Clean up the configuration a bit
authorluxh <luxh@web>
Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:58:06 +0000 (12:58 -0700)
committerCharlie Root <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Tue, 12 Jun 2012 19:58:06 +0000 (12:58 -0700)
docs/newhandbook/X/index.mdwn

index c996940..9d791eb 100644 (file)
@@ -87,79 +87,70 @@ Alternatively, X11 can be installed directly from pre built packages with [pkg_r
 
 
 
-### Before Starting 
 
 
+As of version 7.3, Xorg can often work without any configuration file by simply typing at prompt:
 
-Before configuration of X11 the following information about the target system is needed:
-
-
-
-
-* Monitor specifications
-
-
-* Video Adapter chipset
-
+    
 
-* Video Adapter memory
+    % startx
 
 
 
-The specifications for the monitor are used by X11 to determine the resolution and refresh rate to run at. These specifications can usually be obtained from the documentation that came with the monitor or from the manufacturer's website. There are two ranges of numbers that are needed, the horizontal scan rate and the vertical synchronization rate.
 
+If this does not work, or if the default configuration is not acceptable, then X11 must be configured manually. Configuration of X11 is a multi-step process. The first step is to build an initial configuration file. As the super user, simply run:
 
+   
 
-The video adapter's chipset defines what driver module X11 uses to talk to the graphics hardware. With most chipsets, this can be automatically determined, but it is still useful to know in case the automatic detection does not work correctly.
+    # Xorg -configure
 
 
+This will generate an X11 configuration skeleton file in the `/root` directory called `xorg.conf.new` (whether you [su(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=su&amp;section=1) or do a direct login affects the inherited supervisor `$HOME` directory variable). The X11 program will attempt to probe the graphics hardware on the system and write a configuration file to load the proper drivers for the detected hardware on the target system.
 
-Video memory on the graphic adapter determines the resolution and color depth which the system can run at. This is important to know so the user knows the limitations of the system.
 
 
+The next step is to test the existing configuration to verify that  **X.org**  can work with the graphics hardware on the target system. To perform this task, type:
 
-### Configuring X11 
+   
 
+    # Xorg -config xorg.conf.new
 
 
-As of version 7.3, Xorg can often work without any configuration file by simply typing at prompt:
+If a black and grey grid and an X mouse cursor appear, the configuration was successful. To exit the test, just press  **Ctrl** + **Alt** + **Backspace**  simultaneously.
 
-    
 
-    % startx
 
+**Note:** If the mouse does not work, you will need to first configure it before proceeding. This can usually be achieved by just using `/dev/sysmouse` as the input device in the config file and enabling `moused`:
 
+       # rcenable moused
 
+**Note** http://technoninja.blogspot.com/2010/07/dragonflybsd-mouse-wtf-problem-fix.html
 
-If this does not work, or if the default configuration is not acceptable, then X11 must be configured manually. Configuration of X11 is a multi-step process. The first step is to build an initial configuration file. As the super user, simply run:
+Next, you may need the following information about the target system:
 
-   
 
-    # Xorg -configure
 
+* Monitor specifications
 
-This will generate an X11 configuration skeleton file in the `/root` directory called `xorg.conf.new` (whether you [su(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=su&amp;section=1) or do a direct login affects the inherited supervisor `$HOME` directory variable). The X11 program will attempt to probe the graphics hardware on the system and write a configuration file to load the proper drivers for the detected hardware on the target system.
 
+* Video Adapter chipset
 
 
-The next step is to test the existing configuration to verify that  **X.org**  can work with the graphics hardware on the target system. To perform this task, type:
+* Video Adapter memory
 
-   
 
-    # Xorg -config xorg.conf.new
 
+The specifications for the monitor are used by X11 to determine the resolution and refresh rate to run at. These specifications can usually be obtained from the documentation that came with the monitor or from the manufacturer's website. There are two ranges of numbers that are needed, the horizontal scan rate and the vertical synchronization rate.
 
-If a black and grey grid and an X mouse cursor appear, the configuration was successful. To exit the test, just press  **Ctrl** + **Alt** + **Backspace**  simultaneously.
 
 
+The video adapter's chipset defines what driver module X11 uses to talk to the graphics hardware. With most chipsets, this can be automatically determined, but it is still useful to know in case the automatic detection does not work correctly.
 
-**Note:** If the mouse does not work, you will need to first configure it before proceeding. This can usually be achieved by just using `/dev/sysmouse` as the input device in the config file and enabling `moused`:
 
-       # rcenable moused
 
-**Note** http://technoninja.blogspot.com/2010/07/dragonflybsd-mouse-wtf-problem-fix.html
+Video memory on the graphic adapter determines the resolution and color depth which the system can run at. This is important to know so the user knows the limitations of the system.
 
-Next, tune the `xorg.conf.new` configuration file to taste. Open the file in a text editor such as [vi(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=vi&section=1) or [ee(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ee&amp;section=1). First, add the frequencies for the target system's monitor. These are usually expressed as a horizontal and vertical synchronization rate. These values are added to the `xorg.conf.new` file under the `"Monitor"` section:
+Tune the `xorg.conf.new` configuration file to taste. Open the file in a text editor such as [vi(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=vi&section=1) or [ee(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ee&amp;section=1). First, add the frequencies for the target system's monitor. These are usually expressed as a horizontal and vertical synchronization rate. These values are added to the `xorg.conf.new` file under the `"Monitor"` section: