trim is committed
authorsjg <sjg@web>
Mon, 19 Mar 2012 17:36:00 +0000 (10:36 -0700)
committerCharlie Root <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Mon, 19 Mar 2012 17:36:00 +0000 (10:36 -0700)
docs/developer/gsocprojectspage/index.mdwn

index 852f1e7..482eebe 100644 (file)
@@ -312,21 +312,6 @@ Meta information:
 
 ---
 
-##### ATA TRIM and filesystem/swap support
-* Some devices support an ATA command, 'TRIM', which marks disk blocks as 'not in use'; on SSDs, for example, not-in-use blocks can be used to support better wear leveling and to prevent performance degradation over time with fragmentation of the free block set.
-* DFly's BIO system supports BIO_DELETE commands; these commands are not tied to device level TRIM commands, however
-* Once BIO_DELETE commands are possible, it'd be very nice for DragonFly's swap code to generate BIO_DELETE commands for unused swap blocks (batch them!); this would would work well with SSDs and swapcache
-* HAMMER should also send BIO_DELETE commands to mark unused blocks unused. Running HAMMER on an SSD would be more pleasant then.
-* FreeBSD implemented this support on Jan 29th for UFS; it may serve as a good reference.
-
-Meta information:
-
-* Prerequisites: C, OS internals, a touch of file systems
-* Difficulty: Not too hard
-* Contact point: kernel@crater.dragonflybsd.org
-
----
-
 ##### Access to ktr(4) buffers via shared memory
 Our event tracing system, ktr(4), records interesting events in per-cpu buffers that are printed out with ktrdump(8). Currently, ktrdump uses libkvm to access these buffers, which is suboptimal. One can allow a sufficiently-privileged userspace process to map those buffers read-only and access them directly. For bonus points, design an extensible, discoverable (think reflection) mechanism that provides fast access via shared memory to data structures that the kernel chooses to expose to userland.