newhandbook - add pages
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / newhandbook / Users / index.mdwn
1 # Users and Basic Account Management 
2
3 ***Contributed by Neil Blakey-Milner. ***
4
5
6
7 ## Synopsis 
8
9
10
11 DragonFly allows multiple users to use the computer at the same time. Obviously, only one of those users can be sitting in front of the screen and keyboard at any one time [(1)](#FTN.AEN6502), but any number of users can log in through the network to get their work done. To use the system every user must have an account.
12
13
14 After reading this chapter, you will know:
15
16
17 * The differences between the various user accounts on a DragonFly system.
18
19
20 * How to add user accounts.
21
22
23 * How to remove user accounts.
24
25
26 * How to change account details, such as the user's full name, or preferred shell.
27
28
29 * How to set limits on a per-account basis, to control the resources such as memory and CPU time that accounts and groups of accounts are allowed to access.
30
31
32 * How to use groups to make account management easier.
33
34
35
36 Before reading this chapter, you should:
37
38
39
40
41 * Understand the basics of UNIX® and DragonFly ([Chapter 3](basics.html)).
42
43
44
45 #### Notes 
46
47
48
49 [[!table  data="""
50 <tablestyle="width:100%"> [ (1)](users.html#AEN6502) | Well, unless you hook up multiple terminals, but we will save that for [ Chapter 17](serialcomms.html).
51  | |
52
53 """]]
54
55
56
57
58
59 CategoryHandbook
60
61 Category
62
63
64
65
66
67
68 ## Introduction 
69
70
71
72 All access to the system is achieved via accounts, and all processes are run by users, so user and account management are of integral importance on DragonFly systems.
73
74
75
76 Every account on a DragonFly system has certain information associated with it to identify the account.
77
78
79
80 * User name: The user name as it would be typed at the login: prompt. User names must be unique across the computer; you may not have two users with the same user name. There are a number of rules for creating valid user names, documented in [passwd(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=passwd&section=5); you would typically use user names that consist of eight or fewer all lower case characters.Password:: Each account has a password associated with it. The password may be blank, in which case no password will be required to access the system. This is normally a very bad idea; every account should have a password.
81
82 * User ID (UID): The UID is a number, traditionally from 0 to 65535[(1)](#FTN.USERS-LARGEUIDGID), used to uniquely identify the user to the system. Internally, DragonFly uses the UID to identify users--any DragonFly commands that allow you to specify a user name will convert it to the UID before working with it. This means that you can have several accounts with different user names but the same UID. As far as DragonFly is concerned, these accounts are one user. It is unlikely you will ever need to do this.
83
84 * Group ID (GID): The GID is a number, traditionally from 0 to 65535[users-introduction.html#FTN.USERS-LARGEUIDGID (1)], used to uniquely identify the primary group that the user belongs to. Groups are a mechanism for controlling access to resources based on a user's GID rather than their UID. This can significantly reduce the size of some configuration files. A user may also be in more than one group.
85
86 * Login class: Login classes are an extension to the group mechanism that provide additional flexibility when tailoring the system to different users.
87
88 * Password change time: By default DragonFly does not force users to change their passwords periodically. You can enforce this on a per-user basis, forcing some or all of your users to change their passwords after a certain amount of time has elapsed.
89
90 * Account expiry time: By default DragonFly does not expire accounts. If you are creating accounts that you know have a limited lifespan, for example, in a school where you have accounts for the students, then you can specify when the account expires. After the expiry time has elapsed the account cannot be used to log in to the system, although the account's directories and files will remain.
91
92 * User's full name: The user name uniquely identifies the account to DragonFly, but does not necessarily reflect the user's real name. This information can be associated with the account.
93
94 * Home directory: The home directory is the full path to a directory on the system in which the user will start when logging on to the system. A common convention is to put all user home directories under `/home/`***username***. The user would store their personal files in their home directory, and any directories they may create in there.
95
96 * User shell: The shell provides the default environment users use to interact with the system. There are many different kinds of shells, and experienced users will have their own preferences, which can be reflected in their account settings.
97
98
99
100 There are three main types of accounts: the [users-superuser.html Superuser], [users-system.html system users], and [users-user.html user accounts]. The Superuser account, usually called `root`, is used to manage the system with no limitations on privileges. System users run services. Finally, user accounts are used by real people, who log on, read mail, and so forth.
101
102
103
104 #### Notes 
105
106
107
108 [[!table  data="""
109 <tablestyle="width:100%"> [users-introduction.html#USERS-LARGEUIDGID (1)] | It is possible to use UID/GIDs as large as 4294967295, but such IDs can cause serious problems with software that makes assumptions about the values of IDs. |
110  | | 
111 """]]
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119 ## The Superuser Account 
120
121
122
123 The superuser account, usually called `root`, comes preconfigured to facilitate system administration, and should not be used for day-to-day tasks like sending and receiving mail, general exploration of the system, or programming.
124
125
126
127 This is because the superuser, unlike normal user accounts, can operate without limits, and misuse of the superuser account may result in spectacular disasters. User accounts are unable to destroy the system by mistake, so it is generally best to use normal user accounts whenever possible, unless you especially need the extra privilege.
128
129
130
131 You should always double and triple-check commands you issue as the superuser, since an extra space or missing character can mean irreparable data loss.
132
133
134
135 So, the first thing you should do after reading this chapter is to create an unprivileged user account for yourself for general usage if you have not already. This applies equally whether you are running a multi-user or single-user machine. Later in this chapter, we discuss how to create additional accounts, and how to change between the normal user and superuser.
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143 ## System Accounts 
144
145
146
147 System users are those used to run services such as DNS, mail, web servers, and so forth. The reason for this is security; if all services ran as the superuser, they could act without restriction.
148
149
150
151 Examples of system users are `daemon`, `operator`, `bind` (for the Domain Name Service), and `news`. Often sysadmins create `httpd` to run web servers they install.
152
153
154
155 `nobody` is the generic unprivileged system user. However, it is important to keep in mind that the more services that use `nobody`, the more files and processes that user will become associated with, and hence the more privileged that user becomes.
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167 ## User Accounts 
168
169
170
171 User accounts are the primary means of access for real people to the system, and these accounts insulate the user and the environment, preventing the users from damaging the system or other users, and allowing users to customize their environment without affecting others.
172
173
174
175 Every person accessing your system should have a unique user account. This allows you to find out who is doing what, prevent people from clobbering each others' settings or reading each others' mail, and so forth.
176
177
178
179 Each user can set up their own environment to accommodate their use of the system, by using alternate shells, editors, key bindings, and language.
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187 ## Modifying Accounts 
188
189
190
191 There are a variety of different commands available in the UNIX® environment to manipulate user accounts. The most common commands are summarized below, followed by more detailed examples of their usage.
192
193
194
195 [[!table  data="""
196 Command | Summary 
197  [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8) | The recommended command-line application for adding new users. 
198  [rmuser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=rmuser&section=8) | The recommended command-line application for removing users. 
199  [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1) | A flexible tool to change user database information. 
200  [passwd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=passwd&section=1) | The simple command-line tool to change user passwords. 
201  [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pw&section=8) | A powerful and flexible tool to modify all aspects of user accounts. |
202
203 """]]
204
205 ### adduser 
206
207
208
209 [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8) is a simple program for adding new users. It creates entries in the system `passwd` and `group` files. It will also create a home directory for the new user, copy in the default configuration files (***dotfiles***) from `/usr/share/skel`, and can optionally mail the new user a welcome message.
210
211
212
213 To create the initial configuration file, use `adduser -s -config_create`. [(1)](#FTN.AEN6699) Next, we configure [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8) defaults, and create our first user account, since using `root` for normal usage is evil and nasty.
214
215
216
217  **Example 8-1. Configuring `adduser` and adding a user** 
218
219    
220
221     # adduser -v
222
223     Use option -silent if you don't want to see all warnings and questions.
224
225     Check /etc/shells
226
227     Check /etc/master.passwd
228
229     Check /etc/group
230
231     Enter your default shell: csh date no sh tcsh zsh [sh]: zsh
232
233     Your default shell is: zsh -&gt; /usr/local/bin/zsh
234
235     Enter your default HOME partition: [/home]:
236
237     Copy dotfiles from: /usr/share/skel no [/usr/share/skel]:
238
239     Send message from file: /etc/adduser.message no
240
241     [/etc/adduser.message]: no
242
243     Do not send message
244
245     Use passwords (y/n) [y]: y
246
247     
248
249     Write your changes to /etc/adduser.conf? (y/n) [n]: y
250
251     
252
253     Ok, let's go.
254
255     Don't worry about mistakes. I will give you the chance later to correct any input.
256
257     Enter username [a-z0-9_-]: jru
258
259     Enter full name []: J. Random User
260
261     Enter shell csh date no sh tcsh zsh [zsh]:
262
263     Enter home directory (full path) [/home/jru]:
264
265     Uid [1001]:
266
267     Enter login class: default []:
268
269     Login group jru [jru]:
270
271     Login group is ***jru***. Invite jru into other groups: guest no
272
273     [no]: wheel
274
275     Enter password []:
276
277     Enter password again []:
278
279     
280
281     Name:         jru
282
283     Password: ****
284
285     Fullname: J. Random User
286
287     Uid:          1001
288
289     Gid:          1001 (jru)
290
291     Class:
292
293     Groups:       jru wheel
294
295     HOME:     /home/jru
296
297     Shell:        /usr/local/bin/zsh
298
299     OK? (y/n) [y]: y
300
301     Added user ***jru***
302
303     Copy files from /usr/share/skel to /home/jru
304
305     Add another user? (y/n) [y]: n
306
307     Goodbye!
308
309     #
310
311
312
313 In summary, we changed the default shell to  **zsh**  (an additional shell found in pkgsrc®), and turned off the sending of a welcome mail to added users. We then saved the configuration, created an account for `jru`, and made sure `jru` is in `wheel` group (so that she may assume the role of `root` with the [su(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=su&section=1) command.)
314
315
316  **Note:** The password you type in is not echoed, nor are asterisks displayed. Make sure you do not mistype the password twice.
317
318
319  **Note:** Just use [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8) without arguments from now on, and you will not have to go through changing the defaults. If the program asks you to change the defaults, exit the program, and try the `-s` option.
320
321
322
323 ### rmuser 
324
325
326
327 You can use [rmuser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=rmuser&section=8) to completely remove a user from the system. [rmuser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=rmuser&section=8) performs the following steps:
328
329
330
331   1. Removes the user's [crontab(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=crontab&section=1) entry (if any).
332
333   1. Removes any [at(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=at&section=1) jobs belonging to the user.
334
335   1. Kills all processes owned by the user.
336
337   1. Removes the user from the system's local password file.
338
339   1. Removes the user's home directory (if it is owned by the user).
340
341   1. Removes the incoming mail files belonging to the user from `/var/mail`.
342
343   1. Removes all files owned by the user from temporary file storage areas such as `/tmp`.
344
345   1. Finally, removes the username from all groups to which it belongs in `/etc/group`.
346
347    **Note:** If a group becomes empty and the group name is the same as the username, the group is removed; this complements the per-user unique groups created by [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8).
348
349
350
351 [rmuser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=rmuser&section=8) cannot be used to remove superuser accounts, since that is almost always an indication of massive destruction.
352
353
354
355 By default, an interactive mode is used, which attempts to make sure you know what you are doing.
356
357
358
359  **Example 8-2. `rmuser` Interactive Account Removal** 
360
361
362
363     
364
365     # rmuser jru
366
367     Matching password entry:
368
369     jru:*:1001:1001::0:0:J. Random User:/home/jru:/usr/local/bin/zsh
370
371     Is this the entry you wish to remove? y
372
373     Remove user's home directory (/home/jru)? y
374
375     Updating password file, updating databases, done.
376
377     Updating group file: trusted (removing group jru -- personal group is empty) done.
378
379     Removing user's incoming mail file /var/mail/jru: done.
380
381     Removing files belonging to jru from /tmp: done.
382
383     Removing files belonging to jru from /var/tmp: done.
384
385     Removing files belonging to jru from /var/tmp/vi.recover: done.
386
387     #
388
389
390
391
392
393 ### chpass 
394
395
396
397 [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1) changes user database information such as passwords, shells, and personal information.
398
399
400 Only system administrators, as the superuser, may change other users' information and passwords with [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1).
401
402
403 When passed no options, aside from an optional username, [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1) displays an editor containing user information. When the user exists from the editor, the user database is updated with the new information.
404
405
406
407 ***'Example 8-3. Interactive `chpass` by Superuser***'
408
409
410
411     
412
413     #Changing user database information for jru.
414
415     Login: jru
416
417     Password: *
418
419     Uid [#]: 1001
420
421     Gid [# or name]: 1001
422
423     Change [month day year]:
424
425     Expire [month day year]:
426
427     Class:
428
429     Home directory: /home/jru
430
431     Shell: /usr/local/bin/zsh
432
433     Full Name: J. Random User
434
435     Office Location:
436
437     Office Phone:
438
439     Home Phone:
440
441     Other information:
442
443
444
445
446
447 The normal user can change only a small subset of this information, and only for themselves.
448
449
450
451  **Example 8-4. Interactive chpass by Normal User** 
452
453     
454
455     #Changing user database information for jru.
456
457     Shell: /usr/local/bin/zsh
458
459     Full Name: J. Random User
460
461     Office Location:
462
463     Office Phone:
464
465     Home Phone:
466
467     Other information:
468
469
470
471
472
473  **Note:** [chfn(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chfn&section=1) and [chsh(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chsh&section=1) are just links to [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1), as are [ypchpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ypchpass&section=1), [ypchfn(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ypchfn&section=1), and [ypchsh(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ypchsh&section=1). NIS support is automatic, so specifying the `yp` before the command is not necessary. If this is confusing to you, do not worry, NIS will be covered in [advanced-networking.html Chapter 19].
474
475
476
477 ### passwd 
478
479
480
481 [passwd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=passwd&section=1) is the usual way to change your own password as a user, or another user's password as the superuser.
482
483
484
485  **Note:** To prevent accidental or unauthorized changes, the original password must be entered before a new password can be set.
486
487
488
489  **Example 8-5. Changing Your Password** 
490
491
492
493     
494
495     % passwd
496
497     Changing local password for jru.
498
499     Old password:
500
501     New password:
502
503     Retype new password:
504
505     passwd: updating the database...
506
507     passwd: done
508
509
510
511
512
513 ***'Example 8-6. Changing Another User's Password as the Superuser***'
514
515
516
517     
518
519     # passwd jru
520
521     Changing local password for jru.
522
523     New password:
524
525     Retype new password:
526
527     passwd: updating the database...
528
529     passwd: done
530
531
532
533
534
535  **Note:** As with [chpass(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=chpass&section=1), [yppasswd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=yppasswd&section=1) is just a link to [passwd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=passwd&section=1), so NIS works with either command.
536
537
538
539 ### pw 
540
541
542
543 [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pw&section=8) is a command line utility to create, remove, modify, and display users and groups. It functions as a front end to the system user and group files. [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pw&section=8) has a very powerful set of command line options that make it suitable for use in shell scripts, but new users may find it more complicated than the other commands presented here.
544
545
546
547 #### Notes 
548
549
550
551 [[!table  data="""
552 <tablestyle#"width:100%"> [(1)](users-modifying.html#AEN6699) | The `-s` makes [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=adduser&section=8) default to quiet. We use `-v` later when we want to change defaults. |
553 | | 
554 """]]
555
556
557
558
559
560 CategoryHandbook
561
562 CategoryHandbook-usermanagement
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570 ## Limiting Users 
571
572 <!-- XXX: check this section, I got the feeling there might be something outdated in it. I'm not familiar with it -->
573
574 If you have users, the ability to limit their system use may have come to mind. DragonFly provides several ways an administrator can limit the amount of system resources an individual may use. These limits are divided into two sections: disk quotas, and other resource limits.
575
576
577
578 Disk quotas limit disk usage to users, and they provide a way to quickly check that usage without calculating it every time. Quotas are discussed in [quotas.html Section 12.12].
579
580
581
582 The other resource limits include ways to limit the amount of CPU, memory, and other resources a user may consume. These are defined using login classes and are discussed here.
583
584
585
586 Login classes are defined in `/etc/login.conf`. The precise semantics are beyond the scope of this section, but are described in detail in the [login.conf(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=login.conf&section=5) manual page. It is sufficient to say that each user is assigned to a login class (`default` by default), and that each login class has a set of login capabilities associated with it. A login capability is a `name=value` pair, where `name` is a well-known identifier and `value` is an arbitrary string processed accordingly depending on the name. Setting up login classes and capabilities is rather straight-forward and is also described in [login.conf(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=login.conf&section=5).
587
588
589
590 Resource limits are different from plain vanilla login capabilities in two ways. First, for every limit, there is a soft (current) and hard limit. A soft limit may be adjusted by the user or application, but may be no higher than the hard limit. The latter may be lowered by the user, but never raised. Second, most resource limits apply per process to a specific user, not the user as a whole. Note, however, that these differences are mandated by the specific handling of the limits, not by the implementation of the login capability framework (i.e., they are not ***really*** a special case of login capabilities).
591
592
593
594 And so, without further ado, below are the most commonly used resource limits (the rest, along with all the other login capabilities, may be found in [login.conf(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=login.conf&section=5)).
595
596
597
598
599 * `coredumpsize`: The limit on the size of a core file generated by a program is, for obvious reasons, subordinate to other limits on disk usage (e.g., `filesize`, or disk quotas). Nevertheless, it is often used as a less-severe method of controlling disk space consumption: since users do not generate core files themselves, and often do not delete them, setting this may save them from running out of disk space should a large program (e.g.,  **emacs** ) crash.
600
601
602 * `cputime`: This is the maximum amount of CPU time a user's process may consume. Offending processes will be killed by the kernel.
603
604  **Note:** This is a limit on CPU ***time*** consumed, not percentage of the CPU as displayed in some fields by [top(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=top&section=1) and [ps(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ps&section=1). A limit on the latter is, at the time of this writing, not possible, and would be rather useless: legitimate use of a compiler, for instance, can easily use almost 100% of a CPU for some time.
605
606
607 * `filesize`: This is the maximum size of a file the user may possess. Unlike [quotas.html disk quotas], this limit is enforced on individual files, not the set of all files a user owns.
608
609
610 * `maxproc`: This is the maximum number of processes a user may be running. This includes foreground and background processes alike. For obvious reasons, this may not be larger than the system limit specified by the `kern.maxproc` [sysctl(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=sysctl&section=8). Also note that setting this too small may hinder a user's productivity: it is often useful to be logged in multiple times or execute pipelines. Some tasks, such as compiling a large program, also spawn multiple processes (e.g., [make(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=make&section=1), [cc(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=cc&section=1), and other intermediate preprocessors).
611
612
613 * `memorylocked`: This is the maximum amount a memory a process may have requested to be locked into main memory (e.g., see [mlock(2)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mlock&section2)). Some system-critical programs, such as [amd(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=amd&section=8), lock into main memory such that in the event of being swapped out, they do not contribute to a system's trashing in time of trouble.
614
615
616 * `memoryuse`: This is the maximum amount of memory a process may consume at any given time. It includes both core memory and swap usage. This is not a catch-all limit for restricting memory consumption, but it is a good start.
617
618
619 * `openfiles`: This is the maximum amount of files a process may have open. In DragonFly, files are also used to represent sockets and IPC channels; thus, be careful not to set this too low. The system-wide limit for this is defined by the `kern.maxfiles` [sysctl(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=sysctl&section=8).
620
621
622 * `sbsize`: This is the limit on the amount of network memory, and thus mbufs, a user may consume. This originated as a response to an old DoS attack by creating a lot of sockets, but can be generally used to limit network communications.
623
624
625 * `stacksize`: This is the maximum size a process' stack may grow to. This alone is not sufficient to limit the amount of memory a program may use; consequently, it should be used in conjunction with other limits.
626
627
628
629 There are a few other things to remember when setting resource limits. Following are some general tips, suggestions, and miscellaneous comments.
630
631
632
633
634 * Processes started at system startup by `/etc/rc` are assigned to the `daemon` login class.
635
636
637 * Although the `/etc/login.conf` that comes with the system is a good source of reasonable values for most limits, only you, the administrator, can know what is appropriate for your system. Setting a limit too high may open your system up to abuse, while setting it too low may put a strain on productivity.
638
639
640 * Users of the X Window System (X11) should probably be granted more resources than other users. X11 by itself takes a lot of resources, but it also encourages users to run more programs simultaneously.
641
642
643 * Remember that many limits apply to individual processes, not the user as a whole. For example, setting `openfiles` to 50 means that each process the user runs may open up to 50 files. Thus, the gross amount of files a user may open is the value of `openfiles` multiplied by the value of `maxproc`. This also applies to memory consumption.
644
645
646
647 For further information on resource limits and login classes and capabilities in general, please consult the relevant manual pages: [cap_mkdb(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cap_mkdb&section1), [getrlimit(2)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=getrlimit&section=2), [login.conf(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=login.conf&section=5).
648
649
650
651
652
653
654
655
656 ## Personalizing Users 
657
658
659
660 Localization is an environment set up by the system administrator or user to accommodate different languages, character sets, date and time standards, and so on. This is discussed in [this chapter](l10n.html).
661
662
663
664 ## Groups 
665
666
667
668 A group is simply a list of users. Groups are identified by their group name and GID (Group ID). In DragonFly (and most other UNIX® like systems), the two factors the kernel uses to decide whether a process is allowed to do something is its user ID and list of groups it belongs to. Unlike a user ID, a process has a list of groups associated with it. You may hear some things refer to the ***group ID*** of a user or process; most of the time, this just means the first group in the list.
669
670
671
672 The group name to group ID map is in `/etc/group`. This is a plain text file with four colon-delimited fields. The first field is the group name, the second is the encrypted password, the third the group ID, and the fourth the comma-delimited list of members. It can safely be edited by hand (assuming, of course, that you do not make any syntax errors!). For a more complete description of the syntax, see the [group(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#group&section5) manual page.
673
674
675
676 If you do not want to edit `/etc/group` manually, you can use the [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#pw&section8) command to add and edit groups. For example, to add a group called `teamtwo` and then confirm that it exists you can use:
677
678
679
680  **Example 8-7. Adding a Group Using pw(8)** 
681
682
683
684     
685
686     # pw groupadd teamtwo
687
688     # pw groupshow teamtwo
689
690     teamtwo:*:1100:
691
692
693
694
695
696 The number `1100` above is the group ID of the group `teamtwo`. Right now, `teamtwo` has no members, and is thus rather useless. Let's change that by inviting `jru` to the `teamtwo` group.
697
698
699
700  **Example 8-8. Adding Somebody to a Group Using pw(8)** 
701
702
703
704     
705
706     # pw groupmod teamtwo -M jru
707
708     # pw groupshow teamtwo
709
710     teamtwo:*:1100:jru
711
712
713
714
715
716 The argument to the `-M` option is a comma-delimited list of users who are members of the group. From the preceding sections, we know that the password file also contains a group for each user. The latter (the user) is automatically added to the group list by the system; the user will not show up as a member when using the `groupshow` command to [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#pw&section8), but will show up when the information is queried via [id(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=id&section=1) or similar tool. In other words, [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=pw&section=8) only manipulates the `/etc/group` file; it will never attempt to read additionally data from `/etc/passwd`.
717
718
719
720  **Example 8-9. Using id(1) to Determine Group Membership** 
721
722
723
724     
725
726     % id jru
727
728     uid#1001(jru) gid1001(jru) groups=1001(jru), 1100(teamtwo)
729
730
731
732
733
734 As you can see, `jru` is a member of the groups `jru` and `teamtwo`.
735
736
737
738 For more information about [pw(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#pw&section8), see its manual page, and for more information on the format of `/etc/group`, consult the [group(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=group&section=5) manual page.
739
740
741
742