Correction of the note links
authorsrussell <srussell@web>
Wed, 9 Mar 2011 03:57:15 +0000 (19:57 -0800)
committerCharlie <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Wed, 9 Mar 2011 03:57:15 +0000 (19:57 -0800)
docs/howtos/howtoporttodragonfly/index.mdwn

index d86db11..4ed359f 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ Suppose you would want to modify the application foo/bar from the pkgsrc collect
 
 This will restore the changes previously made, which will be a good starting point for the porting. The bmake command could also be used without options to attempt an immediate first compilation. But you might have to change some files first, like the GNU scripts for example.
 
-Suppose that the foo application of the collection is version 1.0. Let's go into the newly extracted source directory located right here<a name="AEN1" href="vkernel.shtml#FTN.AEN1">[1]</a>:
+Suppose that the foo application of the collection is version 1.0. Let's go into the newly extracted source directory located right here<a name="AEN1" href="#FTN.AEN1">[1]</a>:
 
        cd /var/obj/pkgsrc/foo/bar/work/foo-1.0
 
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ An initial change might be to scan the definitions for the other BSD variants, a
 
 ### GNU Tools definition
 
-Porting code can focus on identifying available functions rather than on identifying host systems. A typical case would be the bcopy function, normally used instead of strcpy on BSD derivatives. Rather than referring to the host system, the code might look like this (from the GNU Autobook<a name="AEN2" href="vkernel.shtml#FTN.AEN2">[2]</a>):
+Porting code can focus on identifying available functions rather than on identifying host systems. A typical case would be the bcopy function, normally used instead of strcpy on BSD derivatives. Rather than referring to the host system, the code might look like this (from the GNU Autobook<a name="AEN2" href="#FTN.AEN2">[2]</a>):
 
        #if !HAVE_STRCPY
        #  if HAVE_BCOPY
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ This guarantees a form of compatibility between systems at the code level. Unfor
 
 ### The BSD4.4 Heritage
 
-Many developers are unaware that a BSD definition was created for BSD4.4 and it's derivatives, as DragonFly, FreeBSD and NetBSD. This definition is used like this (from pkgsrc developer's guide<a name="AEN3" href="vkernel.shtml#FTN.AEN3">[3]</a>):
+Many developers are unaware that a BSD definition was created for BSD4.4 and it's derivatives, as DragonFly, FreeBSD and NetBSD. This definition is used like this (from pkgsrc developer's guide<a name="AEN3" href="#FTN.AEN3">[3]</a>):
 
        #include <sys/param.h>
        #if (defined(BSD) && BSD >= 199306)
@@ -277,7 +277,7 @@ It is also possible to import new packages in pkgsrc-wip. See [http://pkgsrc-wip
   <tr>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP" width="5%">
         <a name="FTN.AEN1" 
-            href="vkernel.shtml#AEN1">[1]
+            href="#AEN1">[1]
         </a>
       </td>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">
@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ It is also possible to import new packages in pkgsrc-wip. See [http://pkgsrc-wip
   <tr>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP" width="5%">
         <a name="FTN.AEN2" 
-            href="vkernel.shtml#AEN2">[2]
+            href="#AEN2">[2]
         </a>
       </td>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ It is also possible to import new packages in pkgsrc-wip. See [http://pkgsrc-wip
   <tr>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP" width="5%">
         <a name="FTN.AEN3" 
-            href="vkernel.shtml#AEN3">[3]
+            href="#AEN3">[3]
         </a>
       </td>
       <td align="LEFT" valign="TOP">