Updated copyright year
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / developer / C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_1_C_For_Beginners.mdwn
index 1a65488..18b61ed 100644 (file)
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ This chapter should be a breeze-through of the following chapters, touching on s
 
 
 
-In this chapter, we will walk through the C language, touching on some of the more important features of the language. After reading this chapter, you should be superficially familiar with the [syntax](/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes) of the C language as well as the aesthetical organization of source code within programs. 
+In this chapter, we will walk through the C language, touching on some of the more important features of the language. After reading this chapter, you should be superficially familiar with the [syntax](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index1h1) of the C language as well as the aesthetical organization of source code within programs. 
 
 
 
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ While this is one of the most basic C programs that can be written, there are ma
 
 
 
-The first line in this program is a [comment](/C_Book_Glossary). In C, comments are declared in between the symbol combinations `/*` and `*/`; they are not compiled and are only useful to inform persons reading the source code of what is happening in the code. We'll talk more about them in our next example. 
+The first line in this program is a [comment](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index5h3). In C, comments are declared in between the symbol combinations `/*` and `*/`; they are not compiled and are only useful to inform persons reading the source code of what is happening in the code. We'll talk more about them in our next example. 
 
 
 
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ The first line in this program is a [comment](/C_Book_Glossary). In C, comments
 
 
 
-Since C is such a small language, it's pretty unuseful by itself. DragonFly BSD provides an implementation of the [standard library](/C_Book_Glossary), which contains a number of useful functions. [Header Files](/C_Book_Glossary) contain definitions of functions, structures, and other interface portions of a program. In this case, we're telling the compiler to load the header file containing definitions for standard input and output routines. We use the file `stdio.h` because it provides the definition of the function `printf()`, which we use later in the program. 
+Since C is such a small language, it's pretty unuseful by itself. DragonFly BSD provides an implementation of the [standard library](/C_Book_Glossary), which contains a number of useful functions. [Header Files](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index1h1) contain definitions of functions, structures, and other interface portions of a program. In this case, we're telling the compiler to load the header file containing definitions for standard input and output routines. We use the file `stdio.h` because it provides the definition of the function `printf()`, which we use later in the program. 
 
 
 
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ This is the definition of the `main` function, and there are several things that
 
 
 
-The [modifier](/C_Book_Glossary) is an optional keyword which specifies (modifies) the function type. [type](/C_Book_Glossary) refers to the variable type that should be returned by the function. `Functionname` is any valid C language variable name. The list of parameters that should be passed to the function are given in a comma-delimited format in the `parameterlist`. 
+The [modifier](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index15h3) is an optional keyword which specifies (modifies) the function type.  [Type](/C_Book_Glossary) refers to the variable type that should be returned by the function. `Functionname` is any valid C language variable name. The list of parameters that should be passed to the function are given in a comma-delimited format in the `parameterlist`. 
 
 
 
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ This is the body of the main function. All function bodies must be contained bet
 
 
 
-The function printf is provided in the standard library, and is used to print formatted output to the standard output (usually a monitor, console, or terminal session). In this case, we're asking it to print the [string](/C_Book_Glossary), "Hello, World!\n" to the standard output. If you were to actually run this program, you would notice the following output: 
+The function printf is provided in the standard library, and is used to print formatted output to the standard output (usually a monitor, console, or terminal session). In this case, we're asking it to print the [string](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index1h1), "Hello, World!\n" to the standard output. If you were to actually run this program, you would notice the following output: 
 
 
 
@@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ Since we defined the `main` function as a function returning an integer, we must
 
 
 
-You may be wondering where this value is returned - after all, the `main` function signifies the beginning of the program, so why do we need to return something from it? There's nothing calling our program, is there? In fact, there is, but this is outside the scope of this section. This will be discussed later in the book, but if you absolutely can't wait to find out, please see the Glossary entry on the [return](/C_Book_Glossary) keyword. 
+You may be wondering where this value is returned - after all, the `main` function signifies the beginning of the program, so why do we need to return something from it? There's nothing calling our program, is there? In fact, there is, but this is outside the scope of this section. This will be discussed later in the book, but if you absolutely can't wait to find out, please see the Glossary entry on the [return](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index1h1) keyword. 
 
 
 
@@ -540,7 +540,7 @@ The `while` loop checks the condition  **before**  it executes any statements, s
 
 
 
-Arrays are arrangements of variables of the same [type](/C_Book_Glossary). 
+Arrays are arrangements of variables of the same [type](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index1h1). 
 
 
 
@@ -866,7 +866,7 @@ that should go somewhere but needs to find a good place:
 
 
 
-The C syntax is a combination of [keywords](/C_Book_Glossary), [operators](/C_Book_Glossary), variables and symbols to determine program content and flow. 
+The C syntax is a combination of [keywords](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index13h3), [operators](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index17h3), variables and symbols to determine program content and flow.