Revert previous
authorBeket <Beket@web>
Thu, 12 Mar 2009 19:58:08 +0000 (12:58 -0700)
committerCharlie <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Thu, 12 Mar 2009 19:58:08 +0000 (12:58 -0700)
docs/howtos/HowToDebugVKernels/index.mdwn

index 7591ba0..23a4a45 100644 (file)
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ Quoting from vkernel(7):
 
 It is possible to directly gdb the virtual kernel's process.  It is recommended that you do a `handle SIGSEGV noprint' to ignore page faults processed by the virtual kernel itself and `handle SIGUSR1 noprint' to ignore signals used for simulating inter-processor interrupts (SMP build only).
 
-You can add these two commands in your `~/.gdbinit' to save yourself from typing them again and again.
+You can add these two commands in your ~/.gdbinit to save yourself from typing them again and again.
 
     $ cat ~/.gdbinit
     handle SIGSEGV noprint
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ Let's get a trace from inside gdb:
     (gdb) 
 
 Why does it differ from the ddb's trace ?
-Well, when the vkernel is sitting at a `db> prompt' all vkernel threads representing virtual cpu's except the one handling the db> prompt itself will be suspended in stopsig(). The backtrace only sees one of the N threads.
+Well, when the vkernel is sitting at a db> prompt all vkernel threads representing virtual cpu's except the one handling the db> prompt itself will be suspended in stopsig(). The backtrace only sees one of the N threads.
 
 We need to do better this time. Let's break into the kernel _before_ it crashes. sys_ktrace() seems like a good candidate.