strike the whole X window page out
[ikiwiki.git] / docs / developer / C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_1_C_For_Beginners.mdwn
index 1e44806..c21ab38 100644 (file)
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ This is the definition of the `main` function, and there are several things that
 
 
 
-The [modifier](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index15h3) is an optional keyword which specifies (modifies) the function type. [type](/C_Book_Glossary) refers to the variable type that should be returned by the function. `Functionname` is any valid C language variable name. The list of parameters that should be passed to the function are given in a comma-delimited format in the `parameterlist`. 
+The [modifier](/docs/developer/C_Development_Under_DragonFly_BSD-Volume_7_Glossary_and_Tables_for_all_Volumes/#index15h3) is an optional keyword which specifies (modifies) the function type.  [Type](/C_Book_Glossary) refers to the variable type that should be returned by the function. `Functionname` is any valid C language variable name. The list of parameters that should be passed to the function are given in a comma-delimited format in the `parameterlist`. 
 
 
 
@@ -544,7 +544,7 @@ Arrays are arrangements of variables of the same [type](/docs/developer/C_Develo
 
 
 
-A good example of a simple array is a word, where each character of this word is a single variable of the type `char`, with it's own fixed place.
+A good example of a simple array is a word, where each character of this word is a single variable of the type `char`, with its own fixed place.
 
 For example the word `Dragon` is an array of chars, with a length of six. We can create it as follows:
 
@@ -554,7 +554,7 @@ For example the word `Dragon` is an array of chars, with a length of six. We can
 
 
 
-The number inside the brackets indicates the amount of variables the array is made up of. Each single character has it's own place and thus each place has an address whereby we can reach it. `D` is at the first position in the word `Dragon`, and because most programming languages start counting at zero, `D` can be found at `my_array_name[0]`, whereas `r` is stored at `my_array_name[1]`, and the last character of `Dragon`, `n` resides at `my_array_name[5]`. 
+The number inside the brackets indicates the amount of variables the array is made up of. Each single character has its own place and thus each place has an address whereby we can reach it. `D` is at the first position in the word `Dragon`, and because most programming languages start counting at zero, `D` can be found at `my_array_name[0]`, whereas `r` is stored at `my_array_name[1]`, and the last character of `Dragon`, `n` resides at `my_array_name[5]`.