Remove broken opengrok links
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / newhandbook / environmentquickstart / index.mdwn
index e6d3845..3ca4b67 100644 (file)
@@ -2,19 +2,18 @@
 
 This QuickStart is part of the [[NewHandbook|/docs/newhandbook/]].
 
-This document describes the DragonFly environment one will find on a newly installed system.  While you are getting started please pay careful attention to the version or level of DragonFly that the documentation was written for.  Some documentation on this site may be out of date. Watch for the marker `(obsolete)` on items that are out of date or need updating.
+This document describes the DragonFly environment one will find on a newly installed system.  While you are getting started, please pay careful attention to the version or level of DragonFly that the documentation was written for.  Some documentation on this site may be out of date. Watch for the marker `(obsolete)` on items that are out of date or need updating.
 
 
 [[!toc levels=3 ]]
 ## Some Unix and BSD Fundamentals
 
-If you have used another Unix flavor, another BSD or Linux before, you may need to spend some time learning basic subjects.  If you have never used any flavor of Unix, BSD or otherwise, and have only used Windows before, please be prepared for a lengthy period of learning.
+If you have used another Unix flavour, another BSD, or Linux before, you may need to spend some time learning the differences between DragonFly and the system you are experienced in.  If you have never used any flavor of Unix, BSD or otherwise, and have only used Windows before, please be prepared for a lengthy period of learning.
 
-If you already know your way around a Unix filesystem, and already know what the `/etc` folder is, how to use `vi` or `vim` to edit a file, how to use a shell like `tcsh` or `bash`, how to configure that shell, or change what shell you're using, how `su` and `sudo` work, and what a `root` account is, then you may get a lot farther in using any BSD variant (like Dragonfly BSD) then the rest of this page may be enough to orient you to your surroundings.
+If you already know your way around a Unix filesystem, and already know what the `/etc` folder is, how to use `vi` or `vim` to edit a file, how to use a shell like `tcsh` or `bash`, how to configure that shell, or change what shell you're using, how `su` and `sudo` work, and what a `root` account is, the rest of this page may be enough to orient you to your surroundings.
 
 You should understand everything in the [[Unix Basics|/docs/newhandbook/UnixBasics/]] section before you proceed with trying to use your new system.
 
-
 ## Disk layout of a New Dragonfly BSD System using the HAMMER filesystem
 
 If you chose to install on the HAMMER file system during installation you will be left with a system with the following disk configuration:
@@ -38,7 +37,7 @@ In this example
 * `/dev/serno/9VMBWDM1` is the hard disk specified with serial number,
 * `/dev/serno/9VMBWDM1.s1` is the first slice on the hard disk.
 
-The disklabel looks at follows
+The disk label looks as follows:
 
     # disklabel /dev/serno/9VMBWDM1.s1
 
@@ -79,13 +78,13 @@ The slice has 3 partitions:
 * `b` - for swap
 * `d` - for `/`, a HAMMER file system labeled ROOT
 
-When you create a HAMMER file system you must give it a label, here the installer labeled it as "ROOT" and mounted it as
+When you create a HAMMER file system, you must give it a label.  Here, the installer labelled it as "ROOT" and mounted it as
 
     ROOT                      288G    12G   276G     4%    /
 
-A PFS is a Pseudo File System inside a HAMMER file system. The HAMMER file system in which the PFSes are created is referred to as the root file system. You should not confuse the "root" file system with the Label "ROOT", the label can be anything. It is just that the installer labeled it as ROOT because it is mounted as `/`.
+A PFS is a Pseudo File System inside a HAMMER file system. The HAMMER file system in which the PFSes are created is referred to as the root file system. You should not confuse the "root" file system with the label "ROOT": the label can be anything. The installer labeled it as ROOT because it is mounted at `/`.
 
-Now inside the ROOT HAMMER file system you find the installed created 7 PFSes from the `df -h` output above, let us see how they are mounted in `/etc/fstab`:
+Now inside the root HAMMER file system you find the installer created 7 PFSes from the `df -h` output above, let us see how they are mounted in `/etc/fstab`:
 
     # cat /etc/fstab
 
@@ -103,11 +102,11 @@ Now inside the ROOT HAMMER file system you find the installed created 7 PFSes fr
     proc                    /proc           procfs  rw              0       0
 
 
-The PFSes are mounted using a NULL mount because they are also HAMMER file systems. You can read more on NULL mounts here [mount_null(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mount_null&section=8).
+The PFSes are mounted using a NULL mount because they are also HAMMER file systems. You can read more on NULL mounts at the [mount_null(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mount_null&section=8) manpage.
 
-You don't need to specify a size for the PFSes like you do for logical volumes inside a volume group for LVM. All the free space in the root HAMMER file system is available to all the PFSs. That is the reason in the `df -h` output above you saw free space is same for all PFSes and the root HAMMER file system.
+You don't need to specify a size for the PFSes like you do for logical volumes inside a volume group for LVM. All the free space in the root HAMMER file system is available to all the PFSes; it can be seen in the `df -h` output above that the free space is the same for all PFSes and the root HAMMER file system.
 
-Now if you look in `/var`
+If you look in `/var`
 
     # cd /var/
     # ls
@@ -130,13 +129,13 @@ If you look at the status of one of the PFSes, e.g. `/usr` you will see `/var/ha
         snapshots directory defaults to /var/hammer/<pfs>
     }
 
-There is no "hammer" directory in `/var` now. That is because no snapshots are yet taken. You can verify this by checking the snapshots available for `/usr`
+At installation time, it will be seen that there is no `hammer` directory in `/var`. The reason for this is that no snapshots have yet been taken. You can verify this by checking the snapshots available for `/usr`
 
     # hammer snapls /usr
     Snapshots on /usr       PFS #3
     Transaction ID          Timestamp               Note
 
-Snapshots will appear automatically each night as the system performs housekeeping on the Hammer filesystem.  For a new volume, an immediate snapshot can be taken by running the command 'hammer cleanup'.  Among other activites, it will take a snapshot of the filesystem.
+Snapshots will appear automatically each night as the system performs housekeeping on the Hammer filesystem.  For a new volume, an immediate snapshot can be taken by running the command 'hammer cleanup'.  Among other activities, it will take a snapshot of the filesystem.
 
     # sudo hammer cleanup
     cleanup /                    - HAMMER UPGRADE: Creating snapshots
@@ -164,10 +163,9 @@ Snapshots will appear automatically each night as the system performs housekeepi
     cleanup /var/isos            - HAMMER UPGRADE: Creating snapshots
     [...]
 
-No snapshots were taken for `/tmp`, `/usr/obj` and `/var/tmp`. This is because the PFSes are flagged as `nohistory`. HAMMER tracks history for all files in a PFS, naturally this consumes disk space until the history is pruned. To prevent that temporary files on the mentioned PFSes (e.g., object files, crash dumps) consume disk space, the PFSes are marked as `nohistory`.
-
-In `/var` will be a new directory called *hammer* with the following sub directories
+No snapshots were taken for `/tmp`, `/usr/obj` and `/var/tmp`. This is because the PFSes are flagged as `nohistory`. HAMMER tracks history for all files in a PFS.  Naturally, this consumes disk space until  history is pruned, at which point the available disk space will stabilise. To prevent temporary files on the mentioned PFSes (e.g., object files, crash dumps) from consuming disk space, the PFSes are marked as `nohistory`.
 
+After performing nightly housekeeping, a new directory called *hammer* will be found in `/var` with the following sub directories:
 
     # cd hammer/
     # ls -l
@@ -179,8 +177,7 @@ In `/var` will be a new directory called *hammer* with the following sub directo
     drwxr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  0 Oct 13 11:54 var
 
 
-Well let us look inside `/var/hammer/usr`
-
+Looking inside `/var/hammer/usr`, one finds:
 
     # cd usr/
     # ls -l
@@ -191,15 +188,13 @@ Well let us look inside `/var/hammer/usr`
 
 We have a symlink pointing to the snapshot transaction ID shown below.
 
-
     # hammer snapls /usr
     Snapshots on /usr       PFS #3
     Transaction ID          Timestamp               Note
     0x0000000117ac6cb0      2010-10-13 11:43:04 IST -
     #
 
-
-You can read more about snapshots, prune, reblance, reblock, recopy etc from [hammer(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=hammer&section=8) especially look under the heading "cleanup [filesystem ...]"
+You can read more about snapshots, prune, reblance, reblock, recopy etc from [hammer(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=hammer&section=8).  Make especially sure to look under the heading "cleanup [filesystem ...]".
 
 You can learn more about PFS mirroring [here](http://www.dragonflybsd.org/docs/how_to_implement_hammer_pseudo_file_system__40___pfs___41___slave_mirroring_from_pfs_master/)
 
@@ -224,7 +219,7 @@ In order to correctly map hard disk sernos to device names you can use the 'deva
     Device ad3s1b:
     Device ad3s1d:
 
-Or if your disks are 'da', just change it as appropiate.
+If your disks are 'da', change as appropriate.
 
 ## Configuring and Starting the SSH Server
 
@@ -232,41 +227,13 @@ Described in detail [[here|/docs/newhandbook/sshserver/]]
 
 ## Software/Programs and Configuration Files Location 
 
-DragonFly default installation contains the base software/programs from the DragonFly project itself and few other software from other sources. 
+The DragonFly default installation contains the base software/programs from the DragonFly project itself and additional software from other sources. 
 
 The base system binary software programs are located in the folders 
 
     /bin    /sbin
     /usr/bin   /usr/sbin
 
-The configuration files for the base system can be found in `/etc`. There is also `/usr/local/etc` which is used by third-party programs.
+The configuration files for the base system can be found in `/etc`. Third-party programs use `/usr/local/etc`.
 
 There are several different ways to install software and which version you use depends on which DragonFly BSD version you have.  You can compile things from source code, or you can use binary packages.
-
-
-## Installing Third-party Software
-
-Have a look at the [[dports howto|/docs/howtos/HowToDPorts/]] for an in-depth description about dealing with packaging systems. Note that DragonFly BSD has several older package managers (like `pkgin`), but that the most modern binary package installation system as of 2014, is `pkg`.
-
-### Using pkg
-
-Read [[dports howto|/docs/howtos/HowToDPorts/]] then for some errata, read [[this|http://lists.dragonflybsd.org/pipermail/users/2013-November/090339.html]].
-
-
-You can look at the help and the man page for the pkg tool like this:
-
-`pkg help install`
-
-Example: Read man page for pkg-install
-
-`man pkg-install`
-
-
-### Installing an X desktop environment
-
-If it's already on your system run X by typing `startx`. If it's not, install
-it using `pkg install`.
-
-`(obsolete)`
-Slightly out of date instructions on installing a GUI (X desktop) environment  are in the [new handbook](http://www.dragonflybsd.org/docs/newhandbook/X/).
-