csname cmap#5\endcsname#1%
+}
+% This is what gets called when #5 of \setfont is empty.
+\let\cmap\gobble
+% emacs-page end of cmaps
+
+% Use cm as the default font prefix.
+% To specify the font prefix, you must define \fontprefix
+% before you read in texinfo.tex.
+\ifx\fontprefix\undefined
+\def\fontprefix{cm}
+\fi
+% Support font families that don't use the same naming scheme as CM.
+\def\rmshape{r}
+\def\rmbshape{bx}               %where the normal face is bold
+\def\bfshape{b}
+\def\bxshape{bx}
+\def\ttshape{tt}
+\def\ttbshape{tt}
+\def\ttslshape{sltt}
+\def\itshape{ti}
+\def\itbshape{bxti}
+\def\slshape{sl}
+\def\slbshape{bxsl}
+\def\sfshape{ss}
+\def\sfbshape{ss}
+\def\scshape{csc}
+\def\scbshape{csc}
+
+% Definitions for a main text size of 11pt.  This is the default in
+% Texinfo.
+% 
+\def\definetextfontsizexi{%
+% Text fonts (11.2pt, magstep1).
+\def\textnominalsize{11pt}
+\edef\mainmagstep{\magstephalf}
+\setfont\textrm\rmshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\texttt\ttshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\textbf\bfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textit\itshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\textsl\slshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textsf\sfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textsc\scshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textttsl\ttslshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1TT}
+\font\texti=cmmi10 scaled \mainmagstep
+\font\textsy=cmsy10 scaled \mainmagstep
+\def\textecsize{1095}
+
+% A few fonts for @defun names and args.
+\setfont\defbf\bfshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\setfont\deftt\ttshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\defttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1TT}
+\def\df{\let\tentt=\deftt \let\tenbf = \defbf \let\tenttsl=\defttsl \bf}
+
+% Fonts for indices, footnotes, small examples (9pt).
+\def\smallnominalsize{9pt}
+\setfont\smallrm\rmshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smalltt\ttshape{9}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\smallbf\bfshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallit\itshape{9}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\smallsl\slshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallsf\sfshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallsc\scshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallttsl\ttslshape{10}{900}{OT1TT}
+\font\smalli=cmmi9
+\font\smallsy=cmsy9
+\def\smallecsize{0900}
+
+% Fonts for small examples (8pt).
+\def\smallernominalsize{8pt}
+\setfont\smallerrm\rmshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallertt\ttshape{8}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\smallerbf\bfshape{10}{800}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallerit\itshape{8}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\smallersl\slshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallersf\sfshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallersc\scshape{10}{800}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallerttsl\ttslshape{10}{800}{OT1TT}
+\font\smalleri=cmmi8
+\font\smallersy=cmsy8
+\def\smallerecsize{0800}
+
+% Fonts for title page (20.4pt):
+\def\titlenominalsize{20pt}
+\setfont\titlerm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep3}{OT1}
+\setfont\titleit\itbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\titlesl\slbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1}
+\setfont\titlett\ttbshape{12}{\magstep3}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\titlettsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\titlesf\sfbshape{17}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\let\titlebf=\titlerm
+\setfont\titlesc\scbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1}
+\font\titlei=cmmi12 scaled \magstep3
+\font\titlesy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep4
+\def\authorrm{\secrm}
+\def\authortt{\sectt}
+\def\titleecsize{2074}
+
+% Chapter (and unnumbered) fonts (17.28pt).
+\def\chapnominalsize{17pt}
+\setfont\chaprm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep2}{OT1}
+\setfont\chapit\itbshape{10}{\magstep3}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\chapsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep3}{OT1}
+\setfont\chaptt\ttbshape{12}{\magstep2}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\chapttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep3}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\chapsf\sfbshape{17}{1000}{OT1}
+\let\chapbf=\chaprm
+\setfont\chapsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep3}{OT1}
+\font\chapi=cmmi12 scaled \magstep2
+\font\chapsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep3
+\def\chapecsize{1728}
+
+% Section fonts (14.4pt).
+\def\secnominalsize{14pt}
+\setfont\secrm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\setfont\secit\itbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\secsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1}
+\setfont\sectt\ttbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\secttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\secsf\sfbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\let\secbf\secrm
+\setfont\secsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1}
+\font\seci=cmmi12 scaled \magstep1
+\font\secsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep2
+\def\sececsize{1440}
+
+% Subsection fonts (13.15pt).
+\def\ssecnominalsize{13pt}
+\setfont\ssecrm\rmbshape{12}{\magstephalf}{OT1}
+\setfont\ssecit\itbshape{10}{1315}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\ssecsl\slbshape{10}{1315}{OT1}
+\setfont\ssectt\ttbshape{12}{\magstephalf}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\ssecttsl\ttslshape{10}{1315}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\ssecsf\sfbshape{12}{\magstephalf}{OT1}
+\let\ssecbf\ssecrm
+\setfont\ssecsc\scbshape{10}{1315}{OT1}
+\font\sseci=cmmi12 scaled \magstephalf
+\font\ssecsy=cmsy10 scaled 1315
+\def\ssececsize{1200}
+
+% Reduced fonts for @acro in text (10pt).
+\def\reducednominalsize{10pt}
+\setfont\reducedrm\rmshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedtt\ttshape{10}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\reducedbf\bfshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedit\itshape{10}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\reducedsl\slshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedsf\sfshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedsc\scshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedttsl\ttslshape{10}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\font\reducedi=cmmi10
+\font\reducedsy=cmsy10
+\def\reducedecsize{1000}
+
+% reset the current fonts
+\textfonts
+\rm
+} % end of 11pt text font size definitions
+
+
+% Definitions to make the main text be 10pt Computer Modern, with
+% section, chapter, etc., sizes following suit.  This is for the GNU
+% Press printing of the Emacs 22 manual.  Maybe other manuals in the
+% future.  Used with @smallbook, which sets the leading to 12pt.
+% 
+\def\definetextfontsizex{%
+% Text fonts (10pt).
+\def\textnominalsize{10pt}
+\edef\mainmagstep{1000}
+\setfont\textrm\rmshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\texttt\ttshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\textbf\bfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textit\itshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\textsl\slshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textsf\sfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textsc\scshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1}
+\setfont\textttsl\ttslshape{10}{\mainmagstep}{OT1TT}
+\font\texti=cmmi10 scaled \mainmagstep
+\font\textsy=cmsy10 scaled \mainmagstep
+\def\textecsize{1000}
+
+% A few fonts for @defun names and args.
+\setfont\defbf\bfshape{10}{\magstephalf}{OT1}
+\setfont\deftt\ttshape{10}{\magstephalf}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\defttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstephalf}{OT1TT}
+\def\df{\let\tentt=\deftt \let\tenbf = \defbf \let\tenttsl=\defttsl \bf}
+
+% Fonts for indices, footnotes, small examples (9pt).
+\def\smallnominalsize{9pt}
+\setfont\smallrm\rmshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smalltt\ttshape{9}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\smallbf\bfshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallit\itshape{9}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\smallsl\slshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallsf\sfshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallsc\scshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallttsl\ttslshape{10}{900}{OT1TT}
+\font\smalli=cmmi9
+\font\smallsy=cmsy9
+\def\smallecsize{0900}
+
+% Fonts for small examples (8pt).
+\def\smallernominalsize{8pt}
+\setfont\smallerrm\rmshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallertt\ttshape{8}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\smallerbf\bfshape{10}{800}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallerit\itshape{8}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\smallersl\slshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallersf\sfshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallersc\scshape{10}{800}{OT1}
+\setfont\smallerttsl\ttslshape{10}{800}{OT1TT}
+\font\smalleri=cmmi8
+\font\smallersy=cmsy8
+\def\smallerecsize{0800}
+
+% Fonts for title page (20.4pt):
+\def\titlenominalsize{20pt}
+\setfont\titlerm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep3}{OT1}
+\setfont\titleit\itbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\titlesl\slbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1}
+\setfont\titlett\ttbshape{12}{\magstep3}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\titlettsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\titlesf\sfbshape{17}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\let\titlebf=\titlerm
+\setfont\titlesc\scbshape{10}{\magstep4}{OT1}
+\font\titlei=cmmi12 scaled \magstep3
+\font\titlesy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep4
+\def\authorrm{\secrm}
+\def\authortt{\sectt}
+\def\titleecsize{2074}
+
+% Chapter fonts (14.4pt).
+\def\chapnominalsize{14pt}
+\setfont\chaprm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\setfont\chapit\itbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\chapsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1}
+\setfont\chaptt\ttbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\chapttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\chapsf\sfbshape{12}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\let\chapbf\chaprm
+\setfont\chapsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep2}{OT1}
+\font\chapi=cmmi12 scaled \magstep1
+\font\chapsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep2
+\def\chapecsize{1440}
+
+% Section fonts (12pt).
+\def\secnominalsize{12pt}
+\setfont\secrm\rmbshape{12}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\secit\itbshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\secsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\setfont\sectt\ttbshape{12}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\secttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\secsf\sfbshape{12}{1000}{OT1}
+\let\secbf\secrm
+\setfont\secsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1}
+\font\seci=cmmi12 
+\font\secsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep1
+\def\sececsize{1200}
+
+% Subsection fonts (10pt).
+\def\ssecnominalsize{10pt}
+\setfont\ssecrm\rmbshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\ssecit\itbshape{10}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\ssecsl\slbshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\ssectt\ttbshape{10}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\ssecttsl\ttslshape{10}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\ssecsf\sfbshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\let\ssecbf\ssecrm
+\setfont\ssecsc\scbshape{10}{1000}{OT1}
+\font\sseci=cmmi10
+\font\ssecsy=cmsy10
+\def\ssececsize{1000}
+
+% Reduced fonts for @acro in text (9pt).
+\def\reducednominalsize{9pt}
+\setfont\reducedrm\rmshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedtt\ttshape{9}{1000}{OT1TT}
+\setfont\reducedbf\bfshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedit\itshape{9}{1000}{OT1IT}
+\setfont\reducedsl\slshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedsf\sfshape{9}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedsc\scshape{10}{900}{OT1}
+\setfont\reducedttsl\ttslshape{10}{900}{OT1TT}
+\font\reducedi=cmmi9
+\font\reducedsy=cmsy9
+\def\reducedecsize{0900}
+
+% reduce space between paragraphs
+\divide\parskip by 2
+
+% reset the current fonts
+\textfonts
+\rm
+} % end of 10pt text font size definitions
+
+
+% We provide the user-level command
+%   @fonttextsize 10
+% (or 11) to redefine the text font size.  pt is assumed.
+% 
+\def\xword{10}
+\def\xiword{11}
+%
+\parseargdef\fonttextsize{%
+  \def\textsizearg{#1}%
+  \wlog{doing @fonttextsize \textsizearg}%
+  %
+  % Set \globaldefs so that documents can use this inside @tex, since
+  % makeinfo 4.8 does not support it, but we need it nonetheless.
+  % 
+ \begingroup \globaldefs=1
+  \ifx\textsizearg\xword \definetextfontsizex
+  \else \ifx\textsizearg\xiword \definetextfontsizexi
+  \else
+    \errhelp=\EMsimple
+    \errmessage{@fonttextsize only supports `10' or `11', not `\textsizearg'}
+  \fi\fi
+ \endgroup
+}
+
+
+% In order for the font changes to affect most math symbols and letters,
+% we have to define the \textfont of the standard families.  Since
+% texinfo doesn't allow for producing subscripts and superscripts except
+% in the main text, we don't bother to reset \scriptfont and
+% \scriptscriptfont (which would also require loading a lot more fonts).
+%
+\def\resetmathfonts{%
+  \textfont0=\tenrm \textfont1=\teni \textfont2=\tensy
+  \textfont\itfam=\tenit \textfont\slfam=\tensl \textfont\bffam=\tenbf
+  \textfont\ttfam=\tentt \textfont\sffam=\tensf
+}
+
+% The font-changing commands redefine the meanings of \tenSTYLE, instead
+% of just \STYLE.  We do this because \STYLE needs to also set the
+% current \fam for math mode.  Our \STYLE (e.g., \rm) commands hardwire
+% \tenSTYLE to set the current font.
+%
+% Each font-changing command also sets the names \lsize (one size lower)
+% and \lllsize (three sizes lower).  These relative commands are used in
+% the LaTeX logo and acronyms.
+%
+% This all needs generalizing, badly.
+%
+\def\textfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\textrm \let\tenit=\textit \let\tensl=\textsl
+  \let\tenbf=\textbf \let\tentt=\texttt \let\smallcaps=\textsc
+  \let\tensf=\textsf \let\teni=\texti \let\tensy=\textsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\textttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{text}%
+  \def\lsize{reduced}\def\lllsize{smaller}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{\textleading}}
+\def\titlefonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\titlerm \let\tenit=\titleit \let\tensl=\titlesl
+  \let\tenbf=\titlebf \let\tentt=\titlett \let\smallcaps=\titlesc
+  \let\tensf=\titlesf \let\teni=\titlei \let\tensy=\titlesy
+  \let\tenttsl=\titlettsl
+  \def\curfontsize{title}%
+  \def\lsize{chap}\def\lllsize{subsec}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{25pt}}
+\def\titlefont#1{{\titlefonts\rm #1}}
+\def\chapfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\chaprm \let\tenit=\chapit \let\tensl=\chapsl
+  \let\tenbf=\chapbf \let\tentt=\chaptt \let\smallcaps=\chapsc
+  \let\tensf=\chapsf \let\teni=\chapi \let\tensy=\chapsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\chapttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{chap}%
+  \def\lsize{sec}\def\lllsize{text}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{19pt}}
+\def\secfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\secrm \let\tenit=\secit \let\tensl=\secsl
+  \let\tenbf=\secbf \let\tentt=\sectt \let\smallcaps=\secsc
+  \let\tensf=\secsf \let\teni=\seci \let\tensy=\secsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\secttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{sec}%
+  \def\lsize{subsec}\def\lllsize{reduced}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{16pt}}
+\def\subsecfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\ssecrm \let\tenit=\ssecit \let\tensl=\ssecsl
+  \let\tenbf=\ssecbf \let\tentt=\ssectt \let\smallcaps=\ssecsc
+  \let\tensf=\ssecsf \let\teni=\sseci \let\tensy=\ssecsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\ssecttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{ssec}%
+  \def\lsize{text}\def\lllsize{small}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{15pt}}
+\let\subsubsecfonts = \subsecfonts
+\def\reducedfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\reducedrm \let\tenit=\reducedit \let\tensl=\reducedsl
+  \let\tenbf=\reducedbf \let\tentt=\reducedtt \let\reducedcaps=\reducedsc
+  \let\tensf=\reducedsf \let\teni=\reducedi \let\tensy=\reducedsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\reducedttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{reduced}%
+  \def\lsize{small}\def\lllsize{smaller}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{10.5pt}}
+\def\smallfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\smallrm \let\tenit=\smallit \let\tensl=\smallsl
+  \let\tenbf=\smallbf \let\tentt=\smalltt \let\smallcaps=\smallsc
+  \let\tensf=\smallsf \let\teni=\smalli \let\tensy=\smallsy
+  \let\tenttsl=\smallttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{small}%
+  \def\lsize{smaller}\def\lllsize{smaller}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{10.5pt}}
+\def\smallerfonts{%
+  \let\tenrm=\smallerrm \let\tenit=\smallerit \let\tensl=\smallersl
+  \let\tenbf=\smallerbf \let\tentt=\smallertt \let\smallcaps=\smallersc
+  \let\tensf=\smallersf \let\teni=\smalleri \let\tensy=\smallersy
+  \let\tenttsl=\smallerttsl
+  \def\curfontsize{smaller}%
+  \def\lsize{smaller}\def\lllsize{smaller}%
+  \resetmathfonts \setleading{9.5pt}}
+
+% Set the fonts to use with the @small... environments.
+\let\smallexamplefonts = \smallfonts
+
+% About \smallexamplefonts.  If we use \smallfonts (9pt), @smallexample
+% can fit this many characters:
+%   8.5x11=86   smallbook=72  a4=90  a5=69
+% If we use \scriptfonts (8pt), then we can fit this many characters:
+%   8.5x11=90+  smallbook=80  a4=90+  a5=77
+% For me, subjectively, the few extra characters that fit aren't worth
+% the additional smallness of 8pt.  So I'm making the default 9pt.
+%
+% By the way, for comparison, here's what fits with @example (10pt):
+%   8.5x11=71  smallbook=60  a4=75  a5=58
+%
+% I wish the USA used A4 paper.
+% --karl, 24jan03.
+
+
+% Set up the default fonts, so we can use them for creating boxes.
+%
+\definetextfontsizexi
+
+% Define these so they can be easily changed for other fonts.
+\def\angleleft{$\langle$}
+\def\angleright{$\rangle$}
+
+% Count depth in font-changes, for error checks
+\newcount\fontdepth \fontdepth=0
+
+% Fonts for short table of contents.
+\setfont\shortcontrm\rmshape{12}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\shortcontbf\bfshape{10}{\magstep1}{OT1}  % no cmb12
+\setfont\shortcontsl\slshape{12}{1000}{OT1}
+\setfont\shortconttt\ttshape{12}{1000}{OT1TT}
+
+%% Add scribe-like font environments, plus @l for inline lisp (usually sans
+%% serif) and @ii for TeX italic
+
+% \smartitalic{ARG} outputs arg in italics, followed by an italic correction
+% unless the following character is such as not to need one.
+\def\smartitalicx{\ifx\next,\else\ifx\next-\else\ifx\next.\else
+                    \ptexslash\fi\fi\fi}
+\def\smartslanted#1{{\ifusingtt\ttsl\sl #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
+\def\smartitalic#1{{\ifusingtt\ttsl\it #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
+
+% like \smartslanted except unconditionally uses \ttsl.
+% @var is set to this for defun arguments.
+\def\ttslanted#1{{\ttsl #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
+
+% like \smartslanted except unconditionally use \sl.  We never want
+% ttsl for book titles, do we?
+\def\cite#1{{\sl #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
+
+\let\i=\smartitalic
+\let\slanted=\smartslanted
+\let\var=\smartslanted
+\let\dfn=\smartslanted
+\let\emph=\smartitalic
+
+% @b, explicit bold.
+\def\b#1{{\bf #1}}
+\let\strong=\b
+
+% @sansserif, explicit sans.
+\def\sansserif#1{{\sf #1}}
+
+% We can't just use \exhyphenpenalty, because that only has effect at
+% the end of a paragraph.  Restore normal hyphenation at the end of the
+% group within which \nohyphenation is presumably called.
+%
+\def\nohyphenation{\hyphenchar\font = -1  \aftergroup\restorehyphenation}
+\def\restorehyphenation{\hyphenchar\font = `- }
+
+% Set sfcode to normal for the chars that usually have another value.
+% Can't use plain's \frenchspacing because it uses the `\x notation, and
+% sometimes \x has an active definition that messes things up.
+%
+\catcode`@=11
+  \def\plainfrenchspacing{%
+    \sfcode\dotChar  =\@m \sfcode\questChar=\@m \sfcode\exclamChar=\@m
+    \sfcode\colonChar=\@m \sfcode\semiChar =\@m \sfcode\commaChar =\@m
+    \def\endofsentencespacefactor{1000}% for @. and friends
+  }
+  \def\plainnonfrenchspacing{%
+    \sfcode`\.3000\sfcode`\?3000\sfcode`\!3000
+    \sfcode`\:2000\sfcode`\;1500\sfcode`\,1250
+    \def\endofsentencespacefactor{3000}% for @. and friends
+  }
+\catcode`@=\other
+\def\endofsentencespacefactor{3000}% default
+
+\def\t#1{%
+  {\tt \rawbackslash \plainfrenchspacing #1}%
+  \null
+}
+\def\samp#1{`\tclose{#1}'\null}
+\setfont\keyrm\rmshape{8}{1000}{OT1}
+\font\keysy=cmsy9
+\def\key#1{{\keyrm\textfont2=\keysy \leavevmode\hbox{%
+  \raise0.4pt\hbox{\angleleft}\kern-.08em\vtop{%
+    \vbox{\hrule\kern-0.4pt
+     \hbox{\raise0.4pt\hbox{\vphantom{\angleleft}}#1}}%
+    \kern-0.4pt\hrule}%
+  \kern-.06em\raise0.4pt\hbox{\angleright}}}}
+\def\key #1{{\nohyphenation \uppercase{#1}}\null}
+% The old definition, with no lozenge:
+%\def\key #1{{\ttsl \nohyphenation \uppercase{#1}}\null}
+\def\ctrl #1{{\tt \rawbackslash \hat}#1}
+
+% @file, @option are the same as @samp.
+\let\file=\samp
+\let\option=\samp
+
+% @code is a modification of @t,
+% which makes spaces the same size as normal in the surrounding text.
+\def\tclose#1{%
+  {%
+    % Change normal interword space to be same as for the current font.
+    \spaceskip = \fontdimen2\font
+    %
+    % Switch to typewriter.
+    \tt
+    %
+    % But `\ ' produces the large typewriter interword space.
+    \def\ {{\spaceskip = 0pt{} }}%
+    %
+    % Turn off hyphenation.
+    \nohyphenation
+    %
+    \rawbackslash
+    \plainfrenchspacing
+    #1%
+  }%
+  \null
+}
+
+% We *must* turn on hyphenation at `-' and `_' in @code.
+% Otherwise, it is too hard to avoid overfull hboxes
+% in the Emacs manual, the Library manual, etc.
+
+% Unfortunately, TeX uses one parameter (\hyphenchar) to control
+% both hyphenation at - and hyphenation within words.
+% We must therefore turn them both off (\tclose does that)
+% and arrange explicitly to hyphenate at a dash.
+%  -- rms.
+{
+  \catcode`\-=\active \catcode`\_=\active
+  \catcode`\'=\active \catcode`\`=\active
+  %
+  \global\def\code{\begingroup
+    \catcode\rquoteChar=\active \catcode\lquoteChar=\active
+    \let'\codequoteright \let`\codequoteleft
+    %
+    \catcode\dashChar=\active  \catcode\underChar=\active
+    \ifallowcodebreaks
+     \let-\codedash
+     \let_\codeunder
+    \else
+     \let-\realdash
+     \let_\realunder
+    \fi
+    \codex
+  }
+}
+
+\def\realdash{-}
+\def\codedash{-\discretionary{}{}{}}
+\def\codeunder{%
+  % this is all so @math{@code{var_name}+1} can work.  In math mode, _
+  % is "active" (mathcode"8000) and \normalunderscore (or \char95, etc.)
+  % will therefore expand the active definition of _, which is us
+  % (inside @code that is), therefore an endless loop.
+  \ifusingtt{\ifmmode
+               \mathchar"075F % class 0=ordinary, family 7=ttfam, pos 0x5F=_.
+             \else\normalunderscore \fi
+             \discretionary{}{}{}}%
+            {\_}%
+}
+\def\codex #1{\tclose{#1}\endgroup}
+
+% An additional complication: the above will allow breaks after, e.g.,
+% each of the four underscores in __typeof__.  This is undesirable in
+% some manuals, especially if they don't have long identifiers in
+% general.  @allowcodebreaks provides a way to control this.
+% 
+\newif\ifallowcodebreaks  \allowcodebreakstrue
+
+\def\keywordtrue{true}
+\def\keywordfalse{false}
+
+\parseargdef\allowcodebreaks{%
+  \def\txiarg{#1}%
+  \ifx\txiarg\keywordtrue
+    \allowcodebreakstrue
+  \else\ifx\txiarg\keywordfalse
+    \allowcodebreaksfalse
+  \else
+    \errhelp = \EMsimple
+    \errmessage{Unknown @allowcodebreaks option `\txiarg'}%
+  \fi\fi
+}
+
+% @kbd is like @code, except that if the argument is just one @key command,
+% then @kbd has no effect.
+
+% @kbdinputstyle -- arg is `distinct' (@kbd uses slanted tty font always),
+%   `example' (@kbd uses ttsl only inside of @example and friends),
+%   or `code' (@kbd uses normal tty font always).
+\parseargdef\kbdinputstyle{%
+  \def\txiarg{#1}%
+  \ifx\txiarg\worddistinct
+    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\ttsl}\gdef\kbdfont{\ttsl}%
+  \else\ifx\txiarg\wordexample
+    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\ttsl}\gdef\kbdfont{\tt}%
+  \else\ifx\txiarg\wordcode
+    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\tt}\gdef\kbdfont{\tt}%
+  \else
+    \errhelp = \EMsimple
+    \errmessage{Unknown @kbdinputstyle option `\txiarg'}%
+  \fi\fi\fi
+}
+\def\worddistinct{distinct}
+\def\wordexample{example}
+\def\wordcode{code}
+
+% Default is `distinct.'
+\kbdinputstyle distinct
+
+\def\xkey{\key}
+\def\kbdfoo#1#2#3\par{\def\one{#1}\def\three{#3}\def\threex{??}%
+\ifx\one\xkey\ifx\threex\three \key{#2}%
+\else{\tclose{\kbdfont\look}}\fi
+\else{\tclose{\kbdfont\look}}\fi}
+
+% For @indicateurl, @env, @command quotes seem unnecessary, so use \code.
+\let\indicateurl=\code
+\let\env=\code
+\let\command=\code
+
+% @clicksequence{File @click{} Open ...}
+\def\clicksequence#1{\begingroup #1\endgroup}
+
+% @clickstyle @arrow   (by default)
+\parseargdef\clickstyle{\def\click{#1}}
+\def\click{\arrow}
+
+% @uref (abbreviation for `urlref') takes an optional (comma-separated)
+% second argument specifying the text to display and an optional third
+% arg as text to display instead of (rather than in addition to) the url
+% itself.  First (mandatory) arg is the url.  Perhaps eventually put in
+% a hypertex \special here.
+%
+\def\uref#1{\douref #1,,,\finish}
+\def\douref#1,#2,#3,#4\finish{\begingroup
+  \unsepspaces
+  \pdfurl{#1}%
+  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #3}%
+  \ifdim\wd0 > 0pt
+    \unhbox0 % third arg given, show only that
+  \else
+    \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}%
+    \ifdim\wd0 > 0pt
+      \ifpdf
+        \unhbox0             % PDF: 2nd arg given, show only it
+      \else
+        \unhbox0\ (\code{#1})% DVI: 2nd arg given, show both it and url
+      \fi
+    \else
+      \code{#1}% only url given, so show it
+    \fi
+  \fi
+  \endlink
+\endgroup}
+
+% @url synonym for @uref, since that's how everyone uses it.
+%
+\let\url=\uref
+
+% rms does not like angle brackets --karl, 17may97.
+% So now @email is just like @uref, unless we are pdf.
+%
+%\def\email#1{\angleleft{\tt #1}\angleright}
+\ifpdf
+  \def\email#1{\doemail#1,,\finish}
+  \def\doemail#1,#2,#3\finish{\begingroup
+    \unsepspaces
+    \pdfurl{mailto:#1}%
+    \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}%
+    \ifdim\wd0>0pt\unhbox0\else\code{#1}\fi
+    \endlink
+  \endgroup}
+\else
+  \let\email=\uref
+\fi
+
+% Check if we are currently using a typewriter font.  Since all the
+% Computer Modern typewriter fonts have zero interword stretch (and
+% shrink), and it is reasonable to expect all typewriter fonts to have
+% this property, we can check that font parameter.
+%
+\def\ifmonospace{\ifdim\fontdimen3\font=0pt }
+
+% Typeset a dimension, e.g., `in' or `pt'.  The only reason for the
+% argument is to make the input look right: @dmn{pt} instead of @dmn{}pt.
+%
+\def\dmn#1{\thinspace #1}
+
+\def\kbd#1{\def\look{#1}\expandafter\kbdfoo\look??\par}
+
+% @l was never documented to mean ``switch to the Lisp font'',
+% and it is not used as such in any manual I can find.  We need it for
+% Polish suppressed-l.  --karl, 22sep96.
+%\def\l#1{{\li #1}\null}
+
+% Explicit font changes: @r, @sc, undocumented @ii.
+\def\r#1{{\rm #1}}              % roman font
+\def\sc#1{{\smallcaps#1}}       % smallcaps font
+\def\ii#1{{\it #1}}             % italic font
+
+% @acronym for "FBI", "NATO", and the like.
+% We print this one point size smaller, since it's intended for
+% all-uppercase.
+% 
+\def\acronym#1{\doacronym #1,,\finish}
+\def\doacronym#1,#2,#3\finish{%
+  {\selectfonts\lsize #1}%
+  \def\temp{#2}%
+  \ifx\temp\empty \else
+    \space ({\unsepspaces \ignorespaces \temp \unskip})%
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @abbr for "Comput. J." and the like.
+% No font change, but don't do end-of-sentence spacing.
+% 
+\def\abbr#1{\doabbr #1,,\finish}
+\def\doabbr#1,#2,#3\finish{%
+  {\plainfrenchspacing #1}%
+  \def\temp{#2}%
+  \ifx\temp\empty \else
+    \space ({\unsepspaces \ignorespaces \temp \unskip})%
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @pounds{} is a sterling sign, which Knuth put in the CM italic font.
+%
+\def\pounds{{\it\$}}
+
+% @euro{} comes from a separate font, depending on the current style.
+% We use the free feym* fonts from the eurosym package by Henrik
+% Theiling, which support regular, slanted, bold and bold slanted (and
+% "outlined" (blackboard board, sort of) versions, which we don't need).
+% It is available from http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/eurosym.
+% 
+% Although only regular is the truly official Euro symbol, we ignore
+% that.  The Euro is designed to be slightly taller than the regular
+% font height.
+% 
+% feymr - regular
+% feymo - slanted
+% feybr - bold
+% feybo - bold slanted
+% 
+% There is no good (free) typewriter version, to my knowledge.
+% A feymr10 euro is ~7.3pt wide, while a normal cmtt10 char is ~5.25pt wide.
+% Hmm.
+% 
+% Also doesn't work in math.  Do we need to do math with euro symbols?
+% Hope not.
+% 
+% 
+\def\euro{{\eurofont e}}
+\def\eurofont{%
+  % We set the font at each command, rather than predefining it in
+  % \textfonts and the other font-switching commands, so that
+  % installations which never need the symbol don't have to have the
+  % font installed.
+  % 
+  % There is only one designed size (nominal 10pt), so we always scale
+  % that to the current nominal size.
+  % 
+  % By the way, simply using "at 1em" works for cmr10 and the like, but
+  % does not work for cmbx10 and other extended/shrunken fonts.
+  % 
+  \def\eurosize{\csname\curfontsize nominalsize\endcsname}%
+  %
+  \ifx\curfontstyle\bfstylename 
+    % bold:
+    \font\thiseurofont = \ifusingit{feybo10}{feybr10} at \eurosize
+  \else 
+    % regular:
+    \font\thiseurofont = \ifusingit{feymo10}{feymr10} at \eurosize
+  \fi
+  \thiseurofont
+}
+
+% Hacks for glyphs from the EC fonts similar to \euro.  We don't
+% use \let for the aliases, because sometimes we redefine the original
+% macro, and the alias should reflect the redefinition.
+\def\guillemetleft{{\ecfont \char"13}}
+\def\guillemotleft{\guillemetleft}
+\def\guillemetright{{\ecfont \char"14}}
+\def\guillemotright{\guillemetright}
+\def\guilsinglleft{{\ecfont \char"0E}}
+\def\guilsinglright{{\ecfont \char"0F}}
+\def\quotedblbase{{\ecfont \char"12}}
+\def\quotesinglbase{{\ecfont \char"0D}}
+%
+\def\ecfont{%
+  % We can't distinguish serif/sanserif and italic/slanted, but this
+  % is used for crude hacks anyway (like adding French and German
+  % quotes to documents typeset with CM, where we lose kerning), so
+  % hopefully nobody will notice/care.
+  \edef\ecsize{\csname\curfontsize ecsize\endcsname}%
+  \edef\nominalsize{\csname\curfontsize nominalsize\endcsname}%
+  \ifx\curfontstyle\bfstylename
+    % bold:
+    \font\thisecfont = ecb\ifusingit{i}{x}\ecsize \space at \nominalsize
+  \else
+    % regular:
+    \font\thisecfont = ec\ifusingit{ti}{rm}\ecsize \space at \nominalsize
+  \fi
+  \thisecfont
+}
+
+% @registeredsymbol - R in a circle.  The font for the R should really
+% be smaller yet, but lllsize is the best we can do for now.
+% Adapted from the plain.tex definition of \copyright.
+%
+\def\registeredsymbol{%
+  $^{{\ooalign{\hfil\raise.07ex\hbox{\selectfonts\lllsize R}%
+               \hfil\crcr\Orb}}%
+    }$%
+}
+
+% @textdegree - the normal degrees sign.
+%
+\def\textdegree{$^\circ$}
+
+% Laurent Siebenmann reports \Orb undefined with:
+%  Textures 1.7.7 (preloaded format=plain 93.10.14)  (68K)  16 APR 2004 02:38
+% so we'll define it if necessary.
+% 
+\ifx\Orb\undefined
+\def\Orb{\mathhexbox20D}
+\fi
+
+% Quotes.
+\chardef\quotedblleft="5C
+\chardef\quotedblright=`\"
+\chardef\quoteleft=`\`
+\chardef\quoteright=`\'
+
+
+\message{page headings,}
+
+\newskip\titlepagetopglue \titlepagetopglue = 1.5in
+\newskip\titlepagebottomglue \titlepagebottomglue = 2pc
+
+% First the title page.  Must do @settitle before @titlepage.
+\newif\ifseenauthor
+\newif\iffinishedtitlepage
+
+% Do an implicit @contents or @shortcontents after @end titlepage if the
+% user says @setcontentsaftertitlepage or @setshortcontentsaftertitlepage.
+%
+\newif\ifsetcontentsaftertitlepage
+ \let\setcontentsaftertitlepage = \setcontentsaftertitlepagetrue
+\newif\ifsetshortcontentsaftertitlepage
+ \let\setshortcontentsaftertitlepage = \setshortcontentsaftertitlepagetrue
+
+\parseargdef\shorttitlepage{\begingroup\hbox{}\vskip 1.5in \chaprm \centerline{#1}%
+        \endgroup\page\hbox{}\page}
+
+\envdef\titlepage{%
+  % Open one extra group, as we want to close it in the middle of \Etitlepage.
+  \begingroup
+    \parindent=0pt \textfonts
+    % Leave some space at the very top of the page.
+    \vglue\titlepagetopglue
+    % No rule at page bottom unless we print one at the top with @title.
+    \finishedtitlepagetrue
+    %
+    % Most title ``pages'' are actually two pages long, with space
+    % at the top of the second.  We don't want the ragged left on the second.
+    \let\oldpage = \page
+    \def\page{%
+      \iffinishedtitlepage\else
+        \finishtitlepage
+      \fi
+      \let\page = \oldpage
+      \page
+      \null
+    }%
+}
+
+\def\Etitlepage{%
+    \iffinishedtitlepage\else
+       \finishtitlepage
+    \fi
+    % It is important to do the page break before ending the group,
+    % because the headline and footline are only empty inside the group.
+    % If we use the new definition of \page, we always get a blank page
+    % after the title page, which we certainly don't want.
+    \oldpage
+  \endgroup
+  %
+  % Need this before the \...aftertitlepage checks so that if they are
+  % in effect the toc pages will come out with page numbers.
+  \HEADINGSon
+  %
+  % If they want short, they certainly want long too.
+  \ifsetshortcontentsaftertitlepage
+    \shortcontents
+    \contents
+    \global\let\shortcontents = \relax
+    \global\let\contents = \relax
+  \fi
+  %
+  \ifsetcontentsaftertitlepage
+    \contents
+    \global\let\contents = \relax
+    \global\let\shortcontents = \relax
+  \fi
+}
+
+\def\finishtitlepage{%
+  \vskip4pt \hrule height 2pt width \hsize
+  \vskip\titlepagebottomglue
+  \finishedtitlepagetrue
+}
+
+%%% Macros to be used within @titlepage:
+
+\let\subtitlerm=\tenrm
+\def\subtitlefont{\subtitlerm \normalbaselineskip = 13pt \normalbaselines}
+
+\def\authorfont{\authorrm \normalbaselineskip = 16pt \normalbaselines
+               \let\tt=\authortt}
+
+\parseargdef\title{%
+  \checkenv\titlepage
+  \leftline{\titlefonts\rm #1}
+  % print a rule at the page bottom also.
+  \finishedtitlepagefalse
+  \vskip4pt \hrule height 4pt width \hsize \vskip4pt
+}
+
+\parseargdef\subtitle{%
+  \checkenv\titlepage
+  {\subtitlefont \rightline{#1}}%
+}
+
+% @author should come last, but may come many times.
+% It can also be used inside @quotation.
+%
+\parseargdef\author{%
+  \def\temp{\quotation}%
+  \ifx\thisenv\temp
+    \def\quotationauthor{#1}% printed in \Equotation.
+  \else
+    \checkenv\titlepage
+    \ifseenauthor\else \vskip 0pt plus 1filll \seenauthortrue \fi
+    {\authorfont \leftline{#1}}%
+  \fi
+}
+
+
+%%% Set up page headings and footings.
+
+\let\thispage=\folio
+
+\newtoks\evenheadline    % headline on even pages
+\newtoks\oddheadline     % headline on odd pages
+\newtoks\evenfootline    % footline on even pages
+\newtoks\oddfootline     % footline on odd pages
+
+% Now make TeX use those variables
+\headline={{\textfonts\rm \ifodd\pageno \the\oddheadline
+                            \else \the\evenheadline \fi}}
+\footline={{\textfonts\rm \ifodd\pageno \the\oddfootline
+                            \else \the\evenfootline \fi}\HEADINGShook}
+\let\HEADINGShook=\relax
+
+% Commands to set those variables.
+% For example, this is what  @headings on  does
+% @evenheading @thistitle|@thispage|@thischapter
+% @oddheading @thischapter|@thispage|@thistitle
+% @evenfooting @thisfile||
+% @oddfooting ||@thisfile
+
+
+\def\evenheading{\parsearg\evenheadingxxx}
+\def\evenheadingxxx #1{\evenheadingyyy #1\|\|\|\|\finish}
+\def\evenheadingyyy #1\|#2\|#3\|#4\finish{%
+\global\evenheadline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
+
+\def\oddheading{\parsearg\oddheadingxxx}
+\def\oddheadingxxx #1{\oddheadingyyy #1\|\|\|\|\finish}
+\def\oddheadingyyy #1\|#2\|#3\|#4\finish{%
+\global\oddheadline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
+
+\parseargdef\everyheading{\oddheadingxxx{#1}\evenheadingxxx{#1}}%
+
+\def\evenfooting{\parsearg\evenfootingxxx}
+\def\evenfootingxxx #1{\evenfootingyyy #1\|\|\|\|\finish}
+\def\evenfootingyyy #1\|#2\|#3\|#4\finish{%
+\global\evenfootline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
+
+\def\oddfooting{\parsearg\oddfootingxxx}
+\def\oddfootingxxx #1{\oddfootingyyy #1\|\|\|\|\finish}
+\def\oddfootingyyy #1\|#2\|#3\|#4\finish{%
+  \global\oddfootline = {\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}%
+  %
+  % Leave some space for the footline.  Hopefully ok to assume
+  % @evenfooting will not be used by itself.
+  \global\advance\pageheight by -12pt
+  \global\advance\vsize by -12pt
+}
+
+\parseargdef\everyfooting{\oddfootingxxx{#1}\evenfootingxxx{#1}}
+
+% @evenheadingmarks top     \thischapter <- chapter at the top of a page
+% @evenheadingmarks bottom  \thischapter <- chapter at the bottom of a page
+%
+% The same set of arguments for:
+%
+% @oddheadingmarks
+% @evenfootingmarks
+% @oddfootingmarks
+% @everyheadingmarks
+% @everyfootingmarks
+
+\def\evenheadingmarks{\headingmarks{even}{heading}}
+\def\oddheadingmarks{\headingmarks{odd}{heading}}
+\def\evenfootingmarks{\headingmarks{even}{footing}}
+\def\oddfootingmarks{\headingmarks{odd}{footing}}
+\def\everyheadingmarks#1 {\headingmarks{even}{heading}{#1}
+                          \headingmarks{odd}{heading}{#1} }
+\def\everyfootingmarks#1 {\headingmarks{even}{footing}{#1}
+                          \headingmarks{odd}{footing}{#1} }
+% #1 = even/odd, #2 = heading/footing, #3 = top/bottom.
+\def\headingmarks#1#2#3 {%
+  \expandafter\let\expandafter\temp \csname get#3headingmarks\endcsname
+  \global\expandafter\let\csname get#1#2marks\endcsname \temp
+}
+
+\everyheadingmarks bottom
+\everyfootingmarks bottom
+
+% @headings double      turns headings on for double-sided printing.
+% @headings single      turns headings on for single-sided printing.
+% @headings off         turns them off.
+% @headings on          same as @headings double, retained for compatibility.
+% @headings after       turns on double-sided headings after this page.
+% @headings doubleafter turns on double-sided headings after this page.
+% @headings singleafter turns on single-sided headings after this page.
+% By default, they are off at the start of a document,
+% and turned `on' after @end titlepage.
+
+\def\headings #1 {\csname HEADINGS#1\endcsname}
+
+\def\HEADINGSoff{%
+\global\evenheadline={\hfil} \global\evenfootline={\hfil}
+\global\oddheadline={\hfil} \global\oddfootline={\hfil}}
+\HEADINGSoff
+% When we turn headings on, set the page number to 1.
+% For double-sided printing, put current file name in lower left corner,
+% chapter name on inside top of right hand pages, document
+% title on inside top of left hand pages, and page numbers on outside top
+% edge of all pages.
+\def\HEADINGSdouble{%
+\global\pageno=1
+\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
+\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
+\global\evenheadline={\line{\folio\hfil\thistitle}}
+\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chapoddpage
+}
+\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
+
+% For single-sided printing, chapter title goes across top left of page,
+% page number on top right.
+\def\HEADINGSsingle{%
+\global\pageno=1
+\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
+\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
+\global\evenheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
+}
+\def\HEADINGSon{\HEADINGSdouble}
+
+\def\HEADINGSafter{\let\HEADINGShook=\HEADINGSdoublex}
+\let\HEADINGSdoubleafter=\HEADINGSafter
+\def\HEADINGSdoublex{%
+\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
+\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
+\global\evenheadline={\line{\folio\hfil\thistitle}}
+\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chapoddpage
+}
+
+\def\HEADINGSsingleafter{\let\HEADINGShook=\HEADINGSsinglex}
+\def\HEADINGSsinglex{%
+\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
+\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
+\global\evenheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
+\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
+}
+
+% Subroutines used in generating headings
+% This produces Day Month Year style of output.
+% Only define if not already defined, in case a txi-??.tex file has set
+% up a different format (e.g., txi-cs.tex does this).
+\ifx\today\undefined
+\def\today{%
+  \number\day\space
+  \ifcase\month
+  \or\putwordMJan\or\putwordMFeb\or\putwordMMar\or\putwordMApr
+  \or\putwordMMay\or\putwordMJun\or\putwordMJul\or\putwordMAug
+  \or\putwordMSep\or\putwordMOct\or\putwordMNov\or\putwordMDec
+  \fi
+  \space\number\year}
+\fi
+
+% @settitle line...  specifies the title of the document, for headings.
+% It generates no output of its own.
+\def\thistitle{\putwordNoTitle}
+\def\settitle{\parsearg{\gdef\thistitle}}
+
+
+\message{tables,}
+% Tables -- @table, @ftable, @vtable, @item(x).
+
+% default indentation of table text
+\newdimen\tableindent \tableindent=.8in
+% default indentation of @itemize and @enumerate text
+\newdimen\itemindent  \itemindent=.3in
+% margin between end of table item and start of table text.
+\newdimen\itemmargin  \itemmargin=.1in
+
+% used internally for \itemindent minus \itemmargin
+\newdimen\itemmax
+
+% Note @table, @ftable, and @vtable define @item, @itemx, etc., with
+% these defs.
+% They also define \itemindex
+% to index the item name in whatever manner is desired (perhaps none).
+
+\newif\ifitemxneedsnegativevskip
+
+\def\itemxpar{\par\ifitemxneedsnegativevskip\nobreak\vskip-\parskip\nobreak\fi}
+
+\def\internalBitem{\smallbreak \parsearg\itemzzz}
+\def\internalBitemx{\itemxpar \parsearg\itemzzz}
+
+\def\itemzzz #1{\begingroup %
+  \advance\hsize by -\rightskip
+  \advance\hsize by -\tableindent
+  \setbox0=\hbox{\itemindicate{#1}}%
+  \itemindex{#1}%
+  \nobreak % This prevents a break before @itemx.
+  %
+  % If the item text does not fit in the space we have, put it on a line
+  % by itself, and do not allow a page break either before or after that
+  % line.  We do not start a paragraph here because then if the next
+  % command is, e.g., @kindex, the whatsit would get put into the
+  % horizontal list on a line by itself, resulting in extra blank space.
+  \ifdim \wd0>\itemmax
+    %
+    % Make this a paragraph so we get the \parskip glue and wrapping,
+    % but leave it ragged-right.
+    \begingroup
+      \advance\leftskip by-\tableindent
+      \advance\hsize by\tableindent
+      \advance\rightskip by0pt plus1fil
+      \leavevmode\unhbox0\par
+    \endgroup
+    %
+    % We're going to be starting a paragraph, but we don't want the
+    % \parskip glue -- logically it's part of the @item we just started.
+    \nobreak \vskip-\parskip
+    %
+    % Stop a page break at the \parskip glue coming up.  However, if
+    % what follows is an environment such as @example, there will be no
+    % \parskip glue; then the negative vskip we just inserted would
+    % cause the example and the item to crash together.  So we use this
+    % bizarre value of 10001 as a signal to \aboveenvbreak to insert
+    % \parskip glue after all.  Section titles are handled this way also.
+    % 
+    \penalty 10001
+    \endgroup
+    \itemxneedsnegativevskipfalse
+  \else
+    % The item text fits into the space.  Start a paragraph, so that the
+    % following text (if any) will end up on the same line.
+    \noindent
+    % Do this with kerns and \unhbox so that if there is a footnote in
+    % the item text, it can migrate to the main vertical list and
+    % eventually be printed.
+    \nobreak\kern-\tableindent
+    \dimen0 = \itemmax  \advance\dimen0 by \itemmargin \advance\dimen0 by -\wd0
+    \unhbox0
+    \nobreak\kern\dimen0
+    \endgroup
+    \itemxneedsnegativevskiptrue
+  \fi
+}
+
+\def\item{\errmessage{@item while not in a list environment}}
+\def\itemx{\errmessage{@itemx while not in a list environment}}
+
+% @table, @ftable, @vtable.
+\envdef\table{%
+  \let\itemindex\gobble
+  \tablecheck{table}%
+}
+\envdef\ftable{%
+  \def\itemindex ##1{\doind {fn}{\code{##1}}}%
+  \tablecheck{ftable}%
+}
+\envdef\vtable{%
+  \def\itemindex ##1{\doind {vr}{\code{##1}}}%
+  \tablecheck{vtable}%
+}
+\def\tablecheck#1{%
+  \ifnum \the\catcode`\^^M=\active
+    \endgroup
+    \errmessage{This command won't work in this context; perhaps the problem is
+      that we are \inenvironment\thisenv}%
+    \def\next{\doignore{#1}}%
+  \else
+    \let\next\tablex
+  \fi
+  \next
+}
+\def\tablex#1{%
+  \def\itemindicate{#1}%
+  \parsearg\tabley
+}
+\def\tabley#1{%
+  {%
+    \makevalueexpandable
+    \edef\temp{\noexpand\tablez #1\space\space\space}%
+    \expandafter
+  }\temp \endtablez
+}
+\def\tablez #1 #2 #3 #4\endtablez{%
+  \aboveenvbreak
+  \ifnum 0#1>0 \advance \leftskip by #1\mil \fi
+  \ifnum 0#2>0 \tableindent=#2\mil \fi
+  \ifnum 0#3>0 \advance \rightskip by #3\mil \fi
+  \itemmax=\tableindent
+  \advance \itemmax by -\itemmargin
+  \advance \leftskip by \tableindent
+  \exdentamount=\tableindent
+  \parindent = 0pt
+  \parskip = \smallskipamount
+  \ifdim \parskip=0pt \parskip=2pt \fi
+  \let\item = \internalBitem
+  \let\itemx = \internalBitemx
+}
+\def\Etable{\endgraf\afterenvbreak}
+\let\Eftable\Etable
+\let\Evtable\Etable
+\let\Eitemize\Etable
+\let\Eenumerate\Etable
+
+% This is the counter used by @enumerate, which is really @itemize
+
+\newcount \itemno
+
+\envdef\itemize{\parsearg\doitemize}
+
+\def\doitemize#1{%
+  \aboveenvbreak
+  \itemmax=\itemindent
+  \advance\itemmax by -\itemmargin
+  \advance\leftskip by \itemindent
+  \exdentamount=\itemindent
+  \parindent=0pt
+  \parskip=\smallskipamount
+  \ifdim\parskip=0pt \parskip=2pt \fi
+  \def\itemcontents{#1}%
+  % @itemize with no arg is equivalent to @itemize @bullet.
+  \ifx\itemcontents\empty\def\itemcontents{\bullet}\fi
+  \let\item=\itemizeitem
+}
+
+% Definition of @item while inside @itemize and @enumerate.
+%
+\def\itemizeitem{%
+  \advance\itemno by 1  % for enumerations
+  {\let\par=\endgraf \smallbreak}% reasonable place to break
+  {%
+   % If the document has an @itemize directly after a section title, a
+   % \nobreak will be last on the list, and \sectionheading will have
+   % done a \vskip-\parskip.  In that case, we don't want to zero
+   % parskip, or the item text will crash with the heading.  On the
+   % other hand, when there is normal text preceding the item (as there
+   % usually is), we do want to zero parskip, or there would be too much
+   % space.  In that case, we won't have a \nobreak before.  At least
+   % that's the theory.
+   \ifnum\lastpenalty<10000 \parskip=0in \fi
+   \noindent
+   \hbox to 0pt{\hss \itemcontents \kern\itemmargin}%
+   \vadjust{\penalty 1200}}% not good to break after first line of item.
+  \flushcr
+}
+
+% \splitoff TOKENS\endmark defines \first to be the first token in
+% TOKENS, and \rest to be the remainder.
+%
+\def\splitoff#1#2\endmark{\def\first{#1}\def\rest{#2}}%
+
+% Allow an optional argument of an uppercase letter, lowercase letter,
+% or number, to specify the first label in the enumerated list.  No
+% argument is the same as `1'.
+%
+\envparseargdef\enumerate{\enumeratey #1  \endenumeratey}
+\def\enumeratey #1 #2\endenumeratey{%
+  % If we were given no argument, pretend we were given `1'.
+  \def\thearg{#1}%
+  \ifx\thearg\empty \def\thearg{1}\fi
+  %
+  % Detect if the argument is a single token.  If so, it might be a
+  % letter.  Otherwise, the only valid thing it can be is a number.
+  % (We will always have one token, because of the test we just made.
+  % This is a good thing, since \splitoff doesn't work given nothing at
+  % all -- the first parameter is undelimited.)
+  \expandafter\splitoff\thearg\endmark
+  \ifx\rest\empty
+    % Only one token in the argument.  It could still be anything.
+    % A ``lowercase letter'' is one whose \lccode is nonzero.
+    % An ``uppercase letter'' is one whose \lccode is both nonzero, and
+    %   not equal to itself.
+    % Otherwise, we assume it's a number.
+    %
+    % We need the \relax at the end of the \ifnum lines to stop TeX from
+    % continuing to look for a <number>.
+    %
+    \ifnum\lccode\expandafter`\thearg=0\relax
+      \numericenumerate % a number (we hope)
+    \else
+      % It's a letter.
+      \ifnum\lccode\expandafter`\thearg=\expandafter`\thearg\relax
+        \lowercaseenumerate % lowercase letter
+      \else
+        \uppercaseenumerate % uppercase letter
+      \fi
+    \fi
+  \else
+    % Multiple tokens in the argument.  We hope it's a number.
+    \numericenumerate
+  \fi
+}
+
+% An @enumerate whose labels are integers.  The starting integer is
+% given in \thearg.
+%
+\def\numericenumerate{%
+  \itemno = \thearg
+  \startenumeration{\the\itemno}%
+}
+
+% The starting (lowercase) letter is in \thearg.
+\def\lowercaseenumerate{%
+  \itemno = \expandafter`\thearg
+  \startenumeration{%
+    % Be sure we're not beyond the end of the alphabet.
+    \ifnum\itemno=0
+      \errmessage{No more lowercase letters in @enumerate; get a bigger
+                  alphabet}%
+    \fi
+    \char\lccode\itemno
+  }%
+}
+
+% The starting (uppercase) letter is in \thearg.
+\def\uppercaseenumerate{%
+  \itemno = \expandafter`\thearg
+  \startenumeration{%
+    % Be sure we're not beyond the end of the alphabet.
+    \ifnum\itemno=0
+      \errmessage{No more uppercase letters in @enumerate; get a bigger
+                  alphabet}
+    \fi
+    \char\uccode\itemno
+  }%
+}
+
+% Call \doitemize, adding a period to the first argument and supplying the
+% common last two arguments.  Also subtract one from the initial value in
+% \itemno, since @item increments \itemno.
+%
+\def\startenumeration#1{%
+  \advance\itemno by -1
+  \doitemize{#1.}\flushcr
+}
+
+% @alphaenumerate and @capsenumerate are abbreviations for giving an arg
+% to @enumerate.
+%
+\def\alphaenumerate{\enumerate{a}}
+\def\capsenumerate{\enumerate{A}}
+\def\Ealphaenumerate{\Eenumerate}
+\def\Ecapsenumerate{\Eenumerate}
+
+
+% @multitable macros
+% Amy Hendrickson, 8/18/94, 3/6/96
+%
+% @multitable ... @end multitable will make as many columns as desired.
+% Contents of each column will wrap at width given in preamble.  Width
+% can be specified either with sample text given in a template line,
+% or in percent of \hsize, the current width of text on page.
+
+% Table can continue over pages but will only break between lines.
+
+% To make preamble:
+%
+% Either define widths of columns in terms of percent of \hsize:
+%   @multitable @columnfractions .25 .3 .45
+%   @item ...
+%
+%   Numbers following @columnfractions are the percent of the total
+%   current hsize to be used for each column. You may use as many
+%   columns as desired.
+
+
+% Or use a template:
+%   @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template} {Column 3 template}
+%   @item ...
+%   using the widest term desired in each column.
+
+% Each new table line starts with @item, each subsequent new column
+% starts with @tab. Empty columns may be produced by supplying @tab's
+% with nothing between them for as many times as empty columns are needed,
+% ie, @tab@tab@tab will produce two empty columns.
+
+% @item, @tab do not need to be on their own lines, but it will not hurt
+% if they are.
+
+% Sample multitable:
+
+%   @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template} {Column 3 template}
+%   @item first col stuff @tab second col stuff @tab third col
+%   @item
+%   first col stuff
+%   @tab
+%   second col stuff
+%   @tab
+%   third col
+%   @item first col stuff @tab second col stuff
+%   @tab Many paragraphs of text may be used in any column.
+%
+%         They will wrap at the width determined by the template.
+%   @item@tab@tab This will be in third column.
+%   @end multitable
+
+% Default dimensions may be reset by user.
+% @multitableparskip is vertical space between paragraphs in table.
+% @multitableparindent is paragraph indent in table.
+% @multitablecolmargin is horizontal space to be left between columns.
+% @multitablelinespace is space to leave between table items, baseline
+%                                                            to baseline.
+%   0pt means it depends on current normal line spacing.
+%
+\newskip\multitableparskip
+\newskip\multitableparindent
+\newdimen\multitablecolspace
+\newskip\multitablelinespace
+\multitableparskip=0pt
+\multitableparindent=6pt
+\multitablecolspace=12pt
+\multitablelinespace=0pt
+
+% Macros used to set up halign preamble:
+%
+\let\endsetuptable\relax
+\def\xendsetuptable{\endsetuptable}
+\let\columnfractions\relax
+\def\xcolumnfractions{\columnfractions}
+\newif\ifsetpercent
+
+% #1 is the @columnfraction, usually a decimal number like .5, but might
+% be just 1.  We just use it, whatever it is.
+%
+\def\pickupwholefraction#1 {%
+  \global\advance\colcount by 1
+  \expandafter\xdef\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname{#1\hsize}%
+  \setuptable
+}
+
+\newcount\colcount
+\def\setuptable#1{%
+  \def\firstarg{#1}%
+  \ifx\firstarg\xendsetuptable
+    \let\go = \relax
+  \else
+    \ifx\firstarg\xcolumnfractions
+      \global\setpercenttrue
+    \else
+      \ifsetpercent
+         \let\go\pickupwholefraction
+      \else
+         \global\advance\colcount by 1
+         \setbox0=\hbox{#1\unskip\space}% Add a normal word space as a
+                   % separator; typically that is always in the input, anyway.
+         \expandafter\xdef\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname{\the\wd0}%
+      \fi
+    \fi
+    \ifx\go\pickupwholefraction
+      % Put the argument back for the \pickupwholefraction call, so
+      % we'll always have a period there to be parsed.
+      \def\go{\pickupwholefraction#1}%
+    \else
+      \let\go = \setuptable
+    \fi%
+  \fi
+  \go
+}
+
+% multitable-only commands.
+%
+% @headitem starts a heading row, which we typeset in bold.
+% Assignments have to be global since we are inside the implicit group
+% of an alignment entry.  Note that \everycr resets \everytab.
+\def\headitem{\checkenv\multitable \crcr \global\everytab={\bf}\the\everytab}%
+%
+% A \tab used to include \hskip1sp.  But then the space in a template
+% line is not enough.  That is bad.  So let's go back to just `&' until
+% we encounter the problem it was intended to solve again.
+%                                      --karl, nathan@acm.org, 20apr99.
+\def\tab{\checkenv\multitable &\the\everytab}%
+
+% @multitable ... @end multitable definitions:
+%
+\newtoks\everytab  % insert after every tab.
+%
+\envdef\multitable{%
+  \vskip\parskip
+  \startsavinginserts
+  %
+  % @item within a multitable starts a normal row.
+  % We use \def instead of \let so that if one of the multitable entries
+  % contains an @itemize, we don't choke on the \item (seen as \crcr aka
+  % \endtemplate) expanding \doitemize.
+  \def\item{\crcr}%
+  %
+  \tolerance=9500
+  \hbadness=9500
+  \setmultitablespacing
+  \parskip=\multitableparskip
+  \parindent=\multitableparindent
+  \overfullrule=0pt
+  \global\colcount=0
+  %
+  \everycr = {%
+    \noalign{%
+      \global\everytab={}%
+      \global\colcount=0 % Reset the column counter.
+      % Check for saved footnotes, etc.
+      \checkinserts
+      % Keeps underfull box messages off when table breaks over pages.
+      %\filbreak
+       % Maybe so, but it also creates really weird page breaks when the
+       % table breaks over pages. Wouldn't \vfil be better?  Wait until the
+       % problem manifests itself, so it can be fixed for real --karl.
+    }%
+  }%
+  %
+  \parsearg\domultitable
+}
+\def\domultitable#1{%
+  % To parse everything between @multitable and @item:
+  \setuptable#1 \endsetuptable
+  %
+  % This preamble sets up a generic column definition, which will
+  % be used as many times as user calls for columns.
+  % \vtop will set a single line and will also let text wrap and
+  % continue for many paragraphs if desired.
+  \halign\bgroup &%
+    \global\advance\colcount by 1
+    \multistrut
+    \vtop{%
+      % Use the current \colcount to find the correct column width:
+      \hsize=\expandafter\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname
+      %
+      % In order to keep entries from bumping into each other
+      % we will add a \leftskip of \multitablecolspace to all columns after
+      % the first one.
+      %
+      % If a template has been used, we will add \multitablecolspace
+      % to the width of each template entry.
+      %
+      % If the user has set preamble in terms of percent of \hsize we will
+      % use that dimension as the width of the column, and the \leftskip
+      % will keep entries from bumping into each other.  Table will start at
+      % left margin and final column will justify at right margin.
+      %
+      % Make sure we don't inherit \rightskip from the outer environment.
+      \rightskip=0pt
+      \ifnum\colcount=1
+       % The first column will be indented with the surrounding text.
+       \advance\hsize by\leftskip
+      \else
+       \ifsetpercent \else
+         % If user has not set preamble in terms of percent of \hsize
+         % we will advance \hsize by \multitablecolspace.
+         \advance\hsize by \multitablecolspace
+       \fi
+       % In either case we will make \leftskip=\multitablecolspace:
+      \leftskip=\multitablecolspace
+      \fi
+      % Ignoring space at the beginning and end avoids an occasional spurious
+      % blank line, when TeX decides to break the line at the space before the
+      % box from the multistrut, so the strut ends up on a line by itself.
+      % For example:
+      % @multitable @columnfractions .11 .89
+      % @item @code{#}
+      % @tab Legal holiday which is valid in major parts of the whole country.
+      % Is automatically provided with highlighting sequences respectively
+      % marking characters.
+      \noindent\ignorespaces##\unskip\multistrut
+    }\cr
+}
+\def\Emultitable{%
+  \crcr
+  \egroup % end the \halign
+  \global\setpercentfalse
+}
+
+\def\setmultitablespacing{%
+  \def\multistrut{\strut}% just use the standard line spacing
+  %
+  % Compute \multitablelinespace (if not defined by user) for use in
+  % \multitableparskip calculation.  We used define \multistrut based on
+  % this, but (ironically) that caused the spacing to be off.
+  % See bug-texinfo report from Werner Lemberg, 31 Oct 2004 12:52:20 +0100.
+\ifdim\multitablelinespace=0pt
+\setbox0=\vbox{X}\global\multitablelinespace=\the\baselineskip
+\global\advance\multitablelinespace by-\ht0
+\fi
+%% Test to see if parskip is larger than space between lines of
+%% table. If not, do nothing.
+%%        If so, set to same dimension as multitablelinespace.
+\ifdim\multitableparskip>\multitablelinespace
+\global\multitableparskip=\multitablelinespace
+\global\advance\multitableparskip-7pt %% to keep parskip somewhat smaller
+                                      %% than skip between lines in the table.
+\fi%
+\ifdim\multitableparskip=0pt
+\global\multitableparskip=\multitablelinespace
+\global\advance\multitableparskip-7pt %% to keep parskip somewhat smaller
+                                      %% than skip between lines in the table.
+\fi}
+
+
+\message{conditionals,}
+
+% @iftex, @ifnotdocbook, @ifnothtml, @ifnotinfo, @ifnotplaintext,
+% @ifnotxml always succeed.  They currently do nothing; we don't
+% attempt to check whether the conditionals are properly nested.  But we
+% have to remember that they are conditionals, so that @end doesn't
+% attempt to close an environment group.
+%
+\def\makecond#1{%
+  \expandafter\let\csname #1\endcsname = \relax
+  \expandafter\let\csname iscond.#1\endcsname = 1
+}
+\makecond{iftex}
+\makecond{ifnotdocbook}
+\makecond{ifnothtml}
+\makecond{ifnotinfo}
+\makecond{ifnotplaintext}
+\makecond{ifnotxml}
+
+% Ignore @ignore, @ifhtml, @ifinfo, and the like.
+%
+\def\direntry{\doignore{direntry}}
+\def\documentdescription{\doignore{documentdescription}}
+\def\docbook{\doignore{docbook}}
+\def\html{\doignore{html}}
+\def\ifdocbook{\doignore{ifdocbook}}
+\def\ifhtml{\doignore{ifhtml}}
+\def\ifinfo{\doignore{ifinfo}}
+\def\ifnottex{\doignore{ifnottex}}
+\def\ifplaintext{\doignore{ifplaintext}}
+\def\ifxml{\doignore{ifxml}}
+\def\ignore{\doignore{ignore}}
+\def\menu{\doignore{menu}}
+\def\xml{\doignore{xml}}
+
+% Ignore text until a line `@end #1', keeping track of nested conditionals.
+%
+% A count to remember the depth of nesting.
+\newcount\doignorecount
+
+\def\doignore#1{\begingroup
+  % Scan in ``verbatim'' mode:
+  \obeylines
+  \catcode`\@ = \other
+  \catcode`\{ = \other
+  \catcode`\} = \other
+  %
+  % Make sure that spaces turn into tokens that match what \doignoretext wants.
+  \spaceisspace
+  %
+  % Count number of #1's that we've seen.
+  \doignorecount = 0
+  %
+  % Swallow text until we reach the matching `@end #1'.
+  \dodoignore{#1}%
+}
+
+{ \catcode`_=11 % We want to use \_STOP_ which cannot appear in texinfo source.
+  \obeylines %
+  %
+  \gdef\dodoignore#1{%
+    % #1 contains the command name as a string, e.g., `ifinfo'.
+    %
+    % Define a command to find the next `@end #1'.
+    \long\def\doignoretext##1^^M@end #1{%
+      \doignoretextyyy##1^^M@#1\_STOP_}%
+    %
+    % And this command to find another #1 command, at the beginning of a
+    % line.  (Otherwise, we would consider a line `@c @ifset', for
+    % example, to count as an @ifset for nesting.)
+    \long\def\doignoretextyyy##1^^M@#1##2\_STOP_{\doignoreyyy{##2}\_STOP_}%
+    %
+    % And now expand that command.
+    \doignoretext ^^M%
+  }%
+}
+
+\def\doignoreyyy#1{%
+  \def\temp{#1}%
+  \ifx\temp\empty                      % Nothing found.
+    \let\next\doignoretextzzz
+  \else                                        % Found a nested condition, ...
+    \advance\doignorecount by 1
+    \let\next\doignoretextyyy          % ..., look for another.
+    % If we're here, #1 ends with ^^M\ifinfo (for example).
+  \fi
+  \next #1% the token \_STOP_ is present just after this macro.
+}
+
+% We have to swallow the remaining "\_STOP_".
+%
+\def\doignoretextzzz#1{%
+  \ifnum\doignorecount = 0     % We have just found the outermost @end.
+    \let\next\enddoignore
+  \else                                % Still inside a nested condition.
+    \advance\doignorecount by -1
+    \let\next\doignoretext      % Look for the next @end.
+  \fi
+  \next
+}
+
+% Finish off ignored text.
+{ \obeylines%
+  % Ignore anything after the last `@end #1'; this matters in verbatim
+  % environments, where otherwise the newline after an ignored conditional
+  % would result in a blank line in the output.
+  \gdef\enddoignore#1^^M{\endgroup\ignorespaces}%
+}
+
+
+% @set VAR sets the variable VAR to an empty value.
+% @set VAR REST-OF-LINE sets VAR to the value REST-OF-LINE.
+%
+% Since we want to separate VAR from REST-OF-LINE (which might be
+% empty), we can't just use \parsearg; we have to insert a space of our
+% own to delimit the rest of the line, and then take it out again if we
+% didn't need it.
+% We rely on the fact that \parsearg sets \catcode`\ =10.
+%
+\parseargdef\set{\setyyy#1 \endsetyyy}
+\def\setyyy#1 #2\endsetyyy{%
+  {%
+    \makevalueexpandable
+    \def\temp{#2}%
+    \edef\next{\gdef\makecsname{SET#1}}%
+    \ifx\temp\empty
+      \next{}%
+    \else
+      \setzzz#2\endsetzzz
+    \fi
+  }%
+}
+% Remove the trailing space \setxxx inserted.
+\def\setzzz#1 \endsetzzz{\next{#1}}
+
+% @clear VAR clears (i.e., unsets) the variable VAR.
+%
+\parseargdef\clear{%
+  {%
+    \makevalueexpandable
+    \global\expandafter\let\csname SET#1\endcsname=\relax
+  }%
+}
+
+% @value{foo} gets the text saved in variable foo.
+\def\value{\begingroup\makevalueexpandable\valuexxx}
+\def\valuexxx#1{\expandablevalue{#1}\endgroup}
+{
+  \catcode`\- = \active \catcode`\_ = \active
+  %
+  \gdef\makevalueexpandable{%
+    \let\value = \expandablevalue
+    % We don't want these characters active, ...
+    \catcode`\-=\other \catcode`\_=\other
+    % ..., but we might end up with active ones in the argument if
+    % we're called from @code, as @code{@value{foo-bar_}}, though.
+    % So \let them to their normal equivalents.
+    \let-\realdash \let_\normalunderscore
+  }
+}
+
+% We have this subroutine so that we can handle at least some @value's
+% properly in indexes (we call \makevalueexpandable in \indexdummies).
+% The command has to be fully expandable (if the variable is set), since
+% the result winds up in the index file.  This means that if the
+% variable's value contains other Texinfo commands, it's almost certain
+% it will fail (although perhaps we could fix that with sufficient work
+% to do a one-level expansion on the result, instead of complete).
+%
+\def\expandablevalue#1{%
+  \expandafter\ifx\csname SET#1\endcsname\relax
+    {[No value for ``#1'']}%
+    \message{Variable `#1', used in @value, is not set.}%
+  \else
+    \csname SET#1\endcsname
+  \fi
+}
+
+% @ifset VAR ... @end ifset reads the `...' iff VAR has been defined
+% with @set.
+%
+% To get special treatment of `@end ifset,' call \makeond and the redefine.
+%
+\makecond{ifset}
+\def\ifset{\parsearg{\doifset{\let\next=\ifsetfail}}}
+\def\doifset#1#2{%
+  {%
+    \makevalueexpandable
+    \let\next=\empty
+    \expandafter\ifx\csname SET#2\endcsname\relax
+      #1% If not set, redefine \next.
+    \fi
+    \expandafter
+  }\next
+}
+\def\ifsetfail{\doignore{ifset}}
+
+% @ifclear VAR ... @end ifclear reads the `...' iff VAR has never been
+% defined with @set, or has been undefined with @clear.
+%
+% The `\else' inside the `\doifset' parameter is a trick to reuse the
+% above code: if the variable is not set, do nothing, if it is set,
+% then redefine \next to \ifclearfail.
+%
+\makecond{ifclear}
+\def\ifclear{\parsearg{\doifset{\else \let\next=\ifclearfail}}}
+\def\ifclearfail{\doignore{ifclear}}
+
+% @dircategory CATEGORY  -- specify a category of the dir file
+% which this file should belong to.  Ignore this in TeX.
+\let\dircategory=\comment
+
+% @defininfoenclose.
+\let\definfoenclose=\comment
+
+
+\message{indexing,}
+% Index generation facilities
+
+% Define \newwrite to be identical to plain tex's \newwrite
+% except not \outer, so it can be used within macros and \if's.
+\edef\newwrite{\makecsname{ptexnewwrite}}
+
+% \newindex {foo} defines an index named foo.
+% It automatically defines \fooindex such that
+% \fooindex ...rest of line... puts an entry in the index foo.
+% It also defines \fooindfile to be the number of the output channel for
+% the file that accumulates this index.  The file's extension is foo.
+% The name of an index should be no more than 2 characters long
+% for the sake of vms.
+%
+\def\newindex#1{%
+  \iflinks
+    \expandafter\newwrite \csname#1indfile\endcsname
+    \openout \csname#1indfile\endcsname \jobname.#1 % Open the file
+  \fi
+  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{%     % Define @#1index
+    \noexpand\doindex{#1}}
+}
+
+% @defindex foo  ==  \newindex{foo}
+%
+\def\defindex{\parsearg\newindex}
+
+% Define @defcodeindex, like @defindex except put all entries in @code.
+%
+\def\defcodeindex{\parsearg\newcodeindex}
+%
+\def\newcodeindex#1{%
+  \iflinks
+    \expandafter\newwrite \csname#1indfile\endcsname
+    \openout \csname#1indfile\endcsname \jobname.#1
+  \fi
+  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{%
+    \noexpand\docodeindex{#1}}%
+}
+
+
+% @synindex foo bar    makes index foo feed into index bar.
+% Do this instead of @defindex foo if you don't want it as a separate index.
+%
+% @syncodeindex foo bar   similar, but put all entries made for index foo
+% inside @code.
+%
+\def\synindex#1 #2 {\dosynindex\doindex{#1}{#2}}
+\def\syncodeindex#1 #2 {\dosynindex\docodeindex{#1}{#2}}
+
+% #1 is \doindex or \docodeindex, #2 the index getting redefined (foo),
+% #3 the target index (bar).
+\def\dosynindex#1#2#3{%
+  % Only do \closeout if we haven't already done it, else we'll end up
+  % closing the target index.
+  \expandafter \ifx\csname donesynindex#2\endcsname \undefined
+    % The \closeout helps reduce unnecessary open files; the limit on the
+    % Acorn RISC OS is a mere 16 files.
+    \expandafter\closeout\csname#2indfile\endcsname
+    \expandafter\let\csname\donesynindex#2\endcsname = 1
+  \fi
+  % redefine \fooindfile:
+  \expandafter\let\expandafter\temp\expandafter=\csname#3indfile\endcsname
+  \expandafter\let\csname#2indfile\endcsname=\temp
+  % redefine \fooindex:
+  \expandafter\xdef\csname#2index\endcsname{\noexpand#1{#3}}%
+}
+
+% Define \doindex, the driver for all \fooindex macros.
+% Argument #1 is generated by the calling \fooindex macro,
+%  and it is "foo", the name of the index.
+
+% \doindex just uses \parsearg; it calls \doind for the actual work.
+% This is because \doind is more useful to call from other macros.
+
+% There is also \dosubind {index}{topic}{subtopic}
+% which makes an entry in a two-level index such as the operation index.
+
+\def\doindex#1{\edef\indexname{#1}\parsearg\singleindexer}
+\def\singleindexer #1{\doind{\indexname}{#1}}
+
+% like the previous two, but they put @code around the argument.
+\def\docodeindex#1{\edef\indexname{#1}\parsearg\singlecodeindexer}
+\def\singlecodeindexer #1{\doind{\indexname}{\code{#1}}}
+
+% Take care of Texinfo commands that can appear in an index entry.
+% Since there are some commands we want to expand, and others we don't,
+% we have to laboriously prevent expansion for those that we don't.
+%
+\def\indexdummies{%
+  \escapechar = `\\     % use backslash in output files.
+  \def\@{@}% change to @@ when we switch to @ as escape char in index files.
+  \def\ {\realbackslash\space }%
+  %
+  % Need these in case \tex is in effect and \{ is a \delimiter again.
+  % But can't use \lbracecmd and \rbracecmd because texindex assumes
+  % braces and backslashes are used only as delimiters.
+  \let\{ = \mylbrace
+  \let\} = \myrbrace
+  %
+  % I don't entirely understand this, but when an index entry is
+  % generated from a macro call, the \endinput which \scanmacro inserts
+  % causes processing to be prematurely terminated.  This is,
+  % apparently, because \indexsorttmp is fully expanded, and \endinput
+  % is an expandable command.  The redefinition below makes \endinput
+  % disappear altogether for that purpose -- although logging shows that
+  % processing continues to some further point.  On the other hand, it
+  % seems \endinput does not hurt in the printed index arg, since that
+  % is still getting written without apparent harm.
+  % 
+  % Sample source (mac-idx3.tex, reported by Graham Percival to
+  % help-texinfo, 22may06):
+  % @macro funindex {WORD}
+  % @findex xyz
+  % @end macro
+  % ...
+  % @funindex commtest
+  % 
+  % The above is not enough to reproduce the bug, but it gives the flavor.
+  % 
+  % Sample whatsit resulting:
+  % .@write3{\entry{xyz}{@folio }{@code {xyz@endinput }}}
+  % 
+  % So:
+  \let\endinput = \empty
+  %
+  % Do the redefinitions.
+  \commondummies
+}
+
+% For the aux and toc files, @ is the escape character.  So we want to
+% redefine everything using @ as the escape character (instead of
+% \realbackslash, still used for index files).  When everything uses @,
+% this will be simpler.
+%
+\def\atdummies{%
+  \def\@{@@}%
+  \def\ {@ }%
+  \let\{ = \lbraceatcmd
+  \let\} = \rbraceatcmd
+  %
+  % Do the redefinitions.
+  \commondummies
+  \otherbackslash
+}
+
+% Called from \indexdummies and \atdummies.
+%
+\def\commondummies{%
+  %
+  % \definedummyword defines \#1 as \string\#1\space, thus effectively
+  % preventing its expansion.  This is used only for control% words,
+  % not control letters, because the \space would be incorrect for
+  % control characters, but is needed to separate the control word
+  % from whatever follows.
+  %
+  % For control letters, we have \definedummyletter, which omits the
+  % space.
+  %
+  % These can be used both for control words that take an argument and
+  % those that do not.  If it is followed by {arg} in the input, then
+  % that will dutifully get written to the index (or wherever).
+  %
+  \def\definedummyword  ##1{\def##1{\string##1\space}}%
+  \def\definedummyletter##1{\def##1{\string##1}}%
+  \let\definedummyaccent\definedummyletter
+  %
+  \commondummiesnofonts
+  %
+  \definedummyletter\_%
+  %
+  % Non-English letters.
+  \definedummyword\AA
+  \definedummyword\AE
+  \definedummyword\L
+  \definedummyword\OE
+  \definedummyword\O
+  \definedummyword\aa
+  \definedummyword\ae
+  \definedummyword\l
+  \definedummyword\oe
+  \definedummyword\o
+  \definedummyword\ss
+  \definedummyword\exclamdown
+  \definedummyword\questiondown
+  \definedummyword\ordf
+  \definedummyword\ordm
+  %
+  % Although these internal commands shouldn't show up, sometimes they do.
+  \definedummyword\bf
+  \definedummyword\gtr
+  \definedummyword\hat
+  \definedummyword\less
+  \definedummyword\sf
+  \definedummyword\sl
+  \definedummyword\tclose
+  \definedummyword\tt
+  %
+  \definedummyword\LaTeX
+  \definedummyword\TeX
+  %
+  % Assorted special characters.
+  \definedummyword\bullet
+  \definedummyword\comma
+  \definedummyword\copyright
+  \definedummyword\registeredsymbol
+  \definedummyword\dots
+  \definedummyword\enddots
+  \definedummyword\equiv
+  \definedummyword\error
+  \definedummyword\euro
+  \definedummyword\guillemetleft
+  \definedummyword\guillemetright
+  \definedummyword\guilsinglleft
+  \definedummyword\guilsinglright
+  \definedummyword\expansion
+  \definedummyword\minus
+  \definedummyword\pounds
+  \definedummyword\point
+  \definedummyword\print
+  \definedummyword\quotedblbase
+  \definedummyword\quotedblleft
+  \definedummyword\quotedblright
+  \definedummyword\quoteleft
+  \definedummyword\quoteright
+  \definedummyword\quotesinglbase
+  \definedummyword\result
+  \definedummyword\textdegree
+  %
+  % We want to disable all macros so that they are not expanded by \write.
+  \macrolist
+  %
+  \normalturnoffactive
+  %
+  % Handle some cases of @value -- where it does not contain any
+  % (non-fully-expandable) commands.
+  \makevalueexpandable
+}
+
+% \commondummiesnofonts: common to \commondummies and \indexnofonts.
+%
+\def\commondummiesnofonts{%
+  % Control letters and accents.
+  \definedummyletter\!%
+  \definedummyaccent\"%
+  \definedummyaccent\'%
+  \definedummyletter\*%
+  \definedummyaccent\,%
+  \definedummyletter\.%
+  \definedummyletter\/%
+  \definedummyletter\:%
+  \definedummyaccent\=%
+  \definedummyletter\?%
+  \definedummyaccent\^%
+  \definedummyaccent\`%
+  \definedummyaccent\~%
+  \definedummyword\u
+  \definedummyword\v
+  \definedummyword\H
+  \definedummyword\dotaccent
+  \definedummyword\ringaccent
+  \definedummyword\tieaccent
+  \definedummyword\ubaraccent
+  \definedummyword\udotaccent
+  \definedummyword\dotless
+  %
+  % Texinfo font commands.
+  \definedummyword\b
+  \definedummyword\i
+  \definedummyword\r
+  \definedummyword\sc
+  \definedummyword\t
+  %
+  % Commands that take arguments.
+  \definedummyword\acronym
+  \definedummyword\cite
+  \definedummyword\code
+  \definedummyword\command
+  \definedummyword\dfn
+  \definedummyword\emph
+  \definedummyword\env
+  \definedummyword\file
+  \definedummyword\kbd
+  \definedummyword\key
+  \definedummyword\math
+  \definedummyword\option
+  \definedummyword\pxref
+  \definedummyword\ref
+  \definedummyword\samp
+  \definedummyword\strong
+  \definedummyword\tie
+  \definedummyword\uref
+  \definedummyword\url
+  \definedummyword\var
+  \definedummyword\verb
+  \definedummyword\w
+  \definedummyword\xref
+}
+
+% \indexnofonts is used when outputting the strings to sort the index
+% by, and when constructing control sequence names.  It eliminates all
+% control sequences and just writes whatever the best ASCII sort string
+% would be for a given command (usually its argument).
+%
+\def\indexnofonts{%
+  % Accent commands should become @asis.
+  \def\definedummyaccent##1{\let##1\asis}%
+  % We can just ignore other control letters.
+  \def\definedummyletter##1{\let##1\empty}%
+  % Hopefully, all control words can become @asis.
+  \let\definedummyword\definedummyaccent
+  %
+  \commondummiesnofonts
+  %
+  % Don't no-op \tt, since it isn't a user-level command
+  % and is used in the definitions of the active chars like <, >, |, etc.
+  % Likewise with the other plain tex font commands.
+  %\let\tt=\asis
+  %
+  \def\ { }%
+  \def\@{@}%
+  % how to handle braces?
+  \def\_{\normalunderscore}%
+  %
+  % Non-English letters.
+  \def\AA{AA}%
+  \def\AE{AE}%
+  \def\L{L}%
+  \def\OE{OE}%
+  \def\O{O}%
+  \def\aa{aa}%
+  \def\ae{ae}%
+  \def\l{l}%
+  \def\oe{oe}%
+  \def\o{o}%
+  \def\ss{ss}%
+  \def\exclamdown{!}%
+  \def\questiondown{?}%
+  \def\ordf{a}%
+  \def\ordm{o}%
+  %
+  \def\LaTeX{LaTeX}%
+  \def\TeX{TeX}%
+  %
+  % Assorted special characters.
+  % (The following {} will end up in the sort string, but that's ok.)
+  \def\bullet{bullet}%
+  \def\comma{,}%
+  \def\copyright{copyright}%
+  \def\registeredsymbol{R}%
+  \def\dots{...}%
+  \def\enddots{...}%
+  \def\equiv{==}%
+  \def\error{error}%
+  \def\euro{euro}%
+  \def\guillemetleft{<<}%
+  \def\guillemetright{>>}%
+  \def\guilsinglleft{<}%
+  \def\guilsinglright{>}%
+  \def\expansion{==>}%
+  \def\minus{-}%
+  \def\pounds{pounds}%
+  \def\point{.}%
+  \def\print{-|}%
+  \def\quotedblbase{"}%
+  \def\quotedblleft{"}%
+  \def\quotedblright{"}%
+  \def\quoteleft{`}%
+  \def\quoteright{'}%
+  \def\quotesinglbase{,}%
+  \def\result{=>}%
+  \def\textdegree{degrees}%
+  %
+  % We need to get rid of all macros, leaving only the arguments (if present).
+  % Of course this is not nearly correct, but it is the best we can do for now.
+  % makeinfo does not expand macros in the argument to @deffn, which ends up
+  % writing an index entry, and texindex isn't prepared for an index sort entry
+  % that starts with \.
+  % 
+  % Since macro invocations are followed by braces, we can just redefine them
+  % to take a single TeX argument.  The case of a macro invocation that
+  % goes to end-of-line is not handled.
+  % 
+  \macrolist
+}
+
+\let\indexbackslash=0  %overridden during \printindex.
+\let\SETmarginindex=\relax % put index entries in margin (undocumented)?
+
+% Most index entries go through here, but \dosubind is the general case.
+% #1 is the index name, #2 is the entry text.
+\def\doind#1#2{\dosubind{#1}{#2}{}}
+
+% Workhorse for all \fooindexes.
+% #1 is name of index, #2 is stuff to put there, #3 is subentry --
+% empty if called from \doind, as we usually are (the main exception
+% is with most defuns, which call us directly).
+%
+\def\dosubind#1#2#3{%
+  \iflinks
+  {%
+    % Store the main index entry text (including the third arg).
+    \toks0 = {#2}%
+    % If third arg is present, precede it with a space.
+    \def\thirdarg{#3}%
+    \ifx\thirdarg\empty \else
+      \toks0 = \expandafter{\the\toks0 \space #3}%
+    \fi
+    %
+    \edef\writeto{\csname#1indfile\endcsname}%
+    %
+    \safewhatsit\dosubindwrite
+  }%
+  \fi
+}
+
+% Write the entry in \toks0 to the index file:
+%
+\def\dosubindwrite{%
+  % Put the index entry in the margin if desired.
+  \ifx\SETmarginindex\relax\else
+    \insert\margin{\hbox{\vrule height8pt depth3pt width0pt \the\toks0}}%
+  \fi
+  %
+  % Remember, we are within a group.
+  \indexdummies % Must do this here, since \bf, etc expand at this stage
+  \def\backslashcurfont{\indexbackslash}% \indexbackslash isn't defined now
+      % so it will be output as is; and it will print as backslash.
+  %
+  % Process the index entry with all font commands turned off, to
+  % get the string to sort by.
+  {\indexnofonts
+   \edef\temp{\the\toks0}% need full expansion
+   \xdef\indexsorttmp{\temp}%
+  }%
+  %
+  % Set up the complete index entry, with both the sort key and
+  % the original text, including any font commands.  We write
+  % three arguments to \entry to the .?? file (four in the
+  % subentry case), texindex reduces to two when writing the .??s
+  % sorted result.
+  \edef\temp{%
+    \write\writeto{%
+      \string\entry{\indexsorttmp}{\noexpand\folio}{\the\toks0}}%
+  }%
+  \temp
+}
+
+% Take care of unwanted page breaks/skips around a whatsit:
+%
+% If a skip is the last thing on the list now, preserve it
+% by backing up by \lastskip, doing the \write, then inserting
+% the skip again.  Otherwise, the whatsit generated by the
+% \write or \pdfdest will make \lastskip zero.  The result is that
+% sequences like this:
+% @end defun
+% @tindex whatever
+% @defun ...
+% will have extra space inserted, because the \medbreak in the
+% start of the @defun won't see the skip inserted by the @end of
+% the previous defun.
+%
+% But don't do any of this if we're not in vertical mode.  We
+% don't want to do a \vskip and prematurely end a paragraph.
+%
+% Avoid page breaks due to these extra skips, too.
+%
+% But wait, there is a catch there:
+% We'll have to check whether \lastskip is zero skip.  \ifdim is not
+% sufficient for this purpose, as it ignores stretch and shrink parts
+% of the skip.  The only way seems to be to check the textual
+% representation of the skip.
+%
+% The following is almost like \def\zeroskipmacro{0.0pt} except that
+% the ``p'' and ``t'' characters have catcode \other, not 11 (letter).
+%
+\edef\zeroskipmacro{\expandafter\the\csname z@skip\endcsname}
+%
+\newskip\whatsitskip
+\newcount\whatsitpenalty
+%
+% ..., ready, GO:
+%
+\def\safewhatsit#1{%
+\ifhmode
+  #1%
+\else
+  % \lastskip and \lastpenalty cannot both be nonzero simultaneously.
+  \whatsitskip = \lastskip
+  \edef\lastskipmacro{\the\lastskip}%
+  \whatsitpenalty = \lastpenalty
+  %
+  % If \lastskip is nonzero, that means the last item was a
+  % skip.  And since a skip is discardable, that means this
+  % -\whatsitskip glue we're inserting is preceded by a
+  % non-discardable item, therefore it is not a potential
+  % breakpoint, therefore no \nobreak needed.
+  \ifx\lastskipmacro\zeroskipmacro
+  \else
+    \vskip-\whatsitskip
+  \fi
+  %
+  #1%
+  %
+  \ifx\lastskipmacro\zeroskipmacro
+    % If \lastskip was zero, perhaps the last item was a penalty, and
+    % perhaps it was >=10000, e.g., a \nobreak.  In that case, we want
+    % to re-insert the same penalty (values >10000 are used for various
+    % signals); since we just inserted a non-discardable item, any
+    % following glue (such as a \parskip) would be a breakpoint.  For example:
+    % 
+    %   @deffn deffn-whatever
+    %   @vindex index-whatever
+    %   Description.
+    % would allow a break between the index-whatever whatsit
+    % and the "Description." paragraph.
+    \ifnum\whatsitpenalty>9999 \penalty\whatsitpenalty \fi
+  \else
+    % On the other hand, if we had a nonzero \lastskip,
+    % this make-up glue would be preceded by a non-discardable item
+    % (the whatsit from the \write), so we must insert a \nobreak.
+    \nobreak\vskip\whatsitskip
+  \fi
+\fi
+}
+
+% The index entry written in the file actually looks like
+%  \entry {sortstring}{page}{topic}
+% or
+%  \entry {sortstring}{page}{topic}{subtopic}
+% The texindex program reads in these files and writes files
+% containing these kinds of lines:
+%  \initial {c}
+%     before the first topic whose initial is c
+%  \entry {topic}{pagelist}
+%     for a topic that is used without subtopics
+%  \primary {topic}
+%     for the beginning of a topic that is used with subtopics
+%  \secondary {subtopic}{pagelist}
+%     for each subtopic.
+
+% Define the user-accessible indexing commands
+% @findex, @vindex, @kindex, @cindex.
+
+\def\findex {\fnindex}
+\def\kindex {\kyindex}
+\def\cindex {\cpindex}
+\def\vindex {\vrindex}
+\def\tindex {\tpindex}
+\def\pindex {\pgindex}
+
+\def\cindexsub {\begingroup\obeylines\cindexsub}
+{\obeylines %
+\gdef\cindexsub "#1" #2^^M{\endgroup %
+\dosubind{cp}{#2}{#1}}}
+
+% Define the macros used in formatting output of the sorted index material.
+
+% @printindex causes a particular index (the ??s file) to get printed.
+% It does not print any chapter heading (usually an @unnumbered).
+%
+\parseargdef\printindex{\begingroup
+  \dobreak \chapheadingskip{10000}%
+  %
+  \smallfonts \rm
+  \tolerance = 9500
+  \plainfrenchspacing
+  \everypar = {}% don't want the \kern\-parindent from indentation suppression.
+  %
+  % See if the index file exists and is nonempty.
+  % Change catcode of @ here so that if the index file contains
+  % \initial {@}
+  % as its first line, TeX doesn't complain about mismatched braces
+  % (because it thinks @} is a control sequence).
+  \catcode`\@ = 11
+  \openin 1 \jobname.#1s
+  \ifeof 1
+    % \enddoublecolumns gets confused if there is no text in the index,
+    % and it loses the chapter title and the aux file entries for the
+    % index.  The easiest way to prevent this problem is to make sure
+    % there is some text.
+    \putwordIndexNonexistent
+  \else
+    %
+    % If the index file exists but is empty, then \openin leaves \ifeof
+    % false.  We have to make TeX try to read something from the file, so
+    % it can discover if there is anything in it.
+    \read 1 to \temp
+    \ifeof 1
+      \putwordIndexIsEmpty
+    \else
+      % Index files are almost Texinfo source, but we use \ as the escape
+      % character.  It would be better to use @, but that's too big a change
+      % to make right now.
+      \def\indexbackslash{\backslashcurfont}%
+      \catcode`\\ = 0
+      \escapechar = `\\
+      \begindoublecolumns
+      \input \jobname.#1s
+      \enddoublecolumns
+    \fi
+  \fi
+  \closein 1
+\endgroup}
+
+% These macros are used by the sorted index file itself.
+% Change them to control the appearance of the index.
+
+\def\initial#1{{%
+  % Some minor font changes for the special characters.
+  \let\tentt=\sectt \let\tt=\sectt \let\sf=\sectt
+  %
+  % Remove any glue we may have, we'll be inserting our own.
+  \removelastskip
+  %
+  % We like breaks before the index initials, so insert a bonus.
+  \nobreak
+  \vskip 0pt plus 3\baselineskip
+  \penalty 0
+  \vskip 0pt plus -3\baselineskip
+  %
+  % Typeset the initial.  Making this add up to a whole number of
+  % baselineskips increases the chance of the dots lining up from column
+  % to column.  It still won't often be perfect, because of the stretch
+  % we need before each entry, but it's better.
+  %
+  % No shrink because it confuses \balancecolumns.
+  \vskip 1.67\baselineskip plus .5\baselineskip
+  \leftline{\secbf #1}%
+  % Do our best not to break after the initial.
+  \nobreak
+  \vskip .33\baselineskip plus .1\baselineskip
+}}
+
+% \entry typesets a paragraph consisting of the text (#1), dot leaders, and
+% then page number (#2) flushed to the right margin.  It is used for index
+% and table of contents entries.  The paragraph is indented by \leftskip.
+%
+% A straightforward implementation would start like this:
+%      \def\entry#1#2{...
+% But this freezes the catcodes in the argument, and can cause problems to
+% @code, which sets - active.  This problem was fixed by a kludge---
+% ``-'' was active throughout whole index, but this isn't really right.
+%
+% The right solution is to prevent \entry from swallowing the whole text.
+%                                 --kasal, 21nov03
+\def\entry{%
+  \begingroup
+    %
+    % Start a new paragraph if necessary, so our assignments below can't
+    % affect previous text.
+    \par
+    %
+    % Do not fill out the last line with white space.
+    \parfillskip = 0in
+    %
+    % No extra space above this paragraph.
+    \parskip = 0in
+    %
+    % Do not prefer a separate line ending with a hyphen to fewer lines.
+    \finalhyphendemerits = 0
+    %
+    % \hangindent is only relevant when the entry text and page number
+    % don't both fit on one line.  In that case, bob suggests starting the
+    % dots pretty far over on the line.  Unfortunately, a large
+    % indentation looks wrong when the entry text itself is broken across
+    % lines.  So we use a small indentation and put up with long leaders.
+    %
+    % \hangafter is reset to 1 (which is the value we want) at the start
+    % of each paragraph, so we need not do anything with that.
+    \hangindent = 2em
+    %
+    % When the entry text needs to be broken, just fill out the first line
+    % with blank space.
+    \rightskip = 0pt plus1fil
+    %
+    % A bit of stretch before each entry for the benefit of balancing
+    % columns.
+    \vskip 0pt plus1pt
+    %
+    % Swallow the left brace of the text (first parameter):
+    \afterassignment\doentry
+    \let\temp =
+}
+\def\doentry{%
+    \bgroup % Instead of the swallowed brace.
+      \noindent
+      \aftergroup\finishentry
+      % And now comes the text of the entry.
+}
+\def\finishentry#1{%
+    % #1 is the page number.
+    %
+    % The following is kludged to not output a line of dots in the index if
+    % there are no page numbers.  The next person who breaks this will be
+    % cursed by a Unix daemon.
+    \setbox\boxA = \hbox{#1}%
+    \ifdim\wd\boxA = 0pt
+      \ %
+    \else
+      %
+      % If we must, put the page number on a line of its own, and fill out
+      % this line with blank space.  (The \hfil is overwhelmed with the
+      % fill leaders glue in \indexdotfill if the page number does fit.)
+      \hfil\penalty50
+      \null\nobreak\indexdotfill % Have leaders before the page number.
+      %
+      % The `\ ' here is removed by the implicit \unskip that TeX does as
+      % part of (the primitive) \par.  Without it, a spurious underfull
+      % \hbox ensues.
+      \ifpdf
+       \pdfgettoks#1.%
+       \ \the\toksA
+      \else
+       \ #1%
+      \fi
+    \fi
+    \par
+  \endgroup
+}
+
+% Like plain.tex's \dotfill, except uses up at least 1 em.
+\def\indexdotfill{\cleaders
+  \hbox{$\mathsurround=0pt \mkern1.5mu.\mkern1.5mu$}\hskip 1em plus 1fill}
+
+\def\primary #1{\line{#1\hfil}}
+
+\newskip\secondaryindent \secondaryindent=0.5cm
+\def\secondary#1#2{{%
+  \parfillskip=0in
+  \parskip=0in
+  \hangindent=1in
+  \hangafter=1
+  \noindent\hskip\secondaryindent\hbox{#1}\indexdotfill
+  \ifpdf
+    \pdfgettoks#2.\ \the\toksA % The page number ends the paragraph.
+  \else
+    #2
+  \fi
+  \par
+}}
+
+% Define two-column mode, which we use to typeset indexes.
+% Adapted from the TeXbook, page 416, which is to say,
+% the manmac.tex format used to print the TeXbook itself.
+\catcode`\@=11
+
+\newbox\partialpage
+\newdimen\doublecolumnhsize
+
+\def\begindoublecolumns{\begingroup % ended by \enddoublecolumns
+  % Grab any single-column material above us.
+  \output = {%
+    %
+    % Here is a possibility not foreseen in manmac: if we accumulate a
+    % whole lot of material, we might end up calling this \output
+    % routine twice in a row (see the doublecol-lose test, which is
+    % essentially a couple of indexes with @setchapternewpage off).  In
+    % that case we just ship out what is in \partialpage with the normal
+    % output routine.  Generally, \partialpage will be empty when this
+    % runs and this will be a no-op.  See the indexspread.tex test case.
+    \ifvoid\partialpage \else
+      \onepageout{\pagecontents\partialpage}%
+    \fi
+    %
+    \global\setbox\partialpage = \vbox{%
+      % Unvbox the main output page.
+      \unvbox\PAGE
+      \kern-\topskip \kern\baselineskip
+    }%
+  }%
+  \eject % run that output routine to set \partialpage
+  %
+  % Use the double-column output routine for subsequent pages.
+  \output = {\doublecolumnout}%
+  %
+  % Change the page size parameters.  We could do this once outside this
+  % routine, in each of @smallbook, @afourpaper, and the default 8.5x11
+  % format, but then we repeat the same computation.  Repeating a couple
+  % of assignments once per index is clearly meaningless for the
+  % execution time, so we may as well do it in one place.
+  %
+  % First we halve the line length, less a little for the gutter between
+  % the columns.  We compute the gutter based on the line length, so it
+  % changes automatically with the paper format.  The magic constant
+  % below is chosen so that the gutter has the same value (well, +-<1pt)
+  % as it did when we hard-coded it.
+  %
+  % We put the result in a separate register, \doublecolumhsize, so we
+  % can restore it in \pagesofar, after \hsize itself has (potentially)
+  % been clobbered.
+  %
+  \doublecolumnhsize = \hsize
+    \advance\doublecolumnhsize by -.04154\hsize
+    \divide\doublecolumnhsize by 2
+  \hsize = \doublecolumnhsize
+  %
+  % Double the \vsize as well.  (We don't need a separate register here,
+  % since nobody clobbers \vsize.)
+  \vsize = 2\vsize
+}
+
+% The double-column output routine for all double-column pages except
+% the last.
+%
+\def\doublecolumnout{%
+  \splittopskip=\topskip \splitmaxdepth=\maxdepth
+  % Get the available space for the double columns -- the normal
+  % (undoubled) page height minus any material left over from the
+  % previous page.
+  \dimen@ = \vsize
+  \divide\dimen@ by 2
+  \advance\dimen@ by -\ht\partialpage
+  %
+  % box0 will be the left-hand column, box2 the right.
+  \setbox0=\vsplit255 to\dimen@ \setbox2=\vsplit255 to\dimen@
+  \onepageout\pagesofar
+  \unvbox255
+  \penalty\outputpenalty
+}
+%
+% Re-output the contents of the output page -- any previous material,
+% followed by the two boxes we just split, in box0 and box2.