(no commit message)
authorkerma2 <kerma2@web>
Sun, 20 Sep 2015 13:32:16 +0000 (13:32 +0000)
committerCharlie Root <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Sun, 20 Sep 2015 13:32:16 +0000 (13:32 +0000)
history/index.mdwn

index 97f7b98..e16c3f5 100644 (file)
@@ -8,15 +8,15 @@ In the 2007-2008 time-frame a new filesystem called [[HAMMER|hammer]] was develo
 
 From 2009 onward many developers have focused on SMP scalability while others have put an emphasis on new feature development and driver porting.  The VM system was finally fine-grain locked all the way down to the pmap in late 2011, resulting in huge performance gains on many-cores machines.  Major subsystems were scaled one after another.
 
-In 2012 Francois Tigeot and a dedicated group of helpers began retooling drm (the graphics subsystem) with an active port from linux, slowly bringing the system up to modern standards.  As of 2015 fully accelerated 2D, 3D, and video support is operational with Xorg.  At around the same time there was also a concerted effort to upgrade the sound system with a major HDAA port from FreeBSD.  Graphics, Video, and Sound have turned DragonFly into quite a nice desktop.
+In 2012 Francois Tigeot and a dedicated group of helpers began retooling drm (the graphics subsystem) with an active port from Linux, slowly bringing the system up to modern standards.  As of 2015 fully accelerated 2D, 3D, and video support is operational with Xorg.  At around the same time there was also a concerted effort to upgrade the sound system with a major HDAA port from FreeBSD.  Graphics, Video, and Sound have turned DragonFly into quite a nice desktop.
 
 In 2013 the PID, PGRP, and SESSION subsystems were SMP-scaled.  In 2014 one of the few remaining SMP critical scaleability paths, the fork/exec/exit/wait sequence, including related page-faulting and library mapping, was fully scaled, greatly boosting bulk build performance and concurrency.
 
-Also during this period the network stack underwent a continuous stream of small SMP improvements to the point where today all major protocols, including both ipfw and PF, are fully concurrent with few locking collisions.  DragonFlyBSD enjoys phenominal networking performance today.
+Also during this period the network stack underwent a continuous stream of small SMP improvements to the point where today all major protocols, including both ipfw and PF, are fully concurrent with few locking collisions.  DragonFlyBSD enjoys phenomenal networking performance today.
 
 Further and more up to date information on the project goals and status are available on this website, and discussion of the project is possible on a variety of newsgroups, mailing lists and IRC.
 
-DragonFly BSD was originally forked from FreeBSD 4.8 in June of 2003, by Matthew Dillon. The project was originally billed as "the logical continuation of the FreeBSD 4.x series", as quoted in [Matthew Dillon's announcement](http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-current/2003-July/006889.html), but this description has long since become obsolete.  From a performance perspective DragonFly's only real competitor these days is linux.
+DragonFly BSD was originally forked from FreeBSD 4.8 in June of 2003, by Matthew Dillon. The project was originally billed as "the logical continuation of the FreeBSD 4.x series", as quoted in [Matthew Dillon's announcement](http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-current/2003-July/006889.html), but this description has long since become obsolete.  From a performance perspective DragonFly's only real competitor these days is Linux.
 
 See all past DragonFly [[releases]].