newhandbook - add pages
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / newhandbook / pkgsrc / index.mdwn
1
2
3 # Installing Applications using NetBSD's pkgsrc framework 
4
5
6 <!-- XXX: possibly also mention pkgin and other fancy stuff. -->
7
8
9
10 ## Overview of Software Installation 
11
12 If you have used a UNIX® system before you will know that the typical procedure for installing third party software goes something like this:
13
14
15   1. Download the software, which might be distributed in source code format, or as a binary.
16
17   1. Unpack the software from its distribution format (typically a tarball compressed with [compress(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=compress&section1), [gzip(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=gzip&section=1), or [bzip2(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=bzip2&section=1)).
18
19   1. Locate the documentation (perhaps an `INSTALL` or `README` file, or some files in a `doc/` subdirectory) and read up on how to install the software.
20
21   1. If the software was distributed in source format, compile it. This may involve editing a `Makefile`, or running a `configure` script, and other work.
22
23   1. Test and install the software.
24
25
26 And that is only if everything goes well. If you are installing a software package that was not deliberately ported to DragonFly you may even have to go in and edit the code to make it work properly. Should you want to, you can continue to install software the ***traditional*** way with DragonFly. However, DragonFly provides technology from NetBSD, which can save you a lot of effort: pkgsrc. At the time of writing, over 8,000 third party applications have been made available in this way.
27
28
29 For any given application, the DragonFly Binary package for that application is a single file which you must download. The package contains pre-compiled copies of all the commands for the application, as well as any configuration files or documentation. A downloaded package file can be manipulated with DragonFly package management commands, such as [pkg_radd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_add&section1), [pkg_delete(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_delete&section=1), [pkg_info(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_info&section=1), and so on. Installing a new application can be carried out with a single command.
30
31
32
33 In addition the pkgsrc collection supplies a collection of files designed to automate the process of compiling an application from source code. Remember that there are a number of steps you would normally carry out if you compiled a program yourself (downloading, unpacking, patching, compiling, installing). The files that make up a pkgsrc source collection contain all the necessary information to allow the system to do this for you. You run a handful of simple commands and the source code for the application is automatically downloaded, extracted, patched, compiled, and installed for you. In fact, the pkgsrc source subsystem can also be used to generate packages which can later be manipulated with `pkg_add` and the other package management commands that will be introduced shortly.
34
35
36 Pkgsrc understands ***dependencies***. Suppose you want to install an application that depends on a specific library being installed. Both the application and the library have been made available through the pkgsrc collection. If you use the `pkg_add` command or the pkgsrc subsystem to add the application, both will notice that the library has not been installed, and automatically install the library first. You might be wondering why pkgsrc® bothers with both. Binary packages and the source tree both have their own strengths, and which one you use will depend on your own preference.
37
38
39
40  **Binary Package Benefits** 
41
42
43
44
45 * A compressed package tarball is typically smaller than the compressed tarball containing the source code for the application.
46
47
48 * Packages do not require any additional compilation. For large applications, such as ***Mozilla***, ***KDE***, or ***GNOME*** this can be important, particularly if you are on a slow system.
49
50
51 * Packages do not require any understanding of the process involved in compiling software on DragonFly.
52
53
54
55 **Pkgsrc source Benefits** 
56
57
58
59
60 * Binary packages are normally compiled with conservative options, because they have to run on the maximum number of systems. By installing from the source, you can tweak the compilation options to (for example) generate code that is specific to a Pentium IV or Athlon processor.
61
62
63 * Some applications have compile time options relating to what they can and cannot do. For example, <i>Apache</i> can be configured with a wide variety of different built-in options. By building from the source you do not have to accept the default options, and can set them yourself. In some cases, multiple packages will exist for the same application to specify certain settings. For example, <i>vim</i> is available as a `vim` package and a `vim-gtk` package, depending on whether you have installed an X11 server. This sort of rough tweaking is possible with packages, but rapidly becomes impossible if an application has more than one or two different compile time options.
64
65
66 * The licensing conditions of some software distributions forbid binary distribution. They must be distributed as source code.
67
68
69 * Some people do not trust binary distributions. With source code, it is possible to check for any vulnerabilities built into the program before installing it to an otherwise secure system. Few people perform this much review, however.
70
71
72 * If you have local patches, you will need the source in order to apply them.
73
74
75 * Some people like having code around, so they can read it if they get bored, hack it, borrow from it (license permitting, of course), and so on.
76
77
78
79 To keep track of updated pkgsrc releases subscribe to the [NetBSD pkgsrc users mailing list](http://www.netbsd.org/MailingLists/pkgsrc-users) and the [NetBSD pkgsrc users mailing list](http://www.netbsd.org/MailingLists/tech-pkgsrc). It's also useful to watch the [DragonFly User related mailing list](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) as errors with pkgsrc on DragonFly should be reported there.
80
81
82
83  **Warning:** Before installing any application, you should check http://www.pkgsrc.org/ for security issues related to your application.
84
85
86
87 Audit-packages will automatically check all installed applications for known vulnerabilities, a check will be also performed before any application build. Meanwhile, you can use the command `audit-packages -d` after you have installed some packages.
88
89
90
91
92 ## Finding Your Application 
93
94
95
96 Before you can install any applications you need to know what you want, and what the application is called. DragonFly's list of available applications is growing all the time. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to find what you want:
97
98 Since DragonFly 1.11 [pkg_search(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_search&section1) is included in the base system.  [pkg_search(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_search&section=1) searches an already installed pkgsrc® INDEX for for a given package name.  If pkgsrc® is not installed or the INDEX file is missing, it fetches the [pkg_summary(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_summary&section=5) file.
99
100  **Example. Find a Package** 
101
102     # pkg_search fvwm
103     fvwm-2.4.20nb1          Newer version of X11 Virtual window manager
104     fvwm-2.5.24             Development version of X11 Virtual window manager
105     fvwm-themes-0.6.2nb8    Configuration framework for fvwm2 with samples
106     fvwm-wharf-1.0nb1       Copy of AfterStep's Wharf compatible with fvwm2
107     fvwm1-1.24rnb1          Virtual window manager for X
108
109     
110
111     # pkg_search -v fvwm-2.5
112     Name    : fvwm-2.5.24-50
113     Dir     : wm/fvwm-devel                                     
114     Desc    : Development version of X11 Virtual window manager 
115     URL     : any                                               
116     Deps    : perl>#5.0 gettext-lib>0.14.5 png>=1.2.4 libXext>=0.99.0 libX11>=1.1 libXau>=1.0 libXdmcp>=0.99 libX11>=0.99 libXft>=2.1.10 fontconfig>=2.2 freetype2>=2.1.8 
117     freetype2>=2.1.3 expat>=1.95.7 expat>=1.95.4 freetype2>=2.1.10nb1 expat>=2.0.0nb1 fontconfig>=2.4.2 fontconfig>=2.1nb2 libXrender>=0.9.2 libXpm>=3.5.4.2 libXt>=1.0.0 
118     libSM>=0.99.2 libICE>=0.99.1 png>=1.2.9nb2
119
120
121 To get more verbose information about a package (dependencies, path in `/usr/pkgsrc`, Description) use the `-v` switch.
122
123 There is a pkgsrc® related web site that maintains an up-to-date searchable list of all the available applications, at [http://pkgsrc.se](http://pkgsrc.se). The packages and the corresponding source tree are divided into categories, and you may either search for an application by name (if you know it), or see all the applications available in a category.
124
125 ## Get the description of a package 
126
127 To get a more verbose description of the package use pkg_search's `-s` switch with the exact package name (e.g. as given by a normal query):
128
129     # pkg_search -s fvwm-2.5.24
130     Fvwm is a very famous window manager for X, which provides a
131     virtual/multiple disjoint desktop, a 3-D look for windows decorations,
132     shaped/color icons. It gives a very good emulation of mwm. A nice
133     button-bar can be used to provide convenient access to frequently used
134     functions or programs.
135
136     This package is based on the unstable 2.5.x series of fvwm.  Do not
137     use it unless comfortable running beta software.
138
139
140  **Note:**  To use the `-s` switch you need a complete pkgsrc tree installed.
141
142
143  
144 ## Using the Binary Packages System 
145
146 ***DragonFly customizations contributed by Chern Lee and Adrian Nida. ***
147
148
149
150 ### Installing a Binary Package 
151
152 You can use the [pkg_add(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_add&section=1) utility to install a pkgsrc® software package from a local file or from a server on the network.
153
154 The [pkg_radd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_radd&section=1) tool conveniently fetches and installs the requested package from one of DragonFly's pkg servers without having to know the full URL to it.
155
156 <!-- XXX: put in pkg_radd example, it's more meaningful; also check the url below (ftp.pkgsrc-box.org) -->
157
158
159 Binary package files are distributed in `.tgz` formats. You can find them at the default location ftp://ftp.pkgsrc-box.org/packages/, among other sites. The layout of the packages is similar to that of the `/usr/pkgsrc` tree. Each category has its own directory, and every package can be found within the `All` directory.
160
161
162
163 The directory structure of the binary package system matches the source tree layout; they work with each other to form the entire package system.
164
165 #### Using pkg_radd 
166
167 Since DragonFly 1.11 you can use [pkg_radd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_radd&section=1) to install binary packages without having to set `PACKAGESITE` or providing the complete URL.  [pkg_radd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_radd&section=1) will handle that for you:
168
169     
170
171     # pkg_radd host
172     #
173
174
175 ### Dealing with different package versions 
176
177 Due to the fact that the official packages are only build for the RELEASE-Version of DragonFly, it is possible that you see a warning when installing binary packages on a DEVELOPMENT-version of DragonFly.  The warning could look like this:
178
179     pkg_add: Warning: package `vim-gtk2-7.1.116.tgz' was built for a different version of the OS:
180     pkg_add: DragonFly/i386 1.10.1 (pkg) vs. DragonFly/i386 1.11.0 (this host)
181
182 You can safely ignore this warning.  Normally all packages build for RELEASE run fine on DEVELOPMENT unless a major API-breakage was introduced.  In this case you would see a message from the developers on the appropriate mailing list.
183
184 ### Managing Packages 
185
186 [pkg_info(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_info&section=1) is a utility that lists and describes the various packages installed.
187
188
189
190     # pkg_info
191     digest-20050731     Message digest wrapper utility
192     screen-4.0.2nb4     Multi-screen window manager
193     ...
194
195 [pkg_version(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_version&section=1) is a utility that summarizes the versions of all installed packages. It compares the package version to the current version found in the ports tree.
196
197 ### Deleting a Package 
198
199 To remove a previously installed software package, use the [pkg_delete(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_delete&section=1) utility.
200
201
202     # pkg_delete screen-4.0.3.tgz
203
204 ### Miscellaneous 
205
206 All package information is stored within the `/var/db/pkg` directory. The installed file list and descriptions of each package can be found within subdirectories of this directory.
207
208
209
210 ## Using the pkgsrc® Source Tree 
211
212 The following sections provide basic instructions on using the pkgsrc source tree to install or remove programs from your system.
213
214 ### Obtaining the pkgsrc Source Tree 
215
216 Before you can install pkgsrc® packages from source, you must first obtain the pkgsrc source tree--which is essentially a set of `Makefiles`, patches, and description files placed in `/usr/pkgsrc`.
217
218 #### CVS 
219
220 The primary method to obtain and keep your pkgsrc collection up to date is by using  **CVS**. This is a quick method for getting the pkgsrc collection using  **CVS** .
221
222 Run `cvs`:
223
224     # cd /usr
225     # cvs -d anoncvs@anoncvs.us.netbsd.org:/cvsroot co pkgsrc
226
227  
228 Running the following command later will download and apply all the recent changes to your source tree.
229
230     # cd /usr/pkgsrc
231     # cvs up
232
233   
234 #### The DragonFly Way 
235
236 As of the 1.10 release, you can use the `/usr/Makefile` to checkout & update the pkgsrc tree quickly.
237
238 as root:
239
240
241     # cd /usr
242     # make pkgsrc-create
243
244 to checkout from git repository, or
245
246
247     # cd /usr
248     # make pkgsrc-update
249
250 to update. **NOTE**: If you use CVS instead of git please do edit the Makefile to use an appropriately speedy CVS mirror for your location and to reduce load on the main pkgsrc CVS server.
251
252 ## Installing Packages from Source
253
254 The first thing that should be explained when it comes to the source tree is what is actually meant by a ***skeleton***. In a nutshell, a source skeleton is a minimal set of files that tell your DragonFly system how to cleanly compile and install a program. Each source skeleton should include:
255
256 * A `Makefile`. The `Makefile` contains various statements that specify how the application should be compiled and where it should be installed on your system.
257
258
259 * A `distinfo` file. This file contains information about the files that must be downloaded to build the port and their checksums, to verify that files have not been corrupted during the download using [md5(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=md5&section=1).
260
261
262 * A `files` directory. This directory contains the application specific files that are needed for the programs appropriate run-time configuration.
263
264   This directory may also contain other files used to build the port.
265
266
267 * A `patches` directory. This directory contains patches to make the program compile and install on your DragonFly system. Patches are basically small files that specify changes to particular files. They are in plain text format, and basically say <i>Remove line 10</i> or <i>Change line 26 to this ...</i>. Patches are also known as <i>diffs</i> because they are generated by the [diff(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#diff&section1) program.
268
269
270 * A `DESCR` file. This is a more detailed, often multiple-line, description of the program.
271
272
273 * A `PLIST` file. This is a list of all the files that will be installed by the port. It also tells the pkgsrc system what files to remove upon deinstallation.
274
275
276
277 Some pkgsrc source skeletons have other files, such as `MESSAGE`. The pkgsrc system uses these files to handle special situations. If you want more details on these files, and on pkgsrc in general, check out [The pkgsrc guide](http://www.netbsd.org/Documentation/pkgsrc/), available at the [NetBSD website](http://www.netbsd.org/).
278
279
280
281 Now that you have enough background information to know what the pkgsrc source tree is used for, you are ready to install your first compiled package. There are two ways this can be done, and each is explained below. 
282
283 Another way to find a particular source tree is by using the pkgsrc collection's built-in search mechanism. To use the search feature, you will need to be in the `/usr/pkgsrc` directory. Once in that directory, run `bmake search key=program-name` where `program-name` is the name of the program you want to find. This searches packages names, comments, descriptions and dependencies and can be used to find packages which relate to a particular subject if you don't know the name of the program you are looking for. For example, if you were looking for `apache2`:
284
285
286     # cd /usr/pkgsrc
287     # bmake search key="apache2"
288     Extracting complete dependency database.  This may take a while...
289     ....................................................................................................
290     100
291     ....................................................................................................
292     200
293     <Snip />
294     5800
295     ....................................................................................................
296     5900
297     .................................................................................................Reading database file
298     Flattening dependencies
299     Flattening build dependencies
300     Generating INDEX file
301     Indexed 5999 packages
302     <Snip />
303     Pkg:    apache-2.2.6nb2
304     Path:   www/apache22
305     Info:   Apache HTTP (Web) server, version 2
306     Maint:  tron@NetBSD.org
307     Index:  www
308     B-deps: perl>#5.0 apr-util>1.2.8 apr>=1.2.8 libtool-base>=1.5.22nb1 pkg-config>=0.19 expat>=1.95.7 gmake>=3.78 gettext-lib>=0.14.5 
309     {gettext-tools>=0.14.5,gettext>=0.10.36<0.14.5} expat>=1.95.4 expat>=2.0.0nb1 apr-util>=1.2.8nb1
310     R-deps: perl>#5.0 apr-util>1.2.8 apr>=1.2.8 expat>=1.95.7 expat>=1.95.4 expat>=2.0.0nb1 apr-util>=1.2.8nb1
311     Arch:   any
312
313
314 The part of the output you want to pay particular attention to is the <i>Path</i> line, since that tells you where to find the source tree for the requested application. The other information provided is not needed in order to install the package, so it will not be covered here.
315
316 The search string is case-insensitive. Searching for <i>APACHE</i> will yield the same results as searching for <i>apache</i>.
317
318
319
320  **Note:** It should be noted that <i>Extracting [the] complete dependency database</i> does indeed take a while.
321
322
323
324  **Note:** You must be logged in as `root` to install packages.
325
326
327
328 Now that you have found an application you would like to install, you are ready to do the actual installation. The source package includes instructions on how to build source code, but does not include the actual source code. You can get the source code from a CD-ROM or from the Internet. Source code is distributed in whatever manner the software author desires. Frequently this is a tarred and gzipped file, but it might be compressed with some other tool or even uncompressed. The program source code, whatever form it comes in, is called a ***distfile***. You can get the distfile from a CD-ROM or from the Internet.
329
330
331
332  **Warning:** Before installing any application, you should be sure to have an up-to-date source tree and you should check http://www.pkgsrc.org/ for security issues related to your port.
333
334
335 A security vulnerabilities check can be automatically done by  **audit-packages**  before any new application installation. This tool can be found in the pkgsrc collection ([security/audit-packages](http://pkgsrc.se/security/audit-packages)). Consider running `auditpackages -d` before installing a new package, to fetch the current vulnerabilities database. A security audit and an update of the database will be performed during the daily security system check. For more informations read the audit-packages and [periodic(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#periodic&section8) manual pages.
336
337
338
339  **Note:** It should be noted that the current setup of DragonFly requires the use of `bmake` instead of `make`. This is because the current version of make on DragonFly does not support all the parameters that NetBSD's does.
340
341
342
343  **Note:** You can save an extra step by just running `bmake install` instead of `bmake` and `bmake install` as two separate steps.
344
345
346
347  **Note:** Some shells keep a cache of the commands that are available in the directories listed in the `PATH` environment variable, to speed up lookup operations for the executable file of these commands. If you are using one of these shells, you might have to use the `rehash` command after installing a package, before the newly installed commands can be used. This is true for both shells that are part of the base-system (such as `tcsh`) and shells that are available as packages (for instance, [shells/zsh](http://pkgsrc.se/shells/zsh)).
348
349 <!-- XXX: mention the stuff about the pkgsrc security audit thingie -->
350
351
352 ### Installing Packages from the Internet 
353
354 As with the last section, this section makes an assumption that you have a working Internet connection. If you do not, you will need to put a copy of the distfile into `/usr/pkgsrc/distfiles` manually. Installing a package from the Internet is done exactly the same way as it would be if you already had the distfile. The only difference between the two is that the distfile is downloaded from the Internet on demand.
355
356
357 Here are the steps involved:
358
359
360     # cd /usr/pkgsrc/chat/ircII
361     # bmake install clean
362     => ircii-20040820.tar.bz2 doesn't seem to exist on this system.
363     => Attempting to fetch ircii-20040820.tar.bz2 from ftp://ircii.warped.com/pub/ircII/.
364     => [559843 bytes]
365     [FTP transfer snipped]
366     150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for 'ircii-20040820.tar.bz2' (559843 bytes).
367     100% |***************************************|   550 KB  110.34 KB/s   00:00 ETA
368     226 Transfer complete.
369     [FTP transfer snipped]
370     221 Thank you for using the FTP service on bungi.sjc.warped.net.
371     => Checksum SHA1 OK for ircii-20040820.tar.bz2.
372     => Checksum RMD160 OK for ircii-20040820.tar.bz2.
373     work -> /usr/obj/pkgsrc/chat/ircII/work
374     ##=> Extracting for ircII-20040820
375     #########################################################################=
376     The supported build options for this package are:
377
378     socks4 socks5
379
380     You can select which build options to use by setting PKG_DEFAULT_OPTIONS
381     or the following variable.  Its current value is shown:
382
383     
384     PKG_OPTIONS.ircII (not defined)
385
386     #########################################################################=
387     #########################################################################=
388     The following variables will affect the build process of this package,
389     ircII-20040820.  Their current value is shown below:
390
391     USE_INET6 = YES
392
393     You may want to abort the process now with CTRL-C and change their value
394     before continuing.  Be sure to run `/usr/pkg/bin/bmake clean' after
395     the changes.
396     #########################################################################=
397     ##=> Patching for ircII-20040820
398     ##=> Applying pkgsrc patches for ircII-20040820
399     ##=> Overriding tools for ircII-20040820
400     ##=> Creating toolchain wrappers for ircII-20040820
401     ##=> Configuring for ircII-20040820
402     ...
403     [configure output snipped]
404     ...
405     ##=>  Building for ircII-20040820
406     ...
407     [compilation output snipped]
408     ...
409     ##=>  Installing for ircII-20040820
410     ...
411     [installation output snipped]
412     ...
413     ##=> [Automatic manual page handling]
414     ##=> Registering installation for ircII-20040820
415     ##=> Cleaning for ircII-20040820
416     #
417
418
419
420 <!-- XXX: mention /usr/pkg/etc/mk.conf for options, etc -->
421
422 As you can see, the only difference are the lines that tell you where the system is fetching the package's distfile from.
423
424
425
426 The pkgsrc system uses [ftp(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ftp&section=1) to download the files, which honors various environment variables, including `FTP_PASSIVE_MODE`, `FTP_PROXY`, and `FTP_PASSWORD`. You may need to set one or more of these if you are behind a firewall, or need to use an FTP/HTTP proxy. See [ftp(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ftp&section=1) for the complete list. 
427
428
429
430 For users which cannot be connected all the time, the `bmake fetch` option is provided. Just run this command at the top level directory (`/usr/pkgsrc`) and the required files will be downloaded for you. This command will also work in the lower level categories, for example: `/usr/pkgsrc/net`. Note that if a package depends on libraries or other packages this will ***not*** fetch the distfiles of those packages as well.
431
432
433
434  **Note:** You can build all the packages in a category or as a whole by running `bmake` in the top level directory, just like the aforementioned `bmake `fetch*** method. This is dangerous, however, as some applications cannot co-exist. In other cases, some packages can install two different files with the same filename.
435
436
437
438 In some rare cases, users may need to acquire the tarballs from a site other than the `MASTER_SITES` (the location where files are downloaded from). You can override the `MASTER_SORT`, `MASTER_SORT_REGEX` and `INET_COUNTRY` options either within the `/etc/mk.conf`.
439
440
441
442  **Note:** Some packages allow (or even require) you to provide build options which can enable/disable parts of the application which are unneeded, certain security options, and other customizations. A few which come to mind are [`www/mozilla`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/mozilla), [`security/gpgme`](http://pkgsrc.se/security/gpgme), and [`mail/sylpheed-claws`](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/sylpheed-claws). To find out what build options the application you are installing requires type:
443
444
445
446     
447
448     # bmake show-options
449
450
451
452
453
454  To change the build process, either change the values of PKG_DEFAULT_OPTIONS or PKG_OPTIONS.`***PackageName***` in `/etc/mk.conf` or on the commandline as so:
455
456
457
458     
459
460     # bmake PKG_OPTIONS.ircII="-ssl"
461
462
463
464
465
466  An option is enabled if listed. It is disabled if it is prefixed by a minus sign.
467
468
469
470 #### Dealing with imake 
471
472
473
474 Some applications that use `imake` (a part of the X Window System) do not work well with `PREFIX`, and will insist on installing under `/usr/X11R6`. Similarly, some Perl ports ignore `PREFIX` and install in the Perl tree. Making these applications respect `PREFIX` is a difficult or impossible job.
475
476
477
478 ### Removing Installed Packages 
479
480
481
482 Now that you know how to install packages, you are probably wondering how to remove them, just in case you install one and later on decide that you installed the wrong program. We will remove our previous example (which was `ircII` for those of you not paying attention). As with installing packages, the first thing you must do is change to the package directory, `/usr/pkgsrc/chat/ircII`. After you change directories, you are ready to uninstall `ircII`. This is done with the `bmake deinstall` command:
483
484     
485
486     # cd /usr/pkgsrc/chat/ircII
487     # make deinstall
488     ##=>  Deinstalling for ircII-20040820
489
490
491 That was easy enough. You have removed `ircII` from your system. If you would like to reinstall it, you can do so by running `bmake reinstall` from the `/usr/pkgsrc/chat/ircII` directory.
492
493
494
495 The `bmake deinstall` and `bmake reinstall` sequence does not work once you have run `bmake clean`. If you want to deinstall a package after cleaning, use [pkg_delete(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_delete&section=1) as discussed in the [pkgsrc-using.html Pkgsrc section of the Handbook].
496
497
498
499 ### Packages and Disk Space 
500
501
502
503 Using the pkgsrc collection can definitely eat up your disk space. For this reason you should always remember to clean up the work directories using `bmake clean`. This will remove the `work` directory after a package has been built, and installed. You can also remove the tar files from the `distfiles` directory, and remove the installed package when their use has delimited.
504
505
506
507 ### Upgrading Packages
508
509
510  **Note:** Once you have updated your pkgsrc collection, before attempting a package upgrade, you should check the `/usr/pkgsrc/UPDATING` file. This file describes various issues and additional steps users may encounter and need to perform when updating a port.
511
512
513
514 Keeping your packages up to date can be a tedious job. For instance, to upgrade a package you would go to the package directory, build the package, deinstall the old package , install the new package, and then clean up after the build. Imagine doing that for five packages, tedious right? This was a large problem for system administrators to deal with, and now we have utilities which do this for us. For instance the `pkg_chk` utility will do everything for you!
515
516
517
518 pkg_chk requires a few steps in order to work correctly. They are listed here.
519
520     # pkg_chk -g # make initial list of installed packages
521     # pkg_chk -r  # remove all packages that are not up to date and packages that depend on them
522     # pkg_chk -a  # install all missing packages (use binary packages, this is the default
523     # pkg_chk -as # install all missing packages (build from source)
524
525 The above process removes all packages at once and installs the missing packages one by one.This can cause longer disruption of services when the removed package has to wait a long time for its turn to get installed. "pkg_rolling-replace" replaces packages one by one and one can use it for a better way of package management. You can install "pkg_rolling-replace" by the following procedure.
526
527     # cd /usr/pkgsrc/pkgtools/pkg_rolling-replace/
528     # bmake install
529
530 Once pkg_rolling-replace is installed you can update the packages through the following steps.
531
532     # cd /usr && make pkgsrc-update
533     # pkg_rolling-replace -u
534
535 If some package like "bmake" does not get updated and throws an error during the above steps you can update it manually.
536 Inside the packages directory (devel/bmake in this case)
537
538     # env USE_DESTDIR=full bmake package
539     # bmake clean-depends clean
540
541 And Go to the packages directory and install the binary package with
542
543     # pkg_add -u <pkg_name> (i.e. the name of the .tgz file).
544
545 Also you can use "pkgin" to update software using binary packages just like apt or yum.
546
547     # cd /usr/pkgsrc/pkgtools/pkgin/
548     # bmake install
549
550 Once "pkgin" is installed edit "/usr/pkg/etc/pkgin/repositories.conf" to contain the line ( for i386 packages ).
551
552     http://avalon.dragonflybsd.org/packages/i386/DragonFly-2.5/stable/All
553
554 Then you can run the following commands to get the packages updated.
555
556     # pkgin update
557     # pkgin full-upgrade 
558
559     
560     
561     ## Post-installation Activities 
562
563
564
565 After installing a new application you will normally want to read any documentation it may have included, edit any configuration files that are required, ensure that the application starts at boot time (if it is a daemon), and so on.
566
567
568
569 The exact steps you need to take to configure each application will obviously be different. However, if you have just installed a new application and are wondering ***What now?*** these tips might help:
570
571
572
573
574 Use [pkg_info(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_info&section=1) to find out which files were installed, and where. For example, if you have just installed Foo_Package version 1.0.0, then this command
575
576     # pkg_info -L foopackage-1.0.0 | less
577
578 will show all the files installed by the package. Pay special attention to files in `man/` directories, which will be manual pages, `etc/` directories, which will be configuration files, and `doc/`, which will be more comprehensive documentation. If you are not sure which version of the application was just installed, a command like this
579
580       
581
582     pkg_info | grep -i foopackage
583
584   
585 will find all the installed packages that have <i>foopackage</i> in the package name. Replace <i>foopackage</i> in your command line as necessary.
586
587
588 Once you have identified where the application's manual pages have been installed, review them using [man(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=man&section=1). Similarly, look over the sample configuration files, and any additional documentation that may have been provided.
589
590
591 If the application has a web site, check it for additional documentation, frequently asked questions, and so forth. If you are not sure of the web site address it may be listed in the output from
592
593       
594
595     # pkg_info foopackage-1.0.0
596
597   
598 A `WWW:` line, if present, should provide a URL for the application's web site.
599
600
601 Packages that should start at boot (such as Internet servers) will usually install a sample script in `/usr/pkg/etc/rc.d`. You should review this script for correctness and edit or rename it if needed.
602
603
604
605
606
607
608 ## Dealing with Broken Packages 
609
610
611
612 If you come across a package that does not work for you, there are a few things you can do, including:
613
614
615
616   1. Fix it! The [pkgsrc Guide](http://www.netbsd.org/Documentation/pkgsrc/) includes detailed information on the ***pkgsrc®*** infrastructure so that you can fix the occasional broken package or even submit your own!
617
618   1. Gripe--***by email only***! Send email to the maintainer of the package first. Type `bmake maintainer` or read the `Makefile` to find the maintainer's email address. Remember to include the name and version of the port (send the `$NetBSD:` line from the `Makefile`) and the output leading up to the error when you email the maintainer. If you do not get a response from the maintainer, you can try [users](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) .
619
620   1. Grab the package from an FTP site near you. The ***master*** package collection is on `packages.stura.uni-rostock.de` in the [All directory](ftp://packages.stura.uni-rostock.de/pkgsrc-current/DragonFly/RELEASE/i386/All/). These are more likely to work than trying to compile from source and are a lot faster as well. Use the [pkg_add(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pkg_add&section=1) program to install the package on your system.
621
622
623
624
625