Revert previous
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / howtos / HowToDebugVKernels / index.mdwn
1 # Introduction
2 The purpose of this document is to introduce the reader with vkernel debugging.
3 The vkernel architecture allows us to run DragonFly kernels in userland. These virtual
4 kernels can be paniced or otherwise abused, without affecting the host operating system.
5
6 To make things a bit more interesting, we will use a real life example.
7
8 # Once upon a time
9 ... I wrote a simple program that used the AIO interface. As it turned out we don't support
10 this feature, but at that point I didn't know.
11
12     $ gcc t_aio.c -o t_aio -Wall -ansi -pedantic
13     $ ./t_aio 
14     aio_read: Function not implemented
15     $ 
16
17 Ktrace'ing the process and seeing with my own eyes what was going on, seemed like a good idea.
18 Here comes the fun. I misread the ktrace(1) man page and typed:
19
20     $ ktrace -c ./t_aio
21
22 And the system hang.
23
24 (My intention was to track the system calls of t_aio, but what I typed would actually disable all traces from all process to the t_aio file.)
25
26 # Setup a vkernel
27 To setup a vkernel, please consult this [man page](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=vkernel&section=ANY).
28 It's very straightforward.
29
30 # Reproduce the problem
31 We boot into our vkernel:
32
33     # cd /var/kernel
34     # ./boot/kernel -m 64m -r rootimg.01 -I auto:bridge0
35     [...]
36     login: root
37     #
38 And then try to reproduce the system freeze:
39
40     # ktrace -c ./t_aio
41
42     Fatal trap 12: page fault while in kernel mode
43     mp_lock = 00000001; cpuid = 1
44     fault virtual address   = 0x0
45     fault code              = supervisor read, page not present
46     instruction pointer     = 0x1f:0x80aca52
47     stack pointer           = 0x10:0x5709d914
48     frame pointer           = 0x10:0x5709dbe0
49     processor eflags        = interrupt enabled, resume, IOPL = 0
50     current process         = 692 (ktrace)
51     current thread          = pri 6 
52      <- SMP: XXX
53     kernel: type 12 trap, code=4
54     
55     CPU1 stopping CPUs: 0x00000001
56      stopped
57     Stopped at      0x80aca52:      movl    0(%eax),%eax
58     db> 
59
60 This db> prompt is from ddb(4), the interactive kernel debugger.
61 The
62
63     fault virtual address   = 0x0
64
65 field is indicative of a NULL pointer dereference inside the kernel.
66
67 Let's get a trace of what went wrong:
68
69     db> trace
70     ktrdestroy(57082700,5709dc5c,0,57082700,5709dca0) at 0x80aca52
71     allproc_scan(80aca14,5709dc5c,be,2,0) at 0x80b2e91
72     sys_ktrace(5709dca0,6,0,0,57082700) at 0x80acffe
73     syscall2(5709dd40,6,57082700,0,0) at 0x8214b6d
74     user_trap(5709dd40,570940e8,8214185,0,8215462) at 0x8214d9c
75     go_user(5709dd38,0,0,7b,0) at 0x82151ac
76     db> 
77
78 # Gdb
79 Quoting from vkernel(7):
80
81 It is possible to directly gdb the virtual kernel's process.  It is recommended that you do a `handle SIGSEGV noprint' to ignore page faults processed by the virtual kernel itself and `handle SIGUSR1 noprint' to ignore signals used for simulating inter-processor interrupts (SMP build only).
82
83 You can add these two commands in your ~/.gdbinit to save yourself from typing them again and again.
84
85     $ cat ~/.gdbinit
86     handle SIGSEGV noprint
87     handle SIGUSR1 noprint
88
89 So we are going to attach to the vkernel process:
90
91     # ps aux | grep kernel
92     root  25408  0.0  2.3 1053376 17772  p0  IL+   8:32PM   0:06.51 ./boot/kernel -m 64m -r rootimg.01 -I auto:bridge0
93     # gdb kernel 25408
94     GNU gdb 6.7.1
95     [...]
96
97 Let's get a trace from inside gdb:
98
99     (gdb) bt
100     #0  0x282d4c10 in sigsuspend () from /usr/lib/libc.so.6
101     #1  0x28287eb2 in sigsuspend () from /usr/lib/libthread_xu.so.2
102     #2  0x0821530a in stopsig (nada=24, info=0x40407d2c, ctxp=0x40407a4c) at /usr/src/sys/platform/vkernel/i386/exception.c:112
103     #3  <signal handler called>
104     #4  0x282d4690 in umtx_sleep () from /usr/lib/libc.so.6
105     #5  0x08213bde in cpu_idle () at /usr/src/sys/platform/vkernel/i386/cpu_regs.c:722
106     #6  0x00000000 in ?? ()
107     (gdb) 
108
109 Why does it differ from the ddb's trace ?
110 Well, when the vkernel is sitting at a db> prompt all vkernel threads representing virtual cpu's except the one handling the db> prompt itself will be suspended in stopsig(). The backtrace only sees one of the N threads.
111
112 We need to do better this time. Let's break into the kernel _before_ it crashes. sys_ktrace() seems like a good candidate.
113
114     # gdb kernel 25532
115     GNU gdb 6.7.1
116     [...]
117     (gdb) break sys_ktrace
118     Breakpoint 1 at 0x80acf43: file ./machine/thread.h, line 83.
119     (gdb) 
120
121 Next we type 'c' in the gdb prompt to resume vkernel execution:
122
123     (gdb) c
124     Continuing.
125
126 Now we go to our vkernel and type the offending command:
127
128     # ktrace -c 
129
130 Gdb stops the execution of vkernel and a message pops up in gdb buffer:
131
132     Breakpoint 1, sys_ktrace (uap=0x573e2ca0) at ./machine/thread.h:83
133     83          __asm ("movl %%fs:globaldata,%0" : "=r" (gd) : "m"(__mycpu__dummy));
134     (gdb) 
135
136 We navigate through source code with the 'step' and 'next' gdb commands. They are identical, except that 'step' follows function calls. When we meet this call:
137
138     276                     allproc_scan(ktrace_clear_callback, &info);
139
140 we 'step' inside it. alloproc_scan() iterates through the process list and applies the ktrace_clear_callback() to each one of them.
141 Later we see this:
142
143     347                     if (p->p_tracenode->kn_vp == info->tracenode->kn_vp) {
144
145 Here p is a pointer to the current process:
146
147     (gdb) print p
148     $1 = (struct proc *) 0x57098c00
149
150 Let's see if this process is traced:
151
152     (gdb) print p->p_tracenode
153     $2 = (struct ktrace_node *) 0x0
154     (gdb) 
155
156 Oops. There is no trace to a vnode for this process. The code will try to access p->p_tracenode and is bound to crash. This is the zero virtual address we saw before.