Minor changes.
authoraviraldg <aviraldg@web>
Thu, 9 Dec 2010 18:19:20 +0000 (10:19 -0800)
committerCharlie <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Thu, 9 Dec 2010 18:19:20 +0000 (10:19 -0800)
docs/newhandbook/FTP/index.mdwn

index 1b783ca..3a24239 100644 (file)
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ Other challenge is whether to configure it in active mode or passive mode.
 
 ### Adding the FTP user account
 
-First you need a ftp account on your system. This account should not have a usable password. We will set the login directory to /home/ftp but it's totally your choice. when using anonymous ftp, the ftp daemon will chroot itself in the /home/ftp directory. We also need to add a shell to be provided to ftp user. The account can be added with the adduser(8) or pw(8).
+First you need a ftp account on your system. This account should not have a usable password. We will set the login directory to */home/ftp* but it's totally your choice. when using anonymous ftp, the ftp daemon will chroot itself in the */home/ftp* directory. We also need to add a shell to be provided to ftp user. The account can be added with the adduser(8) or pw(8).
 
     # echo /usr/bin/false >> /etc/shells
     
@@ -65,9 +65,17 @@ Note: For chrooted user ftp server you need to enter a password, change the comm
 
 Along with the user, this created the directory /home/ftp. We need to change the permissions to make it equip for the anonymous user (it is totally administrators choice). 
 
-    */home/ftp* - This is the main directory. It should be owned by root and have permissions of 555. 
-    */home/ftp/etc* - This is entirely optional and not recommended, as it only serves to give out information on users which exist on your box. If you want your anonymous ftp directory to appear to have real users attached to your files, you should copy */etc/pwd.db* and */etc/group* to this directory. This directory should be mode 511, and the two files should be mode 444. These are used to give owner names as opposed to numbers. There are no passwords stored in pwd.db, they are all in spwd.db, so don't copy that over.
-    */home/ftp/pub* - This is a standard directory to place files in which you wish to share. This directory should also be mode 555.
+*/home/ftp* - This is the main directory. It should be owned by root and have permissions of 555. 
+
+*/home/ftp/etc* - This is entirely optional and not recommended, as it only serves to give out information on users which exist on your box. If you want your anonymous ftp directory to appear to have real users attached to your files, you should copy */etc/pwd.db* and */etc/group* to this directory. This directory should be mode 511, and the two files should be mode 444. These are used to give owner names as opposed to numbers. There are no passwords stored in pwd.db, they are all in spwd.db, so don't copy that over.
+
+*/home/ftp/pub* - This is a standard directory to place files in which you wish to share. This directory should also be mode 555.
+
+*/home/ftp* - This is the main directory. It should be owned by root and have permissions of 555.
+
+*/home/ftp/etc* - This is entirely optional and not recommended, as it only serves to give out information on users which exist on your box. If you want your anonymous ftp directory to appear to have real users attached to your files, you should copy */etc/pwd.db* and */etc/group* to this directory. This directory should be mode 511, and the two files should be mode 444. These are used to give owner names as opposed to numbers. There are no passwords stored in pwd.db, they are all in spwd.db, so don't copy that over.
+
+*/home/ftp/pub* - This is a standard directory to place files in which you wish to share. This directory should also be mode 555.
 
     # cd /home/ftp 
     # mkdir pub