(no commit message)
authordillon <dillon@web>
Mon, 3 Sep 2018 01:27:27 +0000 (01:27 +0000)
committerIkiWiki <ikiwiki.info>
Mon, 3 Sep 2018 01:27:27 +0000 (01:27 +0000)
docs/handbook/docs/handbook/docs/newhandbook/ZenRipper/index.mdwn

index 385fb58..21fc6c3 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ In this menu you can enable XFR2 and then set the PPT (wattage), TDC and EDC (cu
 
 The PPT setting is very dangerous and must be specified with caution.  It's usually 30-100W lower than the actual power consumption at the wall.  If the BIOS specifies this field in mW, then start with 100W or so (100000).  If the BIOS specifies this field in W, then start with 100W (100).  Run your system at full load and check the actual amperage at the wall with a kill-a-watt meter.  Then adjust up or down according to your needs.  Be very careful and only increase in small increments.  Also note that if you specify too-low a PPT, the BIOS may not be able to post and require that you clear the cmos memory and start over.
 
-When overclocking you should only set a power envelope that your system cooling solution can handle and that your power supply can handle.  ALWAYS GIVE YOUR PSU TWICE THE HEADROOM AS THE ACTUAL POWER DRAW FROM THE WALL!   If you want to overclock a system to 400W, then you need an 800W power supply, period.  Do not run the system power close to the limits of the PSU.  All PSUs and mobos have overheat protection, but this is NOT a guarantee that such protection will save your system!  If you do overheat the system and the BIOS stops posting reliably, clear the CMOS and let the system cool down unplugged for 30 minutes before resuming.
+When overclocking you should only set a power envelope that your system cooling solution can handle and that your power supply can handle.  ALWAYS GIVE YOUR PSU TWICE THE HEADROOM AS THE ACTUAL POWER DRAW FROM THE WALL!   If you want to overclock a system to 400W, then you need an 800W power supply, period.  And you need cooling that can handle it, meaning at least water cooling.  Do not run the system power close to the limits of the PSU.  Do not run the CPU temps past 70C or so.  All PSUs and mobos have overheat protection, but this is NOT a guarantee that such protection will save your system!  If you do overheat the system and the BIOS stops posting reliably, clear the CMOS and let the system cool down unplugged for 30 minutes before resuming.
 
 ### Reducing the power envelope