NUKE HANDBOOK (OLD)
authorCharlie Root <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Sun, 10 Mar 2013 15:14:31 +0000 (08:14 -0700)
committerCharlie Root <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Sun, 10 Mar 2013 15:14:31 +0000 (08:14 -0700)
134 files changed:
docs/handbook/Tables.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/gw6c/index.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-LEGALNOTICE.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-advanced-networking.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-appendices.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-backup-basics.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-backups-floppybackups.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-backups-tapebackups.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-adminguides.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-hardware.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-history.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-journals.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-osinternals.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-programmers.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-security.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-userguides.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-colophon.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-creating-cds.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-creating-dvds.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-cvs-tags.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-cvsup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-browsers.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-finance.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-productivity.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-summary.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-viewers.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-desktop.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-dialout.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-dialup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-disks-adding.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-disks-naming.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-disks-virtual.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-disks.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-news.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-web.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-eresources.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-floppies.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-disk.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-postinstall.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-preinstall.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-to-disk.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-install.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-installation-system-setup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-jails-application.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-basics.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-compiling.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-l10n.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-lang-setup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-advanced.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-lbc-install.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-maple.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-mathematica.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-matlab.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-oracle.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-advanced.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-agents.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-changingmta.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-fetchmail.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-procmail.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-trouble.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail-using.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mail.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors-ftp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-multimedia.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-bluetooth.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-bridging.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-dhcp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-diskless.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-dns.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-inetd.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-ipv6.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-isdn.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-natd.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-nfs.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-nis.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-ntp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-plip.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-routing.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-network-wireless.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-outgoing-only.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pgpkeys.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-broken.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-finding-applications.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-nextsteps.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-overview.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-sourcetree-using.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc-using.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pkgsrc.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-ppp-and-slip.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-ppp-troubleshoot.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-ppp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-pppoe.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-advanced.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-intro-setup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-intro-spooler.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-lpd-alternatives.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-troubleshooting.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing-using.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-printing.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-quotas.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-raid.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-sapr3.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-sendmail.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-serial.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-serialcomms.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-serialconsole-setup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-slip.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-smtp-auth.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-smtp-dialup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-smtp-uucp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-sound-mp3.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-sound-setup.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-term.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-tvcard.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-updating-before-building.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-updating-makeworld.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-updating-using.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-updating.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-userppp.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-using-localization.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-video-playback.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-access-bottlenecks.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-config.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-data-integrity.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-examples.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-intro.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-object-naming.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-objects.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-root.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/handbook-vinum-vinum.mdwn [deleted file]
docs/handbook/index.mdwn [deleted file]

diff --git a/docs/handbook/Tables.mdwn b/docs/handbook/Tables.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index da97b3f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,93 +0,0 @@
-  **List of Tables** \r
-\r
-           3-1. [Disk Device Codes](disk-organization.html)\r
-\r
-           12-1. [Physical Disk Naming Conventions](disks-naming.html)\r
-\r
-           13-1. [Vinum Plex Organizations](vinum-objects.html)\r
-\r
-           19-1. [Wiring a Parallel Cable for Networking](network-plip.html)\r
-\r
-           19-2. [Reserved IPv6 addresses](network-ipv6.html)\r
-\r
-\r
-  **List of Figures** \r
-\r
-           13-1. [Concatenated Organization](vinum-access-bottlenecks.html)\r
-\r
-           13-2. [Striped Organization](vinum-access-bottlenecks.html)\r
-\r
-           13-3. [RAID-5 Organization](vinum-data-integrity.html)\r
-\r
-           13-4. [A Simple Vinum Volume](vinum-examples.html)\r
-\r
-           13-5. [A Mirrored Vinum Volume](vinum-examples.html)\r
-\r
-           13-6. [A Striped Vinum Volume](vinum-examples.html)\r
-\r
-           13-7. [A Mirrored, Striped Vinum Volume](vinum-examples.html)\r
-\r
-\r
-  **List of Examples** \r
-\r
-           3-1. [Sample Disk, Slice, and Partition Names](disk-organization.html)\r
-\r
-           3-2. [Conceptual Model of a Disk](disk-organization.html)\r
-\r
-           4-1. [Downloading a Package Manually and Installing It Locally](pkgsrc-using.html)\r
-\r
-           6-1. [Creating a Swapfile](adding-swap-space.html)\r
-\r
-           7-1. [boot0 Screenshot](boot-blocks.html)\r
-\r
-           7-2. [boot2 Screenshot](boot-blocks.html)\r
-\r
-           7-3. [An Insecure Console in /etc/ttys](boot-init.html)\r
-\r
-           8-1. [Configuring adduser and adding a        user](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-2. [rmuser Interactive Account Removal](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-3. [Interactive chpass by Superuser](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-4. [Interactive chpass by Normal User](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-5. [Changing Your Password](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-6. [Changing Another User's Password as the Superuser](users-modifying.html)\r
-\r
-           8-7. [Adding a Group Using pw(8)](users-groups.html)\r
-\r
-           8-8. [Adding Somebody to a Group Using pw(8)](users-groups.html)\r
-\r
-           8-9. [Using id(1) to Determine Group Membership](users-groups.html)\r
-\r
-           10-1. [Using SSH to Create a Secure Tunnel for SMTP](openssh.html)\r
-\r
-           12-1. [Using dump over  **ssh** ](backup-basics.html)\r
-\r
-           12-2. [Using dump over  **ssh**  with RSH set](backup-basics.html)\r
-\r
-           12-3. [A Script for Creating a Bootable Floppy](backup-basics.html)\r
-\r
-           12-4. [Using vnconfig to Mount an Existing File System Image](disks-virtual.html)\r
-\r
-           12-5. [Creating a New File-Backed Disk with vnconfig](disks-virtual.html)\r
-\r
-           12-6. [md Memory Disk](disks-virtual.html)\r
-\r
-           17-1. [Adding Terminal Entries to    /etc/ttys](term.html)\r
-\r
-           19-1. [Mounting an Export with  **amd** ](network-nfs.html)\r
-\r
-           19-2. [Branch Office or Home Network](network-isdn.html)\r
-\r
-           19-3. [Head Office or Other LAN](network-isdn.html)\r
-\r
-           19-4. [Sending  **inetd**  a HangUP Signal](network-inetd.html)\r
-\r
-           20-1. [Configuring the  **sendmail**          Access Database](sendmail.html)\r
-\r
-           20-2. [Mail Aliases](sendmail.html)\r
-\r
-           20-3. [Example Virtual Domain Mail Map](sendmail.html)\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/gw6c/index.mdwn b/docs/handbook/gw6c/index.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ee80993..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-gw6c is the gogo6 IPv6 client. 
-
-* Install gmake from pkgsrc
-
-* [Download](http://gogonet.gogo6.com/page/download-1) the 6.0 Basic version source from 
-
-tar xvf gw6c-6_0-RELEASE-src.tar 
-
-cd gw6c-6_0_1
-
-edit ./gw6c-pal/Makefile and ./tspc-advanced/Makefile
-
-Replace the line
-    PLATFORM      :=$(shell [ -z "$(platform)" ] && uname | tr "[A-Z]" "[a-z]" || echo "$(platform)" )
-
-With
-    PLATFORM=netbsd
-
-gmake
-
-gmake installdir=/usr/local/gw6c install
-
-See [[handbook-network-ipv6]] for configuration options.
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-LEGALNOTICE.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-LEGALNOTICE.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index cd76e0f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,98 +0,0 @@
-# DragonFly BSD Handbook \r
-\r
-Redistribution and use in source (Wiki source) and 'compiled' forms (HTML, PDF, PostScript, RTF and so forth) with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:\r
-\r
-Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer as the first lines of this file unmodified.\r
-\r
-Redistributions in compiled form (transformed to other DTDs, converted to PDF, PostScript, RTF and other formats) must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.\r
-~-\r
-\r
-Important: THIS DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED BY THE DRAGONFLY BSD DOCUMENTATION PROJECT "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE FREEBSD DOCUMENTATION PROJECT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS DOCUMENTATION, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.\r
-\r
-DragonFlyBSD is a registered trademark of the DragonFlyBSD Project.\r
-\r
-FreeBSD is a registered trademark of the FreeBSD Foundation.\r
-\r
-NetBSD is a registered trademark of The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.\r
-\r
-pkgsrc is a registered trademark of The NetBSD Foundation, Inc.\r
-\r
-3Com and HomeConnect are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation.\r
-\r
-3ware and Escalade are registered trademarks of 3ware Inc.\r
-\r
-ARM is a registered trademark of ARM Limited.\r
-\r
-Adaptec is a registered trademark of Adaptec, Inc.\r
-\r
-Adobe, Acrobat, Acrobat Reader, and PostScript are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-Apple, AirPort, FireWire, Mac, Macintosh, Mac OS, Quicktime, and TrueType are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-Corel and WordPerfect are trademarks or registered trademarks of Corel Corporation and/or its subsidiaries in Canada, the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-Sound Blaster is a trademark of Creative Technology Ltd. in the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-CVSup is a registered trademark of John D. Polstra.\r
-\r
-Heidelberg, Helvetica, Palatino, and Times Roman are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG in the U.S. and other countries.\r
-\r
-IBM, AIX, EtherJet, Netfinity, OS/2, PowerPC, PS/2, S/390, and ThinkPad are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.\r
-\r
-IEEE, POSIX, and 802 are registered trademarks of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. in the United States.\r
-\r
-Intel, Celeron, EtherExpress, i386, i486, Itanium, Pentium, and Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-Intuit and Quicken are registered trademarks and/or registered service marks of Intuit Inc., or one of its subsidiaries, in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.\r
-\r
-LSI Logic, AcceleRAID, eXtremeRAID, MegaRAID and Mylex are trademarks or registered trademarks of LSI Logic Corp.\r
-\r
-M-Systems and DiskOnChip are trademarks or registered trademarks of M-Systems Flash Disk Pioneers, Ltd.\r
-\r
-Macromedia, Flash, and Shockwave are trademarks or registered trademarks of Macromedia, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-Microsoft, IntelliMouse, MS-DOS, Outlook, Windows, Windows Media and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-Netscape and the Netscape Navigator are registered trademarks of Netscape Communications Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.\r
-\r
-GateD and NextHop are registered and unregistered trademarks of NextHop in the U.S. and other countries.\r
-\r
-Motif, OSF/1, and UNIX are registered trademarks and IT DialTone and The Open Group are trademarks of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation.\r
-\r
-PowerQuest and PartitionMagic are registered trademarks of PowerQuest Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.\r
-\r
-RealNetworks, RealPlayer, and RealAudio are the registered trademarks of RealNetworks, Inc.\r
-\r
-Red Hat, RPM, are trademarks or registered trademarks of Red Hat, Inc. in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-SAP, R/3, and mySAP are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and in several other countries all over the world.\r
-\r
-Sun, Sun Microsystems, Java, Java Virtual Machine, JavaServer Pages, JDK, JRE, JSP, JVM, Netra, Solaris, StarOffice, Sun Blade, Sun Enterprise, Sun Fire, SunOS, and Ultra are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-Symantec and Ghost are registered trademarks of Symantec Corporation in the United States and other countries.\r
-\r
-MATLAB is a registered trademark of The MathWorks, Inc.\r
-\r
-SpeedTouch is a trademark of Thomson.\r
-\r
-U.S. Robotics and Sportster are registered trademarks of U.S. Robotics Corporation.\r
-\r
-VMware is a trademark of VMware, Inc.\r
-\r
-Waterloo Maple and Maple are trademarks or registered trademarks of Waterloo Maple Inc.\r
-\r
-Mathematica is a registered trademark of Wolfram Research, Inc.\r
-\r
-XFree86 is a trademark of The XFree86 Project, Inc.\r
-\r
-Ogg Vorbis and Xiph.Org are trademarks of Xiph.Org.\r
--~\r
-\r
-Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this document, and the DragonFly Project was aware of the trademark claim, the designations have been followed by the “™” or the “®” symbol.\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-advanced-networking.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-advanced-networking.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d651538..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,82 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 19 Advanced Networking \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 19.1 [Synopsis](advanced-networking.html)\r
-
-* 19.2 [Gateways and Routes](network-routing.html)\r
-
-* 19.3 [Wireless Networking](network-wireless.html)\r
-
-* 19.4 [Bluetooth](network-bluetooth.html)\r
-
-* 19.5 [Bridging](network-bridging.html)\r
-
-* 19.6 [NFS](network-nfs.html)\r
-
-* 19.7 [Diskless Operation](network-diskless.html)\r
-
-* 19.8 [ISDN](network-isdn.html)\r
-
-* 19.9 [NIS/YP](network-nis.html)\r
-
-* 19.10 [DHCP](network-dhcp.html)\r
-
-* 19.11 [DNS](network-dns.html)\r
-
-* 19.12 [NTP](network-ntp.html)\r
-
-* 19.13 [Network Address Translation](network-natd.html)\r
-
-* 19.14 [The ***inetd *** Super-Server](network-inetd.html)\r
-
-* 19.15 [Parallel Line IP (PLIP)](network-plip.html)\r
-
-* 19.16 [IPv6](network-ipv6.html)\r
-\r
-## 19.1 Synopsis \r
-\r
-This chapter will cover some of the more frequently used network services on UNIX® systems. We will cover how to define, set up, test and maintain all of the network services that DragonFly utilizes. In addition, there have been example configuration files included throughout this chapter for you to benefit from.\r
-\r
-After reading this chapter, you will know:\r
-\r
-
-* The basics of gateways and routes.\r
-
-* How to set up IEEE 802.11 and Bluetooth® devices.\r
-
-* How to make DragonFly act as a bridge.\r
-
-* How to set up a network filesystem.\r
-
-* How to set up network booting on a diskless machine.\r
-
-* How to set up a network information server for sharing user accounts.\r
-
-* How to set up automatic network settings using DHCP.\r
-
-* How to set up a domain name server.\r
-
-* How to synchronize the time and date, and set up a time server, with the NTP protocol.\r
-
-* How to set up network address translation.\r
-
-* How to manage the ***inetd*** daemon.\r
-
-* How to connect two computers via PLIP.\r
-
-* How to set up IPv6 on a DragonFly machine.\r
-\r
-Before reading this chapter, you should:\r
-\r
-
-* Understand the basics of the `/etc/rc` scripts.\r
-
-* Be familiar with basic network terminology.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-appendices.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-appendices.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 8661554..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,8 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## III. Appendices \r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-backup-basics.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-backup-basics.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6ba07a0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,289 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.10 Backup Basics \r
-\r
-The three major backup programs are [dump(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#dump&section8), [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=tar&section=1), and [cpio(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=cpio&section=1).\r
-\r
-### 12.10.1 Dump and Restore \r
-\r
-The traditional UNIX® backup programs are `dump` and `restore`. They operate on the drive as a collection of disk blocks, below the abstractions of files, links and directories that are created by the file systems. `dump` backs up an entire file system on a device. It is unable to backup only part of a file system or a directory tree that spans more than one file system. `dump` does not write files and directories to tape, but rather writes the raw data blocks that comprise files and directories.\r
-\r
- **Note:** If you use `dump` on your root directory, you would not back up `/home`, `/usr` or many other directories since these are typically mount points for other file systems or symbolic links into those file systems.\r
-\r
-`dump` has quirks that remain from its early days in Version 6 of AT&amp;T UNIX (circa 1975). The default parameters are suitable for 9-track tapes (6250 bpi), not the high-density media available today (up to 62,182 ftpi). These defaults must be overridden on the command line to utilize the capacity of current tape drives.\r
-\r
-It is also possible to backup data across the network to a tape drive attached to another computer with `rdump` and `rrestore`. Both programs rely upon `rcmd` and `ruserok` to access the remote tape drive. Therefore, the user performing the backup must be listed in the `.rhosts` file on the remote computer. The arguments to `rdump` and `rrestore` must be suitable to use on the remote computer. When `rdump`ing from a DragonFly computer to an Exabyte tape drive connected to a Sun called `komodo`, use:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /sbin/rdump 0dsbfu 54000 13000 126 komodo:/dev/nsa8 /dev/da0a 2&gt;&amp;1\r
-\r
-\r
-Beware: there are security implications to allowing `.rhosts` authentication. Evaluate your situation carefully.\r
-\r
-It is also possible to use `dump` and `restore` in a more secure fashion over `ssh`.\r
-\r
- **Example 12-1. Using `dump` over** ssh **** \r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /sbin/dump -0uan -f - /usr | gzip -2 | ssh1 -c blowfish \\r
-              targetuser@targetmachine.example.com dd of=/mybigfiles/dump-usr-l0.gz\r
-\r
-\r
-Or using `dump`'s built-in method, setting the enviroment variable `RSH`:\r
-\r
- **Example 12-2. Using `dump` over** ssh ** with `RSH` set** \r
-\r
-    \r
-    # RSH=/usr/bin/ssh /sbin/dump -0uan -f targetuser@targetmachine.example.com:/dev/sa0\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.10.2 `tar` \r
-\r
-[tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) also dates back to Version 6 of AT&amp;T UNIX (circa 1975). `tar` operates in cooperation with the file system; `tar` writes files and directories to tape. `tar` does not support the full range of options that are available from [cpio(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=cpio&section=1), but `tar` does not require the unusual command pipeline that `cpio` uses.\r
-\r
-Most versions of `tar` do not support backups across the network. The GNU version of `tar`, which DragonFly utilizes, supports remote devices using the same syntax as `rdump`. To `tar` to an Exabyte tape drive connected to a Sun called `komodo`, use:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /usr/bin/tar cf komodo:/dev/nsa8 . 2&gt;&amp;1\r
-\r
-\r
-For versions without remote device support, you can use a pipeline and `rsh` to send the data to a remote tape drive.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tar cf - . | rsh `***hostname***` dd of#`***tape-device***` obs20b\r
-\r
-\r
-If you are worried about the security of backing up over a network you should use the `ssh` command instead of `rsh`.\r
-\r
-### 12.10.3 `cpio` \r
-\r
-[cpio(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cpio&section1) is the original UNIX file interchange tape program for magnetic media. `cpio` has options (among many others) to perform byte-swapping, write a number of different archive formats, and pipe the data to other programs. This last feature makes `cpio` an excellent choice for installation media. `cpio` does not know how to walk the directory tree and a list of files must be provided through `stdin`.\r
-\r
-`cpio` does not support backups across the network. You can use a pipeline and `rsh` to send the data to a remote tape drive.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # for f in `***directory_list; do***`\r
-    find $f &gt;&gt; backup.list\r
-    done\r
-    # cpio -v -o --format=newc &lt; backup.list | ssh `***user***`@`***host***` "cat &gt; `***backup_device***`"\r
-\r
-\r
-Where `***directory_list***` is the list of directories you want to back up, `***user***`@`***host***` is the user/hostname combination that will be performing the backups, and `***backup_device***` is where the backups should be written to (e.g., `/dev/nsa0`).\r
-\r
-### 12.10.4 `pax` \r
-\r
-[pax(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#pax&section1) is IEEE/POSIX®'s answer to `tar` and `cpio`. Over the years the various versions of `tar` and `cpio` have gotten slightly incompatible. So rather than fight it out to fully standardize them, POSIX created a new archive utility. `pax` attempts to read and write many of the various `cpio` and `tar` formats, plus new formats of its own. Its command set more resembles `cpio` than `tar`.\r
-\r
-### 12.10.5  **Amanda**  \r
-\r
- **Amanda**  (Advanced Maryland Network Disk Archiver) is a client/server backup system, rather than a single program. An  **Amanda**  server will backup to a single tape drive any number of computers that have  **Amanda**  clients and a network connection to the  **Amanda**  server. A common problem at sites with a number of large disks is that the length of time required to backup to data directly to tape exceeds the amount of time available for the task.  **Amanda**  solves this problem.  **Amanda**  can use a ***holding disk*** to backup several file systems at the same time.  **Amanda**  creates ***archive sets***: a group of tapes used over a period of time to create full backups of all the file systems listed in  **Amanda** 's configuration file. The ***archive set*** also contains nightly incremental (or differential) backups of all the file systems. Restoring a damaged file system requires the most recent full backup and the incremental backups.\r
-\r
-The configuration file provides fine control of backups and the network traffic that  **Amanda**  generates.  **Amanda**  will use any of the above backup programs to write the data to tape.  **Amanda**  is available as either a port or a package, it is not installed by default.\r
-\r
-### 12.10.6 Do Nothing \r
-\r
-***Do nothing*** is not a computer program, but it is the most widely used backup strategy. There are no initial costs. There is no backup schedule to follow. Just say no. If something happens to your data, grin and bear it!\r
-\r
-If your time and your data is worth little to nothing, then ***Do nothing*** is the most suitable backup program for your computer. But beware, UNIX is a useful tool, you may find that within six months you have a collection of files that are valuable to you.\r
-\r
-***Do nothing*** is the correct backup method for `/usr/obj` and other directory trees that can be exactly recreated by your computer. An example is the files that comprise the HTML or PostScript® version of this Handbook. These document formats have been created from SGML input files. Creating backups of the HTML or PostScript files is not necessary. The SGML files are backed up regularly.\r
-\r
-### 12.10.7 Which Backup Program Is Best? \r
-\r
-[dump(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#dump&section8) ***Period.*** Elizabeth D. Zwicky torture tested all the backup programs discussed here. The clear choice for preserving all your data and all the peculiarities of UNIX file systems is `dump`. Elizabeth created file systems containing a large variety of unusual conditions (and some not so unusual ones) and tested each program by doing a backup and restore of those file systems. The peculiarities included: files with holes, files with holes and a block of nulls, files with funny characters in their names, unreadable and unwritable files, devices, files that change size during the backup, files that are created/deleted during the backup and more. She presented the results at LISA V in Oct. 1991. Read the [***Torture-testing Backup and Archive Programs***](http://berdmann.dyndns.org/zwicky/testdump.doc.html) study for more information.\r
-\r
-### 12.10.8 Emergency Restore Procedure \r
-\r
-#### 12.10.8.1 Before the Disaster \r
-\r
-There are only four steps that you need to perform in preparation for any disaster that may occur.\r
-\r
-First, print the disklabel from each of your disks (e.g. `disklabel da0 | lpr`), your file system table (`/etc/fstab`) and all boot messages, two copies of each.\r
-\r
-Second, determine that the boot and fix-it floppies (`boot.flp` and `fixit.flp`) have all your devices. The easiest way to check is to reboot your machine with the boot floppy in the floppy drive and check the boot messages. If all your devices are listed and functional, skip on to step three.\r
-\r
-Otherwise, you have to create two custom bootable floppies which have a kernel that can mount all of your disks and access your tape drive. These floppies must contain: `fdisk`, `disklabel`, `newfs`, `mount`, and whichever backup program you use. These programs must be statically linked. If you use `dump`, the floppy must contain `restore`.\r
-\r
-Third, create backup tapes regularly. Any changes that you make after your last backup may be irretrievably lost. Write-protect the backup tapes.\r
-\r
-Fourth, test the floppies (either `boot.flp` and `fixit.flp` or the two custom bootable floppies you made in step two.) and backup tapes. Make notes of the procedure. Store these notes with the bootable floppy, the printouts and the backup tapes. You will be so distraught when restoring that the notes may prevent you from destroying your backup tapes (How? In place of `tar xvf /dev/sa0`, you might accidentally type `tar cvf /dev/sa0` and over-write your backup tape).\r
-\r
-For an added measure of security, make bootable floppies and two backup tapes each time. Store one of each at a remote location. A remote location is NOT the basement of the same office building. A number of firms in the World Trade Center learned this lesson the hard way. A remote location should be physically separated from your computers and disk drives by a significant distance.\r
-\r
-***'Example 12-3. A Script for Creating a Bootable Floppy***'\r
-\r
-    \r
-    #!/bin/sh\r
-    #\r
-    # create a restore floppy\r
-    #\r
-    # format the floppy\r
-    #\r
-    PATH=/bin:/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin\r
-    \r
-    fdformat -q fd0\r
-    if [ $? -ne 0 ]\r
-    then\r
-        echo "Bad floppy, please use a new one"\r
-        exit 1\r
-    fi\r
-    \r
-    # place boot blocks on the floppy\r
-    #\r
-    disklabel -w -B /dev/fd0c fd1440\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # newfs the one and only partition\r
-    #\r
-    newfs -t 2 -u 18 -l 1 -c 40 -i 5120 -m 5 -o space /dev/fd0a\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # mount the new floppy\r
-    #\r
-    mount /dev/fd0a /mnt\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # create required directories\r
-    #\r
-    mkdir /mnt/dev\r
-    mkdir /mnt/bin\r
-    mkdir /mnt/sbin\r
-    mkdir /mnt/etc\r
-    mkdir /mnt/root\r
-    mkdir /mnt/mnt                     # for the root partition\r
-    mkdir /mnt/tmp\r
-    mkdir /mnt/var\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # populate the directories\r
-    #\r
-    if [ ! -x /sys/compile/MINI/kernel ]\r
-    then\r
-        cat &lt;&lt; EOM\r
-    The MINI kernel does not exist, please create one.\r
-    Here is an example config file:\r
-    #\r
-    # MINI -- A kernel to get &amp;os; onto a disk.\r
-    #\r
-    machine         "i386"\r
-    cpu             "I486_CPU"\r
-    ident           MINI\r
-    maxusers        5\r
-    \r
-    options         INET                    # needed for _tcp _icmpstat _ipstat\r
-                                            #            _udpstat _tcpstat _udb\r
-    options         FFS                     #Berkeley Fast File System\r
-    options         FAT_CURSOR              #block cursor in syscons or pccons\r
-    options         SCSI_DELAY=15           #Be pessimistic about Joe SCSI device\r
-    options         NCONS=2                 #1 virtual consoles\r
-    options         USERCONFIG              #Allow user configuration with -c XXX\r
-    \r
-    config          kernel     root on da0 swap on da0 and da1 dumps on da0\r
-    \r
-    device          isa0\r
-    device          pci0\r
-    \r
-    device          fdc0       at isa? port "IO_FD1" bio irq 6 drq 2 vector fdintr\r
-    device          fd0        at fdc0 drive 0\r
-    \r
-    device          ncr0\r
-    \r
-    device          scbus0\r
-    \r
-    device          sc0        at isa? port "IO_KBD" tty irq 1 vector scintr\r
-    device          npx0       at isa? port "IO_NPX" irq 13 vector npxintr\r
-    \r
-    device          da0\r
-    device          da1\r
-    device          da2\r
-    \r
-    device          sa0\r
-    \r
-    pseudo-device   loop            # required by INET\r
-    pseudo-device   gzip            # Exec gzipped a.out's\r
-    EOM\r
-        exit 1\r
-    fi\r
-    \r
-    cp -f /sys/compile/MINI/kernel /mnt\r
-    \r
-    gzip -c -best /sbin/init &gt; /mnt/sbin/init\r
-    gzip -c -best /sbin/fsck &gt; /mnt/sbin/fsck\r
-    gzip -c -best /sbin/mount &gt; /mnt/sbin/mount\r
-    gzip -c -best /sbin/halt &gt; /mnt/sbin/halt\r
-    gzip -c -best /sbin/restore &gt; /mnt/sbin/restore\r
-    \r
-    gzip -c -best /bin/sh &gt; /mnt/bin/sh\r
-    gzip -c -best /bin/sync &gt; /mnt/bin/sync\r
-    \r
-    cp /root/.profile /mnt/root\r
-    \r
-    cp -f /dev/MAKEDEV /mnt/dev\r
-    chmod 755 /mnt/dev/MAKEDEV\r
-    \r
-    chmod 500 /mnt/sbin/init\r
-    chmod 555 /mnt/sbin/fsck /mnt/sbin/mount /mnt/sbin/halt\r
-    chmod 555 /mnt/bin/sh /mnt/bin/sync\r
-    chmod 6555 /mnt/sbin/restore\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # create the devices nodes\r
-    #\r
-    cd /mnt/dev\r
-    ./MAKEDEV std\r
-    ./MAKEDEV da0\r
-    ./MAKEDEV da1\r
-    ./MAKEDEV da2\r
-    ./MAKEDEV sa0\r
-    ./MAKEDEV pty0\r
-    cd /\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # create minimum file system table\r
-    #\r
-    cat &gt; /mnt/etc/fstab &lt;&lt;EOM\r
-    /dev/fd0a    /    ufs    rw  1  1\r
-    EOM\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # create minimum passwd file\r
-    #\r
-    cat &gt; /mnt/etc/passwd &lt;&lt;EOM\r
-    root:*:0:0:Charlie &amp;:/root:/bin/sh\r
-    EOM\r
-    \r
-    cat &gt; /mnt/etc/master.passwd &lt;&lt;EOM\r
-    root::0:0::0:0:Charlie &amp;:/root:/bin/sh\r
-    EOM\r
-    \r
-    chmod 600 /mnt/etc/master.passwd\r
-    chmod 644 /mnt/etc/passwd\r
-    /usr/sbin/pwd_mkdb -d/mnt/etc /mnt/etc/master.passwd\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # umount the floppy and inform the user\r
-    #\r
-    /sbin/umount /mnt\r
-    echo "The floppy has been unmounted and is now ready."\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 12.10.8.2 After the Disaster \r
-\r
-The key question is: did your hardware survive? You have been doing regular backups so there is no need to worry about the software.\r
-\r
-If the hardware has been damaged, the parts should be replaced before attempting to use the computer.\r
-\r
-If your hardware is okay, check your floppies. If you are using a custom boot floppy, boot single-user (type `-s` at the boot: prompt). Skip the following paragraph.\r
-\r
-If you are using the `boot.flp` and `fixit.flp` floppies, keep reading. Insert the `boot.flp` floppy in the first floppy drive and boot the computer. The original install menu will be displayed on the screen. Select the `Fixit--Repair mode with CDROM or floppy.` option. Insert the `fixit.flp` when prompted. `restore` and the other programs that you need are located in `/mnt2/stand`.\r
-\r
-Recover each file system separately.\r
-\r
-Try to `mount` (e.g. `mount /dev/da0a /mnt`) the root partition of your first disk. If the disklabel was damaged, use `disklabel` to re-partition and label the disk to match the label that you printed and saved. Use `newfs` to re-create the file systems. Re-mount the root partition of the floppy read-write (`mount -u -o rw /mnt`). Use your backup program and backup tapes to recover the data for this file system (e.g. `restore vrf /dev/sa0`). Unmount the file system (e.g. `umount /mnt`). Repeat for each file system that was damaged.\r
-\r
-Once your system is running, backup your data onto new tapes. Whatever caused the crash or data loss may strike again. Another hour spent now may save you from further distress later.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-floppybackups.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-floppybackups.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b0b41c0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,63 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.9 Backups to Floppies \r
-\r
-### 12.9.1 Can I Use Floppies for Backing Up My Data? \r
-\r
-Floppy disks are not really a suitable media for making backups as:\r
-\r
-
-* The media is unreliable, especially over long periods of time.\r
-
-* Backing up and restoring is very slow.\r
-
-* They have a very limited capacity (the days of backing up an entire hard disk onto a dozen or so floppies has long since passed).\r
-\r
-However, if you have no other method of backing up your data then floppy disks are better than no backup at all.\r
-\r
-If you do have to use floppy disks then ensure that you use good quality ones. Floppies that have been lying around the office for a couple of years are a bad choice. Ideally use new ones from a reputable manufacturer.\r
-\r
-### 12.9.2 So How Do I Backup My Data to Floppies? \r
-\r
-The best way to backup to floppy disk is to use [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) with the `-M` (multi volume) option, which allows backups to span multiple floppies.\r
-\r
-To backup all the files in the current directory and sub-directory use this (as `root`):\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tar Mcvf /dev/fd0 *\r
-\r
-\r
-When the first floppy is full [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) will prompt you to insert the next volume (because [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=tar&section=1) is media independent it refers to volumes; in this context it means floppy disk).\r
-\r
-    \r
-    Prepare volume #2 for /dev/fd0 and hit return:\r
-\r
-\r
-This is repeated (with the volume number incrementing) until all the specified files have been archived.\r
-\r
-### 12.9.3 Can I Compress My Backups? \r
-\r
-Unfortunately, [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) will not allow the `-z` option to be used for multi-volume archives. You could, of course, [gzip(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=gzip&section=1) all the files, [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=tar&section=1) them to the floppies, then [gunzip(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=gunzip&section=1) the files again!\r
-\r
-### 12.9.4 How Do I Restore My Backups? \r
-\r
-To restore the entire archive use:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tar Mxvf /dev/fd0\r
-\r
-\r
-There are two ways that you can use to restore only specific files. First, you can start with the first floppy and use:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tar Mxvf /dev/fd0 `***filename***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The utility [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) will prompt you to insert subsequent floppies until it finds the required file.\r
-\r
-Alternatively, if you know which floppy the file is on then you can simply insert that floppy and use the same command as above. Note that if the first file on the floppy is a continuation from the previous one then [tar(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#tar&section1) will warn you that it cannot restore it, even if you have not asked it to!\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-tapebackups.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-tapebackups.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 88443e6..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,80 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.8 Creating and Using Data Tapes \r
-\r
-The major tape media are the 4mm, 8mm, QIC, mini-cartridge and DLT.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.1 4mm (DDS: Digital Data Storage) \r
-\r
-4mm tapes are replacing QIC as the workstation backup media of choice. This trend accelerated greatly when Conner purchased Archive, a leading manufacturer of QIC drives, and then stopped production of QIC drives. 4mm drives are small and quiet but do not have the reputation for reliability that is enjoyed by 8mm drives. The cartridges are less expensive and smaller (3 x 2 x 0.5 inches, 76 x 51 x 12 mm) than 8mm cartridges. 4mm, like 8mm, has comparatively short head life for the same reason, both use helical scan.\r
-\r
-Data throughput on these drives starts ~150 kB/s, peaking at ~500 kB/s. Data capacity starts at 1.3 GB and ends at 2.0 GB. Hardware compression, available with most of these drives, approximately doubles the capacity. Multi-drive tape library units can have 6 drives in a single cabinet with automatic tape changing. Library capacities reach 240 GB.\r
-\r
-The DDS-3 standard now supports tape capacities up to 12 GB (or 24 GB compressed).\r
-\r
-4mm drives, like 8mm drives, use helical-scan. All the benefits and drawbacks of helical-scan apply to both 4mm and 8mm drives.\r
-\r
-Tapes should be retired from use after 2,000 passes or 100 full backups.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.2 8mm (Exabyte) \r
-\r
-8mm tapes are the most common SCSI tape drives; they are the best choice of exchanging tapes. Nearly every site has an Exabyte 2 GB 8mm tape drive. 8mm drives are reliable, convenient and quiet. Cartridges are inexpensive and small (4.8 x 3.3 x 0.6 inches; 122 x 84 x 15 mm). One downside of 8mm tape is relatively short head and tape life due to the high rate of relative motion of the tape across the heads.\r
-\r
-Data throughput ranges from ~250 kB/s to ~500 kB/s. Data sizes start at 300 MB and go up to 7 GB. Hardware compression, available with most of these drives, approximately doubles the capacity. These drives are available as single units or multi-drive tape libraries with 6 drives and 120 tapes in a single cabinet. Tapes are changed automatically by the unit. Library capacities reach 840+ GB.\r
-\r
-The Exabyte ***Mammoth*** model supports 12 GB on one tape (24 GB with compression) and costs approximately twice as much as conventional tape drives.\r
-\r
-Data is recorded onto the tape using helical-scan, the heads are positioned at an angle to the media (approximately 6 degrees). The tape wraps around 270 degrees of the spool that holds the heads. The spool spins while the tape slides over the spool. The result is a high density of data and closely packed tracks that angle across the tape from one edge to the other.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.3 QIC \r
-\r
-QIC-150 tapes and drives are, perhaps, the most common tape drive and media around. QIC tape drives are the least expensive ***serious*** backup drives. The downside is the cost of media. QIC tapes are expensive compared to 8mm or 4mm tapes, up to 5 times the price per GB data storage. But, if your needs can be satisfied with a half-dozen tapes, QIC may be the correct choice. QIC is the ***most*** common tape drive. Every site has a QIC drive of some density or another. Therein lies the rub, QIC has a large number of densities on physically similar (sometimes identical) tapes. QIC drives are not quiet. These drives audibly seek before they begin to record data and are clearly audible whenever reading, writing or seeking. QIC tapes measure (6 x 4 x 0.7 inches; 15.2 x 10.2 x 1.7 mm). [backups-tapebackups.html#BACKUPS-TAPEBACKUPS-MINI Mini-cartridges], which also use 1/4" wide tape are discussed separately. Tape libraries and changers are not available.\r
-\r
-Data throughput ranges from ~150 kB/s to ~500 kB/s. Data capacity ranges from 40 MB to 15 GB. Hardware compression is available on many of the newer QIC drives. QIC drives are less frequently installed; they are being supplanted by DAT drives.\r
-\r
-Data is recorded onto the tape in tracks. The tracks run along the long axis of the tape media from one end to the other. The number of tracks, and therefore the width of a track, varies with the tape's capacity. Most if not all newer drives provide backward-compatibility at least for reading (but often also for writing). QIC has a good reputation regarding the safety of the data (the mechanics are simpler and more robust than for helical scan drives).\r
-\r
-Tapes should be retired from use after 5,000 backups.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.4 XXX* Mini-Cartridge \r
-\r
-### 12.8.5 DLT \r
-\r
-DLT has the fastest data transfer rate of all the drive types listed here. The 1/2" (12.5mm) tape is contained in a single spool cartridge (4 x 4 x 1 inches; 100 x 100 x 25 mm). The cartridge has a swinging gate along one entire side of the cartridge. The drive mechanism opens this gate to extract the tape leader. The tape leader has an oval hole in it which the drive uses to ***hook*** the tape. The take-up spool is located inside the tape drive. All the other tape cartridges listed here (9 track tapes are the only exception) have both the supply and take-up spools located inside the tape cartridge itself.\r
-\r
-Data throughput is approximately 1.5 MB/s, three times the throughput of 4mm, 8mm, or QIC tape drives. Data capacities range from 10 GB to 20 GB for a single drive. Drives are available in both multi-tape changers and multi-tape, multi-drive tape libraries containing from 5 to 900 tapes over 1 to 20 drives, providing from 50 GB to 9 TB of storage.\r
-\r
-With compression, DLT Type IV format supports up to 70 GB capacity.\r
-\r
-Data is recorded onto the tape in tracks parallel to the direction of travel (just like QIC tapes). Two tracks are written at once. Read/write head lifetimes are relatively long; once the tape stops moving, there is no relative motion between the heads and the tape.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.6 AIT \r
-\r
-AIT is a new format from Sony, and can hold up to 50 GB (with compression) per tape. The tapes contain memory chips which retain an index of the tape's contents. This index can be rapidly read by the tape drive to determine the position of files on the tape, instead of the several minutes that would be required for other tapes. Software such as  **SAMS:Alexandria**  can operate forty or more AIT tape libraries, communicating directly with the tape's memory chip to display the contents on screen, determine what files were backed up to which tape, locate the correct tape, load it, and restore the data from the tape.\r
-\r
-Libraries like this cost in the region of $20,000, pricing them a little out of the hobbyist market.\r
-\r
-### 12.8.7 Using a New Tape for the First Time \r
-\r
-The first time that you try to read or write a new, completely blank tape, the operation will fail. The console messages should be similar to:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    sa0(ncr1:4:0): NOT READY asc:4,1\r
-    sa0(ncr1:4:0):  Logical unit is in process of becoming ready\r
-\r
-\r
-The tape does not contain an Identifier Block (block number 0). All QIC tape drives since the adoption of QIC-525 standard write an Identifier Block to the tape. There are two solutions:\r
-\r
-
-* `mt fsf 1` causes the tape drive to write an Identifier Block to the tape.\r
-
-* Use the front panel button to eject the tape.\r
-  Re-insert the tape and `dump` data to the tape.\r
-  `dump` will report ***`DUMP: End of tape detected`*** and the console will show: ***`HARDWARE FAILURE info:280 asc:80,96`***.\r
-  rewind the tape using: `mt rewind`.\r
-  Subsequent tape operations are successful.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-adminguides.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-adminguides.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a633a51..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,27 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.3 Administrators' Guides \r
-\r
-
-* Albitz, Paul and Liu, Cricket. ***DNS and BIND***, 4th Ed. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 2001. ISBN 1-59600-158-4\r
-
-* Computer Systems Research Group, UC Berkeley. ***4.4BSD System Manager's Manual***. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56592-080-5\r
-
-* Costales, Brian, et al. ***Sendmail***, 2nd Ed. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-56592-222-0\r
-
-* Frisch, Æleen. ***Essential System Administration***, 2nd Ed. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1995. ISBN 1-56592-127-5\r
-
-* Hunt, Craig. ***TCP/IP Network Administration***, 2nd Ed. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-56592-322-7\r
-
-* Nemeth, Evi. ***UNIX System Administration Handbook***. 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall, 2000. ISBN 0-13-020601-6\r
-
-* Stern, Hal ***Managing NFS and NIS*** O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1991. ISBN 0-937175-75-7\r
-
-* [Jpman Project, Japan FreeBSD Users Group](http://www.jp.FreeBSD.org/). [FreeBSD System Administrator's Manual](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/FreeBSD/sam.html) (Japanese translation). [Mainichi Communications Inc.](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/), 1998. ISBN4-8399-0109-0 P3300E.\r
-
-* Dreyfus, Emmanuel. [Cahiers de l'Admin: BSD](http://www.editions-eyrolles.com/php.informatique/Ouvrages/9782212112443.php3) (in French), Eyrolles, 2003. ISBN 2-212-11244-0\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-hardware.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-hardware.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a1af62d..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,25 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.7 Hardware Reference \r
-\r
-
-* Anderson, Don and Tom Shanley. ***Pentium Processor System Architecture***. 2nd Ed. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-40992-5\r
-
-* Ferraro, Richard F. ***Programmer's Guide to the EGA, VGA, and Super VGA Cards***. 3rd ed. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-62490-7\r
-
-* Intel Corporation publishes documentation on their CPUs, chipsets and standards on their [developer web site](http://developer.intel.com/), usually as PDF files.\r
-
-* Shanley, Tom. ***80486 System Architecture***. 3rd ed. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-40994-1\r
-
-* Shanley, Tom. ***ISA System Architecture***. 3rd ed. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-40996-8\r
-
-* Shanley, Tom. ***PCI System Architecture***. 4th ed. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1999. ISBN 0-201-30974-2\r
-
-* Van Gilluwe, Frank. ***The Undocumented PC***, 2nd Ed. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1996. ISBN 0-201-47950-8\r
-
-* Messmer, Hans-Peter. ***The Indispensable PC Hardware Book***, 4th Ed. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 2002. ISBN 0-201-59616-4\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-history.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-history.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 23fbd05..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,29 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.8 UNIX® History \r
-\r
-
-* Lion, John ***Lion's Commentary on UNIX, 6th Ed. With Source Code***. ITP Media Group, 1996. ISBN 1573980137\r
-
-* Raymond, Eric S. ***The New Hacker's Dictionary, 3rd edition***. MIT Press, 1996. ISBN 0-262-68092-0. Also known as the [Jargon File](http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/index.html)\r
-
-* Salus, Peter H. ***A Quarter Century of UNIX***. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1994. ISBN 0-201-54777-5\r
-
-* Simon Garfinkel, Daniel Weise, Steven Strassmann. ***The UNIX-HATERS Handbook***. IDG Books Worldwide, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56884-203-1\r
-
-* Don Libes, Sandy Ressler ***Life with UNIX*** -- special edition. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1989. ISBN 0-13-536657-7\r
-
-* ***The BSD family tree***. http://www.FreeBSD.org/cgi/cvsweb.cgi/src/share/misc/bsd-family-tree or [`/usr/share/misc/bsd-family-tree`](file://localhost/usr/share/misc/bsd-family-tree) on a modern FreeBSD machine.\r
-
-* ***The BSD Release Announcements collection***. 1997. http://www.de.FreeBSD.org/de/ftp/releases/\r
-
-* ***Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library***. http://www.ncstrl.org/\r
-
-* ***Old BSD releases from the Computer Systems Research group (CSRG)***. http://www.mckusick.com/csrg/: The 4CD set covers all BSD versions from 1BSD to 4.4BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite2 (but not 2.11BSD, unfortunately). As well, the last disk holds the final sources plus the SCCS files.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
-\r
-[of History]\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-journals.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-journals.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3c79fbd..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.9 Magazines and Journals \r
-\r
-
-* ***The C/C++ Users Journal***. R&amp;D Publications Inc. ISSN 1075-2838\r
-
-* ***Sys Admin -- The Journal for UNIX System Administrators*** Miller Freeman, Inc., ISSN 1061-2688\r
-
-* ***freeX -- Das Magazin für Linux - BSD - UNIX*** (in German) Computer- und Literaturverlag GmbH, ISSN 1436-7033\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-osinternals.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-osinternals.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e7d0166..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,30 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.5 Operating System Internals \r
-\r
-
-* Andleigh, Prabhat K. ***UNIX System Architecture***. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1990. ISBN 0-13-949843-5\r
-
-* Jolitz, William. ***Porting UNIX to the 386***. ***Dr. Dobb's Journal***. January 1991-July 1992.\r
-
-* Leffler, Samuel J., Marshall Kirk Mc***Kusick, Michael J Karels and John Quarterman ***The Design and Implementation of the 4.3BSD UNIX Operating System***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1989. ISBN 0-201-06196-1\r
-
-* Leffler, Samuel J., Marshall Kirk Mc***Kusick, ***The Design and Implementation of the 4.3BSD UNIX Operating System: Answer Book***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1991. ISBN 0-201-54629-9\r
-
-* Mc***Kusick, Marshall Kirk, Keith Bostic, Michael J Karels, and John Quarterman. ***The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1996. ISBN 0-201-54979-4\r
-  (Chapter 2 of this book is available online as part of the FreeBSD Documentation Project, and chapter 9 [here](http://www.netapp.com/tech_library/nfsbook.print).)\r
-
-* Stevens, W. Richard. ***TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1996. ISBN 0-201-63346-9\r
-
-* Schimmel, Curt. ***Unix Systems for Modern Architectures***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1994. ISBN 0-201-63338-8\r
-
-* Stevens, W. Richard. ***TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 3: TCP for Transactions, HTTP, NNTP and the UNIX Domain Protocols***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1996. ISBN 0-201-63495-3\r
-
-* Vahalia, Uresh. ***UNIX Internals -- The New Frontiers***. Prentice Hall, 1996. ISBN 0-13-101908-2\r
-
-* Wright, Gary R. and W. Richard Stevens. ***TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 2: The Implementation***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-63354-X\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-programmers.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-programmers.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e7f42cd..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.4 Programmers' Guides \r
-\r
-
-* Asente, Paul, Converse, Diana, and Swick, Ralph. ***X Window System Toolkit***. Digital Press, 1998. ISBN 1-55558-178-1\r
-
-* Computer Systems Research Group, UC Berkeley. ***4.4BSD Programmer's Reference Manual***. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56592-078-3\r
-
-* Computer Systems Research Group, UC Berkeley. ***4.4BSD Programmer's Supplementary Documents***. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56592-079-1\r
-
-* Harbison, Samuel P. and Steele, Guy L. Jr. ***C: A Reference Manual***. 4rd ed. Prentice Hall, 1995. ISBN 0-13-326224-3\r
-
-* Kernighan, Brian and Dennis M. Ritchie. ***The C Programming Language.***. PTR Prentice Hall, 1988. ISBN 0-13-110362-9\r
-
-* Lehey, Greg. ***Porting UNIX Software***. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1995. ISBN 1-56592-126-7\r
-
-* Plauger, P. J. ***The Standard C Library***. Prentice Hall, 1992. ISBN 0-13-131509-9\r
-
-* Spinellis, Diomidis. [***Code Reading: The Open Source Perspective***](http://www.spinellis.gr/codereading/). Addison-Wesley, 2003. ISBN 0-201-79940-5\r
-
-* Stevens, W. Richard. ***Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1992. ISBN 0-201-56317-7\r
-
-* Stevens, W. Richard. ***UNIX Network Programming***. 2nd Ed, PTR Prentice Hall, 1998. ISBN 0-13-490012-X\r
-
-* Wells, Bill. ***Writing Serial Drivers for UNIX***. ***Dr. Dobb's Journal***. 19(15), December 1994. pp68-71, 97-99.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-security.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-security.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 2c220ef..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,15 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.6 Security Reference \r
-\r
-
-* Cheswick, William R. and Steven M. Bellovin. ***Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker***. Reading, Mass. : Addison-Wesley, 1995. ISBN 0-201-63357-4\r
-
-* Garfinkel, Simson and Gene Spafford. ***Practical UNIX &amp; Internet Security***. 2nd Ed. O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1996. ISBN 1-56592-148-8\r
-
-* Garfinkel, Simson. ***PGP Pretty Good Privacy*** O'Reilly &amp; Associates, Inc., 1995. ISBN 1-56592-098-8\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-userguides.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography-userguides.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6148517..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,28 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## B.2 Users' Guides \r
-\r
-
-* Computer Systems Research Group, UC Berkeley. ***4.4BSD User's Reference Manual***. O'Reilly &amp;amp;amp; Associates, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56592-075-9\r
-
-* Computer Systems Research Group, UC Berkeley. ***4.4BSD User's Supplementary Documents***. O'Reilly &amp;amp;amp; Associates, Inc., 1994. ISBN 1-56592-076-7\r
-
-* ***UNIX in a Nutshell***. O'Reilly &amp;amp;amp; Associates, Inc., 1990. ISBN 093717520X\r
-
-* Mui, Linda. ***What You Need To Know When You Can't Find Your UNIX System Administrator***. O'Reilly &amp;amp;amp; Associates, Inc., 1995. ISBN 1-56592-104-6\r
-
-* [Ohio State University](http://www-wks.acs.ohio-state.edu/) has written a [UNIX Introductory Course](http://www-wks.acs.ohio-state.edu/unix_course/unix.html) which is available online in HTML and PostScript format.\r
-  An Italian [../../../it_IT.ISO8859-15/books/unix-introduction/index.html translation] of this document is available as part of the FreeBSD Italian Documentation Project.\r
-
-* [Jpman Project, Japan FreeBSD Users Group](http://www.jp.FreeBSD.org/). [FreeBSD User's Reference Manual](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/FreeBSD/urm.html) (Japanese translation). [Mainichi Communications Inc.](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/), 1998. ISBN4-8399-0088-4 P3800E.\r
-
-* [Edinburgh University](http://www.ed.ac.uk/) has written an [Online Guide](http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/) for newcomers to the UNIX environment.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-bibliography\r
-\r
-[God Japanese]\r
-\r
-[Oni Japanese]\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-bibliography.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b2c10b6..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,57 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Appendix B. Bibliography \r
-\r
-\r
-While the manual pages provide the definitive reference for individual pieces of the DragonFly operating system, they are notorious for not illustrating how to put the pieces together to make the whole operating system run smoothly. For this, there is no substitute for a good book on UNIX® system administration and a good users' manual.\r
-\r
-## B.1 Books &amp; Magazines Specific to BSD \r
-\r
-***International books &amp; Magazines:***\r
-\r
-
-* [Using FreeBSD](http://jdli.tw.FreeBSD.org/publication/book/freebsd2/index.htm) (in Chinese).\r
-
-* FreeBSD for PC 98'ers (in Japanese), published by SHUWA System Co, LTD. ISBN 4-87966-468-5 C3055 P2900E.\r
-
-* FreeBSD (in Japanese), published by CUTT. ISBN 4-906391-22-2 C3055 P2400E.\r
-
-* [Complete Introduction to FreeBSD](http://www.shoeisha.com/book/Detail.asp?bid=650) (in Japanese), published by [Shoeisha Co., Ltd](http://www.shoeisha.co.jp/). ISBN 4-88135-473-6 P3600E.\r
-
-* [Personal UNIX Starter Kit FreeBSD](http://www.ascii.co.jp/pb/book1/shinkan/detail/1322785.html) (in Japanese), published by [ASCII](http://www.ascii.co.jp/). ISBN 4-7561-1733-3 P3000E.\r
-
-* FreeBSD Handbook (Japanese translation), published by [ASCII](http://www.ascii.co.jp/). ISBN 4-7561-1580-2 P3800E.\r
-
-* FreeBSD mit Methode (in German), published by [Computer und Literatur Verlag](http://www.cul.de)/Vertrieb Hanser, 1998. ISBN 3-932311-31-0.\r
-
-* [FreeBSD 4 - Installieren, Konfigurieren, Administrieren](http://www.cul.de/freebsd.html) (in German), published by [Computer und Literatur Verlag](http://www.cul.de), 2001. ISBN 3-932311-88-4.\r
-
-* [FreeBSD 5 - Installieren, Konfigurieren, Administrieren](http://www.cul.de/freebsd.html) (in German), published by [Computer und Literatur Verlag](http://www.cul.de), 2003. ISBN 3-936546-06-1.\r
-
-* [FreeBSD de Luxe](http://www.mitp.de/vmi/mitp/detail/pWert/1343/) (in German), published by [Verlag Modere Industrie](http://www.mitp.de), 2003. ISBN 3-8266-1343-0.\r
-
-* [FreeBSD Install and Utilization Manual](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/FreeBSD/install-manual.html) (in Japanese), published by [Mainichi Communications Inc.](http://www.pc.mycom.co.jp/).\r
-
-* Onno W Purbo, Dodi Maryanto, Syahrial Hubbany, Widjil Widodo ***[Building Internet Server with FreeBSD](http://maxwell.itb.ac.id/)*** (in Indonesia Language), published by [Elex Media Komputindo](http://www.elexmedia.co.id/).\r
-\r
-***English language books &amp; Magazines:***\r
-\r
-
-* [Absolute BSD: The Ultimate Guide to FreeBSD](http://www.AbsoluteBSD.com/), published by [No Starch Press](http://www.nostarch.com/), 2002. ISBN: 1886411743\r
-
-* [The Complete FreeBSD](http://www.freebsdmall.com/cgi-bin/fm/bsdcomp), published by [O'Reilly](http://www.oreilly.com/), 2003. ISBN: 0596005164\r
-
-* [The FreeBSD Corporate Networker's Guide](http://www.freebsd-corp-net-guide.com/), published by [Addison-Wesley](http://www.awl.com/aw/), 2000. ISBN: 0201704811\r
-
-* [FreeBSD: An Open-Source Operating System for Your Personal Computer](http://andrsn.stanford.edu/FreeBSD/introbook/), published by The Bit Tree Press, 2001. ISBN: 0971204500\r
-
-* Teach Yourself FreeBSD in 24 Hours, published by [Sams](http://www.samspublishing.com/), 2002. ISBN: 0672324245\r
-
-* FreeBSD unleashed, published by [Sams](http://www.samspublishing.com/), 2002. ISBN: 0672324563\r
-
-* FreeBSD: The Complete Reference, published by [McGrawHill](http://books.mcgraw-hill.com), 2003. ISBN: 0072224096\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-colophon.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-colophon.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 2a14be5..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,18 +0,0 @@
- [pgpkeys.html Prev] |  |  |\r
-"""]]\r
-----\r
-\r
-## Colophon \r
-\r
-This book is the combined work of hundreds of contributors to ***The FreeBSD Documentation Project*** and the ***The DragonFly BSD Documentation Project***. The text is authored in SGML according to the DocBook DTD and is formatted from SGML into many different presentation formats using  **Jade** , an open source DSSSL engine. Norm Walsh's DSSSL stylesheets were used with an additional customization layer to provide the presentation instructions for  **Jade** . The printed version of this document would not be possible without Donald Knuth's  **TeX**  typesetting language, Leslie Lamport's  **LaTeX** , or Sebastian Rahtz's  **JadeTeX**  macro package.\r
-\r
-----\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-|<tablestyle="width:100%"> [pgpkeys.html Prev] | [index.html Home] |  
- PGP Keys |  |  |\r
-"""]]\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-cds.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-cds.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 8aef5e2..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,248 +0,0 @@
-\r
-----\r
-\r
-## 12.5 Creating and Using Optical Media (CDs) \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Mike Meyer. ***\r
-\r
-### 12.5.1 Introduction \r
-\r
-CDs have a number of features that differentiate them from conventional disks. Initially, they were not writable by the user. They are designed so that they can be read continuously without delays to move the head between tracks. They are also much easier to transport between systems than similarly sized media were at the time.\r
-\r
-CDs do have tracks, but this refers to a section of data to be read continuously and not a physical property of the disk. To produce a CD on DragonFly, you prepare the data files that are going to make up the tracks on the CD, then write the tracks to the CD.\r
-\r
-The ISO 9660 file system was designed to deal with these differences. It unfortunately codifies file system limits that were common then. Fortunately, it provides an extension mechanism that allows properly written CDs to exceed those limits while still working with systems that do not support those extensions.\r
-\r
-The [`sysutils/mkisofs`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mkisofs) program is used to produce a data file containing an ISO 9660 file system. It has options that support various extensions, and is described below. It is installed by default.\r
-\r
-Which tool to use to burn the CD depends on whether your CD burner is ATAPI or something else. ATAPI CD burners use the `[creating-cds.html#BURNCD burncd]` program that is part of the base system. SCSI and USB CD burners should use `[creating-cds.html#CDRECORD cdrecord]` from the [`sysutils/cdrtools`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/cdrtools) port.\r
-\r
-`burncd` has a limited number of supported drives. To find out if a drive is supported, see the [CD-R/RW supported drives](http://www.freebsd.dk/ata/) list.\r
-\r
- **Note:** It ispossible to use `[creating-cds.html#CDRECORD cdrecord]` and other tools for SCSI drives on an ATAPI hardware with the [creating-cds.html#ATAPICAM ATAPI/CAM module].\r
-\r
-### 12.5.2 mkisofs \r
-\r
-[`sysutils/mkisofs`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mkisofs) produces an ISO 9660 file system that is an image of a directory tree in the UNIX® file system name space. The simplest usage is:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mkisofs -o `***imagefile.iso***` `***/path/to/tree***`\r
-\r
-\r
-This command will create an `***imagefile.iso***` containing an ISO 9660 file system that is a copy of the tree at `***/path/to/tree***`. In the process, it will map the file names to names that fit the limitations of the standard ISO 9660 file system, and will exclude files that have names uncharacteristic of ISO file systems.\r
-\r
-A number of options are available to overcome those restrictions. In particular, `-R` enables the Rock Ridge extensions common to UNIX systems, `-J` enables Joliet extensions used by Microsoft systems, and `-hfs` can be used to create HFS file systems used by Mac OS®.\r
-\r
-For CDs that are going to be used only on DragonFly systems, `-U` can be used to disable all filename restrictions. When used with `-R`, it produces a file system image that is identical to the DragonFly tree you started from, though it may violate the ISO 9660 standard in a number of ways.\r
-\r
-The last option of general use is `-b`. This is used to specify the location of the boot image for use in producing an ***El Torito*** bootable CD. This option takes an argument which is the path to a boot image from the top of the tree being written to the CD. So, given that `/tmp/myboot` holds a bootable DragonFly system with the boot image in `/tmp/myboot/boot/cdboot`, you could produce the image of an ISO 9660 file system in `/tmp/bootable.iso` like so:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mkisofs -U -R -b boot/cdboot -o /tmp/bootable.iso /tmp/myboot\r
-\r
-\r
-Having done that, if you have `vn` configured in your kernel, you can mount the file system with:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # vnconfig -e vn0c /tmp/bootable.iso\r
-    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/vn0c /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-At which point you can verify that `/mnt` and `/tmp/myboot` are identical.\r
-\r
-There are many other options you can use with [`sysutils/mkisofs`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mkisofs) to fine-tune its behavior. In particular: modifications to an ISO 9660 layout and the creation of Joliet and HFS discs. See the [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mkisofs&section8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) manual page for details.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.3 burncd \r
-\r
-If you have an ATAPI CD burner, you can use the `burncd` command to burn an ISO image onto a CD. `burncd` is part of the base system, installed as `/usr/sbin/burncd`. Usage is very simple, as it has few options:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # burncd -f `***cddevice***` data `***imagefile.iso***` fixate\r
-\r
-\r
-Will burn a copy of `***imagefile.iso***` on `***cddevice***`. The default device is `/dev/acd0c`. See [burncd(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#burncd&section8) for options to set the write speed, eject the CD after burning, and write audio data.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.4 cdrecord \r
-\r
-If you do not have an ATAPI CD burner, you will have to use `cdrecord` to burn your CDs. `cdrecord` is not part of the base system; you must install it from either the port at [`sysutils/cdrtools`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/cdrtools) or the appropriate package. Changes to the base system can cause binary versions of this program to fail, possibly resulting in a ***coaster***. You should therefore either upgrade the port when you upgrade your system.\r
-\r
-While `cdrecord` has many options, basic usage is even simpler than `burncd`. Burning an ISO 9660 image is done with:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cdrecord dev=`***device***` `***imagefile.iso***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The tricky part of using `cdrecord` is finding the `dev` to use. To find the proper setting, use the `-scanbus` flag of `cdrecord`, which might produce results like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cdrecord -scanbus\r
-    Cdrecord 1.9 (i386-unknown-freebsd4.2) Copyright (C) 1995-2000 Jörg Schilling\r
-    Using libscg version 'schily-0.1'\r
-    scsibus0:\r
-            0,0,0     0) 'SEAGATE ' 'ST39236LW       ' '0004' Disk\r
-            0,1,0     1) 'SEAGATE ' 'ST39173W        ' '5958' Disk\r
-            0,2,0     2) *\r
-            0,3,0     3) 'iomega  ' 'jaz 1GB         ' 'J.86' Removable Disk\r
-            0,4,0     4) 'NEC     ' 'CD-ROM DRIVE:466' '1.26' Removable CD-ROM\r
-            0,5,0     5) *\r
-            0,6,0     6) *\r
-            0,7,0     7) *\r
-    scsibus1:\r
-            1,0,0   100) *\r
-            1,1,0   101) *\r
-            1,2,0   102) *\r
-            1,3,0   103) *\r
-            1,4,0   104) *\r
-            1,5,0   105) 'YAMAHA  ' 'CRW4260         ' '1.0q' Removable CD-ROM\r
-            1,6,0   106) 'ARTEC   ' 'AM12S           ' '1.06' Scanner\r
-            1,7,0   107) *\r
-\r
-\r
-This lists the appropriate `dev` value for the devices on the list. Locate your CD burner, and use the three numbers separated by commas as the value for `dev`. In this case, the CRW device is 1,5,0, so the appropriate input would be `dev#1,5,0`. There are easier ways to specify this value; see [cdrecord(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?commandcdrecord&section=1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) for details. That is also the place to look for information on writing audio tracks, controlling the speed, and other things.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.5 Duplicating Audio CDs \r
-\r
-You can duplicate an audio CD by extracting the audio data from the CD to a series of files, and then writing these files to a blank CD. The process is slightly different for ATAPI and SCSI drives.\r
-\r
- **SCSI Drives** \r
-\r
-  1. Use `cdda2wav` to extract the audio.\r
-      \r
-      % cdda2wav -v255 -D2,0 -B -Owav\r
-  \r
-  1. Use `cdrecord` to write the `.wav` files.\r
-      \r
-      % cdrecord -v dev=`***2,0***` -dao -useinfo  *.wav\r
-  \r
-  Make sure that `***2.0***` is set appropriately, as described in [creating-cds.html#CDRECORD Section 12.5.4].\r
-\r
- **ATAPI Drives** \r
-\r
-  1. The ATAPI CD driver makes each track available as `/dev/acd`***d***`t`***nn******, where `***d***` is the drive number, and `***nn***` is the track number written with two decimal digits, prefixed with zero as needed. So the first track on the first disk is `/dev/acd0t01`, the second is `/dev/acd0t02`, the third is `/dev/acd0t03`, and so on.\r
-  Make sure the appropriate files exist in `/dev`.\r
-      \r
-      # cd /dev\r
-      # sh MAKEDEV acd0t99\r
-  \r
-  1. Extract each track using [dd(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#dd&section1). You must also use a specific block size when extracting the files.\r
-      \r
-      # dd if#/dev/acd0t01 oftrack1.cdr bs=2352\r
-      # dd if#/dev/acd0t02 oftrack2.cdr bs=2352\r
-      ...\r
-  \r
-  1. Burn the extracted files to disk using `burncd`. You must specify that these are audio files, and that `burncd` should fixate the disk when finished.\r
-      \r
-      # burncd -f `***/dev/acd0c***` audio track1.cdr track2.cdr `***...***` fixate\r
-  \r
-\r
-### 12.5.6 Duplicating Data CDs \r
-\r
-You can copy a data CD to a image file that is functionally equivalent to the image file created with [`sysutils/mkisofs`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mkisofs), and you can use it to duplicate any data CD. The example given here assumes that your CDROM device is `acd0c`. Substitute your correct CDROM device. A `c` must be appended to the end of the device name to indicate the entire partition or, in the case of CDROMs, the entire disc.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dd if#/dev/acd0c offile.iso bs=2048\r
-\r
-\r
-Now that you have an image, you can burn it to CD as described above.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.7 Using Data CDs \r
-\r
-Now that you have created a standard data CDROM, you probably want to mount it and read the data on it. By default, [mount(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount&section8) assumes that a file system is of type `ufs`. If you try something like:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mount /dev/cd0 /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-you will get a complaint about ***`Incorrect super block`***, and no mount. The CDROM is not a `UFS` file system, so attempts to mount it as such will fail. You just need to tell [mount(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount&section8) that the file system is of type `ISO9660`, and everything will work. You do this by specifying the `-t cd9660` option [mount(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mount&section=8). For example, if you want to mount the CDROM device, `/dev/cd0`, under `/mnt`, you would execute:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-Note that your device name (`/dev/cd0` in this example) could be different, depending on the interface your CDROM uses. Also, the `-t cd9660` option just executes [mount_cd9660(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount_cd9660&section8). The above example could be shortened to:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mount_cd9660 /dev/cd0 /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-You can generally use data CDROMs from any vendor in this way. Disks with certain ISO 9660 extensions might behave oddly, however. For example, Joliet disks store all filenames in two-byte Unicode characters. The DragonFly kernel does not speak Unicode (yet!), so non-English characters show up as question marks. (The CD9660 driver includes hooks to load an appropriate Unicode conversion table on the fly. Modules for some of the common encodings are available via the [`sysutils/cd9660_unicode`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/cd9660_unicode) port.)\r
-\r
-Occasionally, you might get ***`Device not configured`*** when trying to mount a CDROM. This usually means that the CDROM drive thinks that there is no disk in the tray, or that the drive is not visible on the bus. It can take a couple of seconds for a CDROM drive to realize that it has been fed, so be patient.\r
-\r
-Sometimes, a SCSI CDROM may be missed because it did not have enough time to answer the bus reset. If you have a SCSI CDROM please add the following option to your kernel configuration and [kernelconfig-building.html rebuild your kernel].\r
-\r
-    \r
-    options SCSI_DELAY=15000\r
-\r
-\r
-This tells your SCSI bus to pause 15 seconds during boot, to give your CDROM drive every possible chance to answer the bus reset.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.8 Burning Raw Data CDs \r
-\r
-You can choose to burn a file directly to CD, without creating an ISO 9660 file system. Some people do this for backup purposes. This runs more quickly than burning a standard CD:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # burncd -f /dev/acd1 -s 12 data archive.tar.gz fixate\r
-\r
-\r
-In order to retrieve the data burned to such a CD, you must read data from the raw device node:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tar xzvf /dev/acd1\r
-\r
-\r
-You cannot mount this disk as you would a normal CDROM. Such a CDROM cannot be read under any operating system except DragonFly. If you want to be able to mount the CD, or share data with another operating system, you must use [`sysutils/mkisofs`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mkisofs) as described above.\r
-\r
-### 12.5.9 Using the ATAPI/CAM Driver \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marc Fonvieille. ***\r
-\r
-This driver allows ATAPI devices (CD-ROM, CD-RW, DVD drives etc...) to be accessed through the SCSI subsystem, and so allows the use of applications like [`sysutils/cdrdao`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/cdrdao) or [cdrecord(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cdrecord&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports).\r
-\r
-To use this driver, you will need to add the following lines to your kernel configuration file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    device atapicam\r
-    device scbus\r
-    device cd\r
-    device pass\r
-\r
-\r
-You also need the following line in your kernel configuration file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    device ata\r
-\r
-\r
-which should already be present.\r
-\r
-Then rebuild, install your new kernel, and reboot your machine. During the boot process, your burner should show up, like so:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    acd0: CD-RW &lt;MATSHITA CD-RW/DVD-ROM UJDA740&gt; at ata1-master PIO4\r
-    cd0 at ata1 bus 0 target 0 lun 0\r
-    cd0: &lt;MATSHITA CDRW/DVD UJDA740 1.00&gt; Removable CD-ROM SCSI-0 device\r
-    cd0: 16.000MB/s transfers\r
-    cd0: Attempt to query device size failed: NOT READY, Medium not present - tray closed\r
-\r
-\r
-The drive could now be accessed via the `/dev/cd0` device name, for example to mount a CD-ROM on `/mnt`, just type the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mount -t cd9660 `***/dev/cd0***` /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-As `root`, you can run the following command to get the SCSI address of the burner:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # camcontrol devlist\r
-    &lt;MATSHITA CDRW/DVD UJDA740 1.00&gt;   at scbus1 target 0 lun 0 (pass0,cd0)\r
-\r
-\r
-So `1,0,0` will be the SCSI address to use with [cdrecord(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cdrecord&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) and other SCSI application.\r
-\r
-For more information about ATAPI/CAM and SCSI system, refer to the [atapicam(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#atapicam&section4) and [cam(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=cam&section=4) manual pages.\r
-\r
-----\r
-\r
-\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-dvds.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-dvds.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 70d8c2c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,179 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.6 Creating and Using Optical Media (DVDs) \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marc Fonvieille. ******With inputs from Andy Polyakov. ***\r
-\r
-### 12.6.1 Introduction \r
-\r
-Compared to the CD, the DVD is the next generation of optical media storage technology. The DVD can hold more data than any CD and is nowadays the standard for video publishing.\r
-\r
-Five physical recordable formats can be defined for what we will call a recordable DVD:\r
-\r
-
-* DVD-R: This was the first DVD recordable format available. The DVD-R standard is defined by the [DVD Forum](http://www.dvdforum.com/forum.shtml). This format is write once.\r
-
-* DVD-RW: This is the rewriteable version of the DVD-R standard. A DVD-RW can be rewritten about 1000 times.\r
-
-* DVD-RAM: This is also a rewriteable format supported by the DVD Forum. A DVD-RAM can be seen as a removable hard drive. However, this media is not compatible with most DVD-ROM drives and DVD-Video players; only a few DVD writers support the DVD-RAM format.\r
-
-* DVD+RW: This is a rewriteable format defined by the [DVD+RW Alliance](http://www.dvdrw.com/). A DVD+RW can be rewritten about 1000 times.\r
-
-* DVD+R: This format is the write once variation of the DVD+RW format.\r
-\r
-A single layer recordable DVD can hold up to 4,700,000,000 bytes which is actually 4.38 GB or 4485 MB (1 kilobyte is 1024 bytes).\r
-\r
- **Note:** A distinction must be made between the physical media and the application. For example, a DVD-Video is a specific file layout that can be written on any recordable DVD physical media: DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW etc. Before choosing the type of media, you must be sure that both the burner and the DVD-Video player (a standalone player or a DVD-ROM drive on a computer) are compatible with the media under consideration.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.2 Configuration \r
-\r
-The program [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) will be used to perform DVD recording. This command is part of the  **dvd+rw-tools**  utilities ([`sysutils/dvd+rw-tools`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/dvd+rw-tools)). The  **dvd+rw-tools**  support all DVD media types.\r
-\r
-These tools use the SCSI subsystem to access to the devices, therefore the [creating-cds.html#ATAPICAM ATAPI/CAM support] must be added to your kernel.\r
-\r
-You also have to enable DMA access for ATAPI devices, this can be done in adding the following line to the `/boot/loader.conf` file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    hw.ata.atapi_dma="1"\r
-\r
-\r
-Before attempting to use the  **dvd+rw-tools**  you should consult the [dvd+rw-tools' hardware compatibility notes](http://fy.chalmers.se/~appro/linux/DVD+RW/hcn.html) for any information related to your DVD burner.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.3 Burning Data DVDs \r
-\r
-The [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) command is a frontend to [creating-cds.html#MKISOFS mkisofs], it will invoke [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mkisofs&section=8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) to create the file system layout and will perform the write on the DVD. This means you do not need to create an image of the data before the burning process.\r
-\r
-To burn onto a DVD+R or a DVD-R the data from the `/path/to/data` directory, use the following command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -dvd-compat -Z `***/dev/cd0***` -J -R `***/path/to/data***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The options `-J -R` are passed to [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mkisofs&section8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) for the file system creation (in this case: an ISO 9660 file system with Joliet and Rock Ridge extensions), consult the [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mkisofs&section=8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) manual page for more details.\r
-\r
-The option `-Z` is used for the initial session recording in any case: multiple sessions or not. The DVD device, `***/dev/cd0***`, must be changed according to your configuration. The `-dvd-compat` parameter will close the disk, the recording will be unappendable. In return this should provide better media compatibility with DVD-ROM drives.\r
-\r
-It is also possible to burn a pre-mastered image, for example to burn the image `***imagefile.iso***`, we will run:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -dvd-compat -Z `***/dev/cd0***`=`***imagefile.iso***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The write speed should be detected and automatically set according to the media and the drive being used. If you want to force the write speed, use the `-speed#` parameter. For more information, read the [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?commandgrowisofs&section=1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) manual page.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.4 Burning a DVD-Video \r
-\r
-A DVD-Video is a specific file layout based on ISO 9660 and the micro-UDF (M-UDF) specifications. The DVD-Video also presents a specific data structure hierarchy, it is the reason why you need a particular program such as [`multimedia/dvdauthor`](http://pkgsrc.se/multimedia/dvdauthor) to author the DVD.\r
-\r
-If you already have an image of the DVD-Video file system, just burn it in the same way as for any image, see the previous section for an example. If you have made the DVD authoring and the result is in, for example, the directory `/path/to/video`, the following command should be used to burn the DVD-Video:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -Z `***/dev/cd0***` -dvd-video `***/path/to/video***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The `-dvd-video` option will be passed down to [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mkisofs&section8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) and will instruct it to create a DVD-Video file system layout. Beside this, the `-dvd-video` option implies `-dvd-compat` [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=growisofs&section=1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) option.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.5 Using a DVD+RW \r
-\r
-Unlike CD-RW, a virgin DVD+RW needs to be formatted before first use. The [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) program will take care of it automatically whenever appropriate, which is the ***recommended*** way. However you can use the `dvd+rw-format` command to format the DVD+RW:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dvd+rw-format `***/dev/cd0***`\r
-\r
-\r
-You need to perform this operation just once, keep in mind that only virgin DVD+RW medias need to be formatted. Then you can burn the DVD+RW in the way seen in previous sections.\r
-\r
-If you want to burn new data (burn a totally new file system not append some data) onto a DVD+RW, you do not need to blank it, you just have to write over the previous recording (in performing a new initial session), like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -Z `***/dev/cd0***` -J -R `***/path/to/newdata***`\r
-\r
-\r
-DVD+RW format offers the possibility to easily append data to a previous recording. The operation consists in merging a new session to the existing one, it is not multisession writing, [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) will ***grow*** the ISO 9660 file system present on the media.\r
-\r
-For example, if we want to append data to our previous DVD+RW, we have to use the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -M `***/dev/cd0***` -J -R `***/path/to/nextdata***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The same [mkisofs(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mkisofs&section8&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) options we used to burn the initial session should be used during next writes.\r
-\r
- **Note:** You may want to use the `-dvd-compat` option if you want better media compatibility with DVD-ROM drives. In the DVD+RW case, this will not prevent you from adding data.\r
-\r
-If for any reason you really want to blank the media, do the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -Z `***/dev/cd0***`=`***/dev/zero***`\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.6.6 Using a DVD-RW \r
-\r
-A DVD-RW accepts two disc formats: the incremental sequential one and the restricted overwrite. By default DVD-RW discs are in sequential format.\r
-\r
-A virgin DVD-RW can be directly written without the need of a formatting operation, however a non-virgin DVD-RW in sequential format needs to be blanked before to be able to write a new initial session.\r
-\r
-To blank a DVD-RW in sequential mode, run:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dvd+rw-format -blank=full `***/dev/cd0***`\r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** A full blanking (`-blank=full`) will take about one hour on a 1x media. A fast blanking can be performed using the `-blank` option if the DVD-RW will be recorded in Disk-At-Once (DAO) mode. To burn the DVD-RW in DAO mode, use the command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -use-the-force-luke#dao -Z `***/dev/cd0***``***imagefile.iso***`\r
-\r
-\r
-The `-use-the-force-luke#dao` option should not be required since [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?commandgrowisofs&section=1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) attempts to detect minimally (fast blanked) media and engage DAO write.\r
-\r
-In fact one should use restricted overwrite mode with any DVD-RW, this format is more flexible than the default incremental sequential one.\r
-\r
-To write data on a sequential DVD-RW, use the same instructions as for the other DVD formats:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -Z `***/dev/cd0***` -J -R `***/path/to/data***`\r
-\r
-\r
-If you want to append some data to your previous recording, you will have to use the [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) `-M` option. However, if you perform data addition on a DVD-RW in incremental sequential mode, a new session will be created on the disc and the result will be a multi-session disc.\r
-\r
-A DVD-RW in restricted overwrite format does not need to be blanked before a new initial session, you just have to overwrite the disc with the `-Z` option, this is similar to the DVD+RW case. It is also possible to grow an existing ISO 9660 file system written on the disc in a same way as for a DVD+RW with the `-M` option. The result will be a one-session DVD.\r
-\r
-To put a DVD-RW in the restricted overwrite format, the following command must be used:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dvd+rw-format `***/dev/cd0***`\r
-\r
-\r
-To change back to the sequential format use:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dvd+rw-format -blank=full `***/dev/cd0***`\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.6.7 Multisession \r
-\r
-Very few DVD-ROM and DVD-Video players support multisession DVDs, they will most of time, hopefully, only read the first session. DVD+R, DVD-R and DVD-RW in sequential format can accept multiple sessions, the notion of multiple sessions does not exist for the DVD+RW and the DVD-RW restricted overwrite formats.\r
-\r
-Using the following command after an initial (non-closed) session on a DVD+R, DVD-R, or DVD-RW in sequential format, will add a new session to the disc:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # growisofs -M `***/dev/cd0***` -J -R `***/path/to/nextdata***`\r
-\r
-\r
-Using this command line with a DVD+RW or a DVD-RW in restricted overwrite mode, will append data in merging the new session to the existing one. The result will be a single-session disc. This is the way used to add data after an initial write on these medias.\r
-\r
- **Note:** Some space on the media is used between each session for end and start of sessions. Therefore, one should add sessions with large amount of data to optimize media space. The number of sessions is limited to 154 for a DVD+R and about 2000 for a DVD-R.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.8 For More Information \r
-\r
-To obtain more information about a DVD, the `dvd+rw-mediainfo `***/dev/cd0****** command can be ran with the disc in the drive.\r
-\r
-More information about the  **dvd+rw-tools**  can be found in the [growisofs(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#growisofs&section1&manpath=FreeBSD+Ports) manual page, on the [dvd+rw-tools web site](http://fy.chalmers.se/~appro/linux/DVD+RW/) and in the [cdwrite mailing list](http://lists.debian.org/cdwrite/) archives.\r
-\r
- **Note:** The `dvd+rw-mediainfo` output of the resulting recording or the media with issues is mandatory for any problem report. Without this output, it will be quite impossible to help you.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-cvs-tags.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-cvs-tags.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 2837936..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,26 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## CVS Tags \r
-\r
-When obtaining or updating sources from  **cvs**  and  **CVSup**  a revision tag (reference to a date in time) must be specified.\r
-\r
-A revision tag refers to either a particular line of DragonFly development, or a specific point in time. The first type are called ***branch tags***, the second type are called ***release tags***.\r
-\r
-### Branch Tags \r
-\r
-The DragonFly tree has no branch tags at the current time.\r
-\r
-### Release Tags \r
-\r
-These tags correspond to the DragonFly `src/` tree at a specific point in time, when a particular version was released.\r
-\r
- **HEAD:** \r
-The latest bleeding-edge DragonFly code. Be warned that this is considered unstable and possibly may not build or compile at any time.\r
-\r
- **DragonFly_Preview:**  A "preview" of the latest bleeding-edge DragonFly code. The main purpose of the Preview tag is to support those users who want a fairly recent snapshot at a "reasonably stable" point in development. Under normal conditions, one should consider syncing Preview at least once a month.\r
-\r
- **DragonFly_RELEASE_X_YY:**  DragonFly Release Version X.YY\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-obtainingdragonfly\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-cvsup.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-cvsup.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e303f92..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,235 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Using CVSup \r
-\r
-### Introduction \r
-\r
- **CVSup**  is a software package for distributing and updating source trees from a master CVS repository on a remote server host. The DragonFly sources are maintained in a CVS repository on a central development machine in California. With  **CVSup** , DragonFly users can easily keep their own source trees up to date.\r
-\r
- **CVSup**  uses the so-called ***pull*** model of updating. Under the pull model, each client asks the server for updates, if and when they are wanted. The server waits passively for update requests from its clients. Thus all updates are instigated by the client. The server never sends unsolicited updates. Users must either run the  **CVSup**  client manually to get an update, or they must set up a `cron` job to run it automatically on a regular basis.\r
-\r
-The term  **CVSup** , capitalized just so, refers to the entire software package. Its main components are the client `cvsup` which runs on each user's machine, and the server `cvsupd` which runs at each of the DragonFly mirror sites that use  **CVSup** .\r
-\r
-### Installation \r
-\r
- **CVSup**  is installed by default on all DragonFly systems.\r
-\r
-### CVSup Configuration \r
-\r
- **CVSup** 's operation is controlled by a configuration file called the `supfile`. There are some sample `supfiles` in the directory [`/usr/share/examples/cvsup/`](file://localhost/usr/share/examples/cvsup/).\r
-\r
-The information in a `supfile` answers the following questions for  **CVSup** :\r
-\r
-
-* [ Which files do you want to receive?](cvsup.html#CVSUP-CONFIG-FILES)\r
-
-* [ Which versions of them do you want?](cvsup.html#CVSUP-CONFIG-VERS)\r
-
-* [ Where do you want to get them from?](cvsup.html#CVSUP-CONFIG-WHERE)\r
-
-* [ Where do you want to put them on your own machine?](cvsup.html#CVSUP-CONFIG-DEST)\r
-
-* [ Where do you want to put your status files?](cvsup.html#CVSUP-CONFIG-STATUS)\r
-\r
-In the following sections, we will construct a typical `supfile` by answering each of these questions in turn. First, we describe the overall structure of a `supfile`.\r
-\r
-A `supfile` is a text file. Comments begin with `#` and extend to the end of the line. Lines that are blank and lines that contain only comments are ignored.\r
-\r
-Each remaining line describes a set of files that the user wishes to receive. The line begins with the name of a ***collection***, a logical grouping of files defined by the server. The name of the collection tells the server which files you want. After the collection name come zero or more fields, separated by white space. These fields answer the questions listed above. There are two types of fields: flag fields and value fields. A flag field consists of a keyword standing alone, e.g., `delete` or `compress`. A value field also begins with a keyword, but the keyword is followed without intervening white space by `#` and a second word. For example, `releasecvs` is a value field.\r
-\r
-A `supfile` typically specifies more than one collection to receive. One way to structure a `supfile` is to specify all of the relevant fields explicitly for each collection. However, that tends to make the `supfile` lines quite long, and it is inconvenient because most fields are the same for all of the collections in a `supfile`.  **CVSup**  provides a defaulting mechanism to avoid these problems. Lines beginning with the special pseudo-collection name `*default` can be used to set flags and values which will be used as defaults for the subsequent collections in the `supfile`. A default value can be overridden for an individual collection, by specifying a different value with the collection itself. Defaults can also be changed or augmented in mid-supfile by additional `*default` lines.\r
-\r
-With this background, we will now proceed to construct a `supfile` for receiving and updating the main source tree of [ DragonFly](updating.html#UPDATING-SETUP).\r
-\r
-
-* Which files do you want to receive?\r
-  The files available via  **CVSup**  are organized into named groups called ***collections***. The collections that are available are described in the [ following section](cvsup.html#CVSUP-COLLEC). In this example, we wish to receive the entire main source tree for the DragonFly system. There is a single large collection `cvs-src` which will give us all of that. As a first step toward constructing our `supfile`, we simply list the collections, one per line (in this case, only one line):\r
-      \r
-      cvs-src\r
-  \r
-
-* Which version(s) of them do you want?\r
-  With  **CVSup** , you can receive virtually any version of the sources that ever existed. That is possible because the  **cvsupd**  server works directly from the CVS repository, which contains all of the versions. You specify which one of them you want using the `tag#` and `date` value fields.\r
-   **Warning:** Be very careful to specify any `tag#` fields correctly. Some tags are valid only for certain collections of files. If you specify an incorrect or misspelled tag,  **CVSup**  will delete files which you probably do not want deleted. In particular, use ***only *** `tag.` for the `ports-*` collections.\r
-  The `tag=` field names a symbolic tag in the repository. There are two kinds of tags, revision tags and branch tags. A revision tag refers to a specific revision. Its meaning stays the same from day to day. A branch tag, on the other hand, refers to the latest revision on a given line of development, at any given time. Because a branch tag does not refer to a specific revision, it may mean something different tomorrow than it means today.\r
-  [Section A.4](cvs-tags.html) contains branch tags that users might be interested in. When specifying a tag in  **CVSup** 's configuration file, it must be preceded with `tag#` (`RELENG_4` will become `tagRELENG_4`). Keep in mind that only the `tag=.` is relevant for the ports collection.\r
-   **Warning:** Be very careful to type the tag name exactly as shown.  **CVSup**  cannot distinguish between valid and invalid tags. If you misspell the tag,  **CVSup**  will behave as though you had specified a valid tag which happens to refer to no files at all. It will delete your existing sources in that case.\r
-  When you specify a branch tag, you normally receive the latest versions of the files on that line of development. If you wish to receive some past version, you can do so by specifying a date with the `date#` value field. The [cvsup(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?commandcvsup&section=1) manual page explains how to do that.\r
-  For our example, we wish to receive the current release of DragonFly. We add this line at the beginning of our `supfile`:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default tag=.\r
-  \r
-  There is an important special case that comes into play if you specify neither a `tag#` field nor a `date` field. In that case, you receive the actual RCS files directly from the server's CVS repository, rather than receiving a particular version. Developers generally prefer this mode of operation. By maintaining a copy of the repository itself on their systems, they gain the ability to browse the revision histories and examine past versions of files. This gain is achieved at a large cost in terms of disk space, however.\r
-
-* Where do you want to get them from?\r
-  We use the `host=` field to tell `cvsup` where to obtain its updates. Any of the [ CVSup mirror sites](cvsup.html#CVSUP-MIRRORS) will do, though you should try to select one that is close to you in cyberspace. In this example we will use a fictional DragonFly distribution site, `cvsup666.dragonflybsd.org`:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default host=cvsup666.dragonflybsd.org\r
-  \r
-  You will need to change the host to one that actually exists before running  **CVSup** . On any particular run of `cvsup`, you can override the host setting on the command line, with `-h `***hostname******.\r
-
-* Where do you want to put them on your own machine?\r
-  The `prefix=` field tells `cvsup` where to put the files it receives. In this example, we will put the source files directly into our main source tree, `/usr/src`. The `src` directory is already implicit in the collections we have chosen to receive, so this is the correct specification:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default prefix=/usr\r
-  \r
-
-* Where should `cvsup` maintain its status files?\r
-  The  **CVSup**  client maintains certain status files in what is called the ***base*** directory. These files help  **CVSup**  to work more efficiently, by keeping track of which updates you have already received. We will use the standard base directory, `/usr/local/etc/cvsup`:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default base=/usr/local/etc/cvsup\r
-  \r
-  This setting is used by default if it is not specified in the `supfile`, so we actually do not need the above line.\r
-  If your base directory does not already exist, now would be a good time to create it. The `cvsup` client will refuse to run if the base directory does not exist.\r
-
-* Miscellaneous `supfile` settings:\r
-  There is one more line of boiler plate that normally needs to be present in the `supfile`:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default release=cvs delete use-rel-suffix compress\r
-  \r
-  `release=cvs` indicates that the server should get its information out of the main DragonFly CVS repository. This is virtually always the case, but there are other possibilities which are beyond the scope of this discussion.\r
-  `delete` gives  **CVSup**  permission to delete files. You should always specify this, so that  **CVSup**  can keep your source tree fully up-to-date.  **CVSup**  is careful to delete only those files for which it is responsible. Any extra files you happen to have will be left strictly alone.\r
-  `use-rel-suffix` is ... arcane. If you really want to know about it, see the [cvsup(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cvsup&section1) manual page. Otherwise, just specify it and do not worry about it.\r
-  `compress` enables the use of gzip-style compression on the communication channel. If your network link is T1 speed or faster, you probably should not use compression. Otherwise, it helps substantially.\r
-
-* Putting it all together:\r
-  Here is the entire `supfile` for our example:\r
-      \r
-    
-*default tag=.\r
-    
-*default host=cvsup666.dragonflybsd.org\r
-    
-*default prefix=/usr\r
-    
-*default base=/usr/local/etc/cvsup\r
-    
-*default release=cvs delete use-rel-suffix compress\r
-      src-all\r
-  \r
-\r
-#### The refuse File \r
-\r
-As mentioned above,  **CVSup**  uses a ***pull method***. Basically, this means that you connect to the  **CVSup**  server, and it says, ***Here is what you can download from me...***, and your client responds ***OK, I will take this, this, this, and this.*** In the default configuration, the  **CVSup**  client will take every file associated with the collection and tag you chose in the configuration file. However, this is not always what you want, especially if you are synching the `doc`, `ports`, or `www` trees -- most people cannot read four or five languages, and therefore they do not need to download the language-specific files. If you are  **CVSup** ing the ports collection, you can get around this by specifying each collection individually (e.g., ***ports-astrology***, ***ports-biology***, etc instead of simply saying ***ports-all***). However, since the `doc` and `www` trees do not have language-specific collections, you must use one of  **CVSup** 's many nifty features: the `refuse` file.\r
-\r
-The `refuse` file essentially tells  **CVSup**  that it should not take every single file from a collection; in other words, it tells the client to ***refuse*** certain files from the server. The `refuse` file can be found (or, if you do not yet have one, should be placed) in ***base***`/sup/`. `***base***` is defined in your `supfile`; by default, `base` is `/usr/local/etc/cvsup`, which means that by default the `refuse` file is `/usr/local/etc/cvsup/sup/refuse`.\r
-\r
-The `refuse` file has a very simple format; it simply contains the names of files or directories that you do not wish to download. For example, if you cannot speak any languages other than English and some German, and you do not feel the need to use the German applications (or applications for any other languages, except for English), you can put the following in your `refuse` file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ports/chinese\r
-    ports/french\r
-    ports/german\r
-    ports/hebrew\r
-    ports/hungarian\r
-    ports/japanese\r
-    ports/korean\r
-    ports/polish\r
-    ports/portuguese\r
-    ports/russian\r
-    ports/ukrainian\r
-    ports/vietnamese\r
-    doc/da_*\r
-    doc/de_*\r
-    doc/el_*\r
-    doc/es_*\r
-    doc/fr_*\r
-    doc/it_*\r
-    doc/ja_*\r
-    doc/nl_*\r
-    doc/no_*\r
-    doc/pl_*\r
-    doc/pt_*\r
-    doc/ru_*\r
-    doc/sr_*\r
-    doc/zh_*\r
-\r
-\r
-and so forth for the other languages (you can find the full list by browsing the [FreeBSD CVS repository](http://www.FreeBSD.org/cgi/cvsweb.cgi/)).\r
-\r
-With this very useful feature, those users who are on slow links or pay by the minute for their Internet connection will be able to save valuable time as they will no longer need to download files that they will never use. For more information on `refuse` files and other neat features of  **CVSup** , please view its manual page.\r
-\r
-### Running CVSup \r
-\r
-You are now ready to try an update. The command line for doing this is quite simple:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cvsup `***supfile***`\r
-\r
-\r
-where ' **supfile** ' is of course the name of the `supfile` you have just created. Assuming you are running under X11, `cvsup` will display a GUI window with some buttons to do the usual things. Press the go button, and watch it run.\r
-\r
-Since you are updating your actual `/usr/src` tree in this example, you will need to run the program as `root` so that `cvsup` has the permissions it needs to update your files. Having just created your configuration file, and having never used this program before, that might understandably make you nervous. There is an easy way to do a trial run without touching your precious files. Just create an empty directory somewhere convenient, and name it as an extra argument on the command line:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mkdir /var/tmp/dest\r
-    # cvsup supfile /var/tmp/dest\r
-\r
-\r
-The directory you specify will be used as the destination directory for all file updates.  **CVSup**  will examine your usual files in `/usr/src`, but it will not modify or delete any of them. Any file updates will instead land in `/var/tmp/dest/usr/src`.  **CVSup**  will also leave its base directory status files untouched when run this way. The new versions of those files will be written into the specified directory. As long as you have read access to `/usr/src`, you do not even need to be `root` to perform this kind of trial run.\r
-\r
-If you are not running X11 or if you just do not like GUIs, you should add a couple of options to the command line when you run `cvsup`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cvsup -g -L 2 supfile\r
-\r
-\r
-The `-g` tells  **CVSup**  not to use its GUI. This is automatic if you are not running X11, but otherwise you have to specify it.\r
-\r
-The `-L 2` tells  **CVSup**  to print out the details of all the file updates it is doing. There are three levels of verbosity, from `-L 0` to `-L 2`. The default is 0, which means total silence except for error messages.\r
-\r
-There are plenty of other options available. For a brief list of them, type `cvsup -H`. For more detailed descriptions, see the manual page.\r
-\r
-Once you are satisfied with the way updates are working, you can arrange for regular runs of  **CVSup**  using [cron(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#cron&section8). Obviously, you should not let  **CVSup**  use its GUI when running it from [cron(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=cron&section=8).\r
-\r
-### CVSup File Collections \r
-\r
-The most commonly used collections is `cvs-src`\r
-\r
-`cvs-src`:: The DragonFly source code.`cvs-doc`:: Documentation. This does not include the DragonFly website.`cvs-dfports`:: Overrides for the FreeBSD Ports Collection.`cvs-site`:: The DragonFly website code.`cvs-root`:: Basic CVS data. This is only needed if you are pulling the RCS data.\r
-\r
-### For More Information \r
-\r
-For the  **CVSup**  FAQ and other information about  **CVSup** , see [The CVSup Home Page](http://www.polstra.com/projects/freeware/CVSup/).\r
-\r
-### CVSup Sites \r
-\r
-[CVSup](cvsup.html) servers for DragonFly are running at the following sites:\r
-\r
-[ Primary Mirror Sites](cvsup.html#HANDBOOK-MIRRORS-CHAPTER-SGML-MIRRORS-PRIMARY-CVSUP), [ Australia](cvsup.html#HANDBOOK-MIRRORS-CHAPTER-SGML-MIRRORS-AU-CVSUP), [ USA](cvsup.html#HANDBOOK-MIRRORS-CHAPTER-SGML-MIRRORS-US-CVSUP).\r
-\r
-(as of 2005/06/27 23:37:47 UTC)\r
-\r
- **Primary Mirror Sites** :\r
-
-* chlamydia.fs.ei.tum.de\r
-
-* cvsup.allbsd.org\r
-
-* grappa.unix-ag.uni-kl.de\r
-
-* mirror.isp.net.au\r
-
-* alxl.info\r
-
-* dragonflybsd.delphij.net\r
-
-* fred.acm.cs.rpi.edu\r
-\r
-\r
- **Australia** :\r
-
-* mirror.isp.net.au\r
-\r
- **USA** :\r
-
-* fred.acm.cs.rpi.edu\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-obtainingdragonfly\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-browsers.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-browsers.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 9fc56db..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,216 +0,0 @@
-## 15.2 Browsers 
-
-DragonFly does not come with a particular browser pre-installed. Instead, the [www](http://www.FreeBSD.org/ports/www.html) directory of the ports collection contains a lot of browsers ready to be installed. If you do not have time to compile everything (this can take a very long time in some cases) many of them are available as packages.
-
-
-
- **KDE**  and  **GNOME**  already provide HTML browsers. Please refer to [x11-wm.html Section 5.7] for more information on how to set up these complete desktops.
-
-
-
-If you are looking for light-weight browsers, you should investigate the ports collection for [`www/dillo`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/dillo), [`www/links`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/links), or [`www/w3m`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/w3m).
-
-
-
-This section covers these applications:
-
-[[!table  data="""
- Application Name | Resources Needed | Installation from Ports | Major Dependencies 
-  **Mozilla Firefox**  | heavy | heavy |  **Gtk+**  
-  **Netscape®**  | heavy | light | Linux Binary Compatibility 
-  **Opera**  | light | light | FreeBSD version (should work on DragonFly): None. Linux version: Linux Binary Compatibility and  **linux-openmotif**  |
-
-"""]]
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-### 15.2.1 Mozilla Firefox 
-
- **Mozilla Firefox**  is perhaps the most suitable browser for your DragonFly Desktop. It is modern and stable. It features a very standards-compliant HTML display engine. It provides a mail and news reader. It even has a HTML composer if you plan to write some web pages yourself. Users of  **Netscape**  will recognize the similarities with  **Communicator**  suite, as both browsers shared the same basis.
-
-
-
-On slow machines, with a CPU speed less than 233MHz or with less than 64MB of RAM,  **Mozilla Firefox**  can be too resource-consuming to be fully usable. You may want to look at the  **Opera**  browser instead, described a little later in this chapter.
-
-
-
-The Mozilla package from the network by:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # pkg_add firefox
-
-
-
-If the package is not available, and you have enough time and disk space, you can get the source for  **Mozilla** , compile it and install it on your system. This is accomplished by:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/ports/www/mozilla
-
-    # make install clean
-
-
-
-The  **Mozilla**  port ensures a correct initialization by running the chrome registry setup with `root` privileges. However, if you want to fetch some add-ons like mouse gestures, you must run  **Mozilla**  as `root` to get them properly installed.
-
-
-
-Once you have completed the installation of  **Mozilla** , you do not need to be `root` any longer. You can start  **Mozilla**  as a browser by typing:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    % mozilla
-
-
-
-You can start it directly as a mail and news reader as shown below:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    % mozilla -mail
-
-
-
-### 15.2.2 Mozilla, Java™, and Macromedia® Flash™ 
-
-***Contributed by Tom Rhodes. ***
-
-
-
-Installing  **Mozilla**  is simple, but unfortunately installing  **Mozilla**  with support for add-ons like Java™ and Macromedia® Flash™ consumes both time and disk space.
-
-
-
-The first thing is to download the files which will be used with  **Mozilla** . Take your current web browser up to http://www.sun.com/software/java2/download.html and create an account on their website. Remember to save the username and password from here as it may be needed in the future. Download a copy of the file `j2sdk-1_3_1-src.tar.gz` and place this in `/usr/ports/distfiles/` as the port will not fetch it automatically. This is due to license restrictions. While we are here, download the ***java environment*** from http://java.sun.com/webapps/download/Display?BundleId=7905. The filename is `j2sdk-1_3_1_08-linux-i586.bin` and is large (about 25 megabytes!). Like before, this file must be placed into `/usr/ports/distfiles/`. Finally download a copy of the ***java patchkit*** from http://www.eyesbeyond.com/freebsddom/java/ and place it into `/usr/ports/distfiles/`.
-
-
-
-Install the [`java/jdk13`](http://pkgsrc.se/java/jdk13) port with the standard `make install clean` and then install the [`www/flashpluginwrapper`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/flashpluginwrapper) port. This port requires [`emulators/linux_base`](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/linux_base) which is a large port. True that other  **Flash**  plugins exist, however they have not worked for me.
-
-
-
-Install the [`www/mozilla`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/mozilla) port, if  **Mozilla**  is not already installed.
-
-
-
-Now copy the  **Flash**  plug-in files with:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cp /usr/local/lib/flash/libflashplayer.so \
-
-            /usr/X11R6/lib/browser_plugins/libflashplayer_linux.so
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cp /usr/local/lib/flash/ShockwaveFlash.class \
-
-            /usr/X11R6/lib/browser_plugins/
-
-
-
-Now add the following lines to the top of (but right under `#!/bin/sh`)  **Mozilla**  startup script: `/usr/X11R6/bin/mozilla`.
-
-
-
-    
-
-    LD_PRELOAD=/usr/local/lib/libflashplayer.so.1
-
-    export LD_PRELOAD
-
-
-
-This will enable the  **Flash**  plug-in.
-
-
-
-Now just start  **Mozilla**  with:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    % mozilla &amp;
-
-
-
-And access the About Plug-ins option from the Help menu. A list should appear with all the currently available plugins.  **Java**  and  **Shockwave® Flash**  should both be listed.
-
-
-
-### 15.2.3 Netscape® 
-
-The ports collection contains several versions of the Netscape browser. Since the native FreeBSD ones contain a serious security bug, installing them is strongly discouraged. Instead, use a more recent Linux or DIGITAL UNIX version.
-
-Netscape is no longer supported by AOL. AOL recommends people to switch to Firefox with a Netscape theme.
-
-
-
-The latest stable release of the Netscape browser is  **Netscape 7** . It can be installed from the ports collection:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/ports/www/netscape7
-
-    # make install clean
-
-
-
-There are localized versions in the French, German, and Japanese categories.
-
-
-
- **Caution:**  **Netscape 4.x**  versions are not recommended because they are not compliant with today's standards. However,  **Netscape 7.x**  and newer versions are only available for the i386™ platform.
-
-
-
-### 15.2.4 Opera 
-
- **Opera**  is a very fast, full-featured, and standards-compliant browser. It comes in a version that runs under Linux emulation. Opera is free for personal & commercial use, but not open source.
-
-
-
-To browse the Web with  **Opera** , install the package:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # pkg_add opera
-
-
-
-Some FTP sites do not have all the packages, but the same result can be obtained with the ports collection by typing:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/ports/www/opera
-
-    # make install clean
-
-
-
-CategoryHandbook CategoryHandbook-desktop
-
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-finance.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-finance.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index bbedf31..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,71 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 15.5 Finance \r
-\r
-If, for any reason, you would like to manage your personal finances on your DragonFly Desktop, there are some powerful and easy to use applications ready to be installed. Some of them are compatible with widespread file formats like those of  **Quicken®**  or  **Excel**  documents.\r
-\r
-This section covers these applications:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Application Name | Resources Needed | Installation from Ports | Major Dependencies 
-  **GnuCash**  | light | heavy |  **GNOME**  
-  **Gnumeric**  | light | heavy |  **GNOME**  
-  **Abacus**  | light | light |  **Tcl/Tk**  |\r
-"""]]\r
-### 15.5.1 GnuCash \r
-\r
- **GnuCash**  is part of the  **GNOME**  effort to provide user-friendly yet powerful applications to end-users. With  **GnuCash** , you can keep track of your income and expenses, your bank accounts, or your stocks. It features an intuitive interface while remaining very professional.\r
-\r
- **GnuCash**  provides a smart register, a hierarchical system of accounts, many keyboard accelerators and auto-completion methods. It can split a single transaction into several more detailed pieces.  **GnuCash**  can import and merge  **Quicken**  QIF files. It also handles most international date and currency formats.\r
-\r
-To install  **GnuCash**  on your system, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add gnucash\r
-\r
-\r
-If the package is not available, you can use the ports collection:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/finance/gnucash\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-### 15.5.2 Gnumeric \r
-\r
- **Gnumeric**  is a spreadsheet, part of the  **GNOME**  desktop environment. It features convenient automatic ***guessing*** of user input according to the cell format and an autofill system for many sequences. It can import files in a number of popular formats like those of  **Excel** , ***'Lotus 1-2-3***', or  **Quattro Pro** .  **Gnumeric**  supports graphs through the [`math/guppi`](http://pkgsrc.se/math/guppi) graphing program. It has a large number of built-in functions and allows all of the usual cell formats such as number, currency, date, time, and much more.\r
-\r
-To install  **Gnumeric**  as a package, type in:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add gnumeric\r
-\r
-\r
-If the package is not available, you can use the ports collection by doing:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/math/gnumeric\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-### 15.5.3 Abacus \r
-\r
- **Abacus**  is a small and easy to use spreadsheet. It includes many built-in functions useful in several domains such as statistics, finances, and mathematics. It can import and export the  **Excel**  file format.  **Abacus**  can produce PostScript® output.\r
-\r
-To install  **Abacus**  from its package, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add abacus\r
-\r
-\r
-If the package is not available, you can use the ports collection by doing:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/deskutils/abacus\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-desktop\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-productivity.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-productivity.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3f1b40e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,166 +0,0 @@
-## 15.3 Productivity 
-
-
-
-When it comes to productivity, new users often look for a good office suite or a friendly word processor. While some [x11-wm.html desktop environments] like  **KDE**  already provide an office suite, there is no default application. DragonFly provides all that is needed, regardless of your desktop environment.
-
-
-
-This section covers these applications:
-
-
-
-[[!table  data="""
-| Application Name | Resources Needed | Installation from Ports | Major Dependencies 
-  **KOffice**  | light | heavy |  **KDE**  
-  **AbiWord**  | light | light |  **Gtk+**  or  **GNOME**  
-  **The Gimp**  | light | heavy |  **Gtk+**  
-  **OpenOffice.org**  | heavy | huge | ***'GCC 3.1***', ***'JDK™ 1.3***',  **Mozilla**  |
-
-"""]]
-
-### 15.3.1 KOffice 
-
-
-
-The KDE community has provided its desktop environment with an office suite which can be used outside  **KDE** . It includes the four standard components that can be found in other office suites.  **KWord**  is the word processor,  **KSpread**  is the spreadsheet program,  **KPresenter**  manages slide presentations, and  **Kontour**  lets you draw graphical documents.
-
-
-
-Before installing the latest  **KOffice** , make sure you have an up-to-date version of  **KDE** .
-
-
-
-To install  **KOffice**  as a package, you can use the ports collection. For instance, to install  **KOffice**  for ***'KDE3***', do:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/pkgsrc/misc/koffice
-
-    # bmake install clean
-
-
-
-
-
-### 15.3.2 AbiWord 
-
-
-
- **AbiWord**  is a free word processing program similar in look and feel to  **Microsoft® Word** . It is suitable for typing papers, letters, reports, memos, and so forth. It is very fast, contains many features, and is very user-friendly.
-
-
-
- **AbiWord**  can import or export many file formats, including some proprietary ones like Microsoft `.doc`.
-
-
-
- **AbiWord**  is available as a package. You can install it by:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # pkg_radd abiword
-
-or
-
-    # pkgin in abiword
-
-
-
-If the package is not available, it can be compiled from the ports collection. The ports collection should be more up to date. It can be done as follows:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/pkgsrc/editors/abiword
-
-    # bmake install clean
-
-
-
-
-
-### 15.3.3 The GIMP 
-
-
-
-For image authoring or picture retouching,  **The GIMP**  is a very sophisticated image manipulation program. It can be used as a simple paint program or as a quality photo retouching suite. It supports a large number of plug-ins and features a scripting interface.  **The GIMP**  can read and write a wide range of file formats. It supports interfaces with scanners and tablets.
-
-
-
-You can install the package by issuing this command:
-
-    
-
-    # pkg_radd gimp-2.6
-
-or 
-
-    # pkgin in gimp-2.6
-
-
-If your FTP site does not have this package, you can use the ports collection. The [graphics](http://www.FreeBSD.org/ports/graphics.html) directory of the ports collection also contains  **The Gimp Manual** . Here is how to get them installed:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # cd /usr/pkgsrc/graphics/gimp
-
-    # bmake install clean
-
-    
-
-### 15.3.4 OpenOffice.org 
-
-
-
- **OpenOffice.org**  includes all of the mandatory applications in a complete office productivity suite: a word processor, a spreadsheet, a presentation manager, and a drawing program. Its user interface is very similar to other office suites, and it can import and export in various popular file formats. It is available in a number of different languages including interfaces, spell checkers, and dictionaries.
-
-
-
-The word processor of  **OpenOffice.org**  uses a native XML file format for increased portability and flexibility. The spreadsheet program features a macro language and it can be interfaced with external databases.  **OpenOffice.org**  is already stable and runs natively on Windows®, Solaris™, Linux, FreeBSD, and Mac OS® X. More information about  **OpenOffice.org**  can be found on the [OpenOffice web site](http://www.openoffice.org/). For FreeBSD specific information, and to directly download packages use the [FreeBSD OpenOffice Porting Team](http://projects.imp.ch/openoffice/)'s web site. These packages should work on DragonFly.
-
-
-
-To install  **OpenOffice.org**:
-
-  
-Load linux module into kernel 
-
-    #kldload linux
-
-Add to /boot/loader.conf:
-    #echo 'linux_enable="YES"' >> /boot/loader.conf
-
-Then
-    #cd /usr/pkgsrc/emulators/suse100_base
-    #bmake install clean
-
-Install  OpenOffice:
-
-    #cd /usr/pkgsrc/misc/openoffice3-bin
-    #bmake install clean
-
-Use: 
-
-    %soffice 
-
-to start openoffice.org application menu. 
-
-With default settings it will probably fail to save any document.
-
-You have to create a /tmp directory inside your user home folder with full read&write privileges. 
-Then inside swriter, go to Tools → Options → Paths and change path for Temporary files (point to /tmp folder with full read&write privileges (for user) created earlier.
-    
-CategoryHandbook
-
-CategoryHandbook-desktop
-
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-summary.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-summary.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ada6ee8..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 15.6 Summary \r
-\r
-DragonFly is quite ready for day-to-day use as a desktop. With several thousand applications available as [packages](http://www.FreeBSD.org/where.html) or [ports](http://www.FreeBSD.org/ports/index.html), you can build a perfect desktop that suits all your needs.\r
-\r
-Once you have achieved the installation of your desktop, you may want to go one step further with [`misc/instant-workstation`](http://pkgsrc.se/misc/instant-workstation). This ***meta-port*** allows you to build a typical set of ports for a workstation. You can customize it by editing `/usr/ports/misc/instant-workstation/Makefile`. Follow the syntax used for the default set to add or remove ports, and build it with the usual procedure. Eventually, you will be able to create a big package that corresponds to your very own desktop and install it to your other workstations!\r
-\r
-Here is a quick review of all the desktop applications covered in this chapter:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Application Name | Package Name | Ports Name 
-  **Mozilla**  | `mozilla` | [`www/mozilla`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/mozilla) 
-  **Netscape®**  | `linux-netscape7` | [`www/netscape7`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/netscape7) 
-  **Opera**  | `linux-opera` | [`www/linux-opera`](http://pkgsrc.se/www/linux-opera) 
-  **KOffice**  | `koffice-kde3` | [`editors/koffice-kde3`](http://pkgsrc.se/editors/koffice-kde3) 
-  **AbiWord**  | `AbiWord` | [`editors/AbiWord`](http://pkgsrc.se/editors/AbiWord) 
-  **The GIMP**  | `gimp` | [`graphics/gimp1`](http://pkgsrc.se/graphics/gimp1) 
-  **OpenOffice.org**  | `openoffice` | [`editors/openoffice`](http://pkgsrc.se/editors/openoffice) 
-  **Acrobat Reader®**  | `acroread5` | [`print/acroread5`](http://pkgsrc.se/print/acroread5) 
-  **gv**  | `gv` | [`print/gv`](http://pkgsrc.se/print/gv) 
-  **Xpdf**  | `xpdf` | [`graphics/xpdf`](http://pkgsrc.se/graphics/xpdf) 
-  **GQview**  | `gqview` | [`graphics/gqview`](http://pkgsrc.se/graphics/gqview) 
-  **GnuCash**  | `gnucash` | [`finance/gnucash`](http://pkgsrc.se/finance/gnucash) 
-  **Gnumeric**  | `gnumeric` | [`math/gnumeric`](http://pkgsrc.se/math/gnumeric) 
-  **Abacus**  | `abacus` | [`deskutils/abacus`](http://pkgsrc.se/deskutils/abacus) |\r
-"""]]\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-desktop\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-viewers.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop-viewers.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a6b87e6..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,91 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 15.4 Document Viewers \r
-\r
-Some new document formats have recently gained popularity. The standard viewers they require may not be available in the base system. We will see how to install them in this section.\r
-\r
-This section covers these applications:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Application Name | Resources Needed | Installation from Ports | Major Dependencies 
-  **Acrobat Reader®**  | light | light | Linux Binary Compatibility 
-  **gv**  | light | light | ***'Xaw3d***' 
-  **Xpdf**  | light | light |  **FreeType**  
-  **GQview**  | light | light |  **Gtk+**  or  **GNOME**  |\r
-"""]]\r
-### 15.4.1 Acrobat Reader® \r
-\r
-Many documents are now distributed as PDF files, which stands for ***Portable Document Format***. One of the recommended viewers for these types of files is  **Acrobat Reader** , released by Adobe for Linux. As DragonFly can run Linux binaries, it is also available for DragonFly.\r
-\r
-To install the  **Acrobat Reader 5**  package, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add acroread5\r
-\r
-\r
-As usual, if the package is not available or you want the latest version, you can use the ports collection as well:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/print/acroread5\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:**  **Acrobat Reader**  is available in several different versions. At this time of writing, there are: [`print/acroread`](http://pkgsrc.se/print/acroread) (version 3.0.2), [`print/acroread4`](http://pkgsrc.se/print/acroread4) (version 4.0.5), and [`print/acroread5`](http://pkgsrc.se/print/acroread5) (version 5.0.6). They may not all have been packaged for your version of DragonFly. The ports collection will always contain the latest versions.\r
-\r
-### 15.4.2 gv \r
-\r
- **gv**  is a PostScript® and PDF viewer. It is originally based on  **ghostview**  but it has a nicer look thanks to the ***'Xaw3d ** library. It is fast and its interface is clean.** gv***' has many features like orientation, paper size, scale, or antialias. Almost any operation can be done either from the keyboard or the mouse.\r
-\r
-To install  **gv**  as a package, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add gv\r
-\r
-\r
-If you cannot get the package, you can use the ports collection:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/print/gv\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-### 15.4.3 Xpdf \r
-\r
-If you want a small DragonFly PDF viewer,  **Xpdf**  is a light-weight and efficient viewer. It requires very few resources and is very stable. It uses the standard X fonts and does not require  **Motif®**  or any other X toolkit.\r
-\r
-To install the  **Xpdf**  package, issue this command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add xpdf\r
-\r
-\r
-If the package is not available or you prefer to use the ports collection, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/graphics/xpdf\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-Once the installation is complete, you can launch  **Xpdf**  and use the right mouse button to activate the menu.\r
-\r
-### 15.4.4 GQview \r
-\r
- **GQview**  is an image manager. You can view a file with a single click, launch an external editor, get thumbnail previews, and much more. It also features a slideshow mode and some basic file operations. You can manage image collections and easily find duplicates.  **GQview**  can do full screen viewing and supports internationalization.\r
-\r
-If you want to install the  **GQview**  package, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # pkg_add gqview\r
-\r
-\r
-If the package is not available or you prefer to use the ports collection, do:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/ports/graphics/gqview\r
-    # make install clean\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-desktop\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-desktop.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index adb04b0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,53 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 15 Desktop Applications \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 15.1 [ Synopsis](desktop.html#DESKTOP-SYNOPSIS)\r
-
-* 15.2 [Browsers](desktop-browsers.html)\r
-
-* 15.3 [Productivity](desktop-productivity.html)\r
-
-* 15.4 [Document Viewers](desktop-viewers.html)\r
-
-* 15.5 [Finance](desktop-finance.html)\r
-
-* 15.6 [Summary](desktop-summary.html)\r
-***Contributed by Christophe Juniet. ***\r
-\r
-## 15.1 Synopsis \r
-\r
-DragonFly can run a wide variety of desktop applications, such as browsers and word processors. Most of these are available as packages or can be automatically built from the ports collection. Many new users expect to find these kinds of applications on their desktop. This chapter will show you how to install some popular desktop applications effortlessly, either from their packages or from the ports collection.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** This chapter contains a number of outdated references to the FreeBSD ports collection. Most instructions still apply to pkgsrc, but proceed with caution until this chapter is updated.\r
-\r
-Note that when installing programs from the ports, they are compiled from source. This can take a very long time, depending on what you are compiling and the processing power of your machine(s). If building from source takes a prohibitively long amount of time for you, you can install most of the programs of the ports collection from pre-built packages.\r
-\r
-As DragonFly features Linux binary compatibility, many applications originally developed for Linux are available for your desktop. It is strongly recommended that you read [Chapter 22](linuxemu.html) before installing any of the Linux applications. Many of the ports using the Linux binary compatibility start with ***linux-***. Remember this when you search for a particular port, for instance with [whereis(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#whereis&section1). In the following text, it is assumed that you have enabled Linux binary compatibility before installing any of the Linux applications.\r
-\r
-Here are the categories covered by this chapter:\r
-\r
-
-* Browsers (such as  **Mozilla** ,  **Netscape®** ,  **Opera** )\r
-
-* Productivity (such as  **KOffice** ,  **AbiWord** ,  **The GIMP** ,  **OpenOffice.org** )\r
-
-* Document Viewers (such as  **Acrobat Reader®** ,  **gv** ,  **Xpdf** ,  **GQview** )\r
-
-* Finance (such as  **GnuCash** ,  **Gnumeric** ,  **Abacus** )\r
-\r
-Before reading this chapter, you should:\r
-\r
-
-* Know how to install additional third-party software ([Chapter 4](pkgsrc.html)).\r
-
-* Know how to install additional Linux software ([Chapter 22](linuxemu.html)).\r
-\r
-For information on how to get a multimedia environment, [Chapter 16](multimedia.html). If you want to set up and use electronic mail, please refer to [Chapter 20](mail.html).\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-dialout.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-dialout.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 8c28dee..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,173 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 17.5 Dial-out Service \r
-\r
-The following are tips for getting your host to be able to connect over the modem to another computer. This is appropriate for establishing a terminal session with a remote host.\r
-\r
-This is useful to log onto a BBS.\r
-\r
-This kind of connection can be extremely helpful to get a file on the Internet if you have problems with PPP. If you need to FTP something and PPP is broken, use the terminal session to FTP it. Then use zmodem to transfer it to your machine.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.1 My Stock Hayes Modem Is Not Supported, What Can I Do? \r
-\r
-Actually, the manual page for `tip` is out of date. There is a generic Hayes dialer already built in. Just use `at=hayes` in your `/etc/remote` file.\r
-\r
-The Hayes driver is not smart enough to recognize some of the advanced features of newer modems--messages like `BUSY`, `NO DIALTONE`, or `CONNECT 115200` will just confuse it. You should turn those messages off when you use `tip` (using `ATX0&amp;W`).\r
-\r
-Also, the dial timeout for `tip` is 60 seconds. Your modem should use something less, or else tip will think there is a communication problem. Try `ATS7=45&amp;W`.\r
-\r
- **Note:** As shipped, `tip` does not yet support Hayes modems fully. The solution is to edit the file `tipconf.h` in the directory `/usr/src/usr.bin/tip/tip`. Obviously you need the source distribution to do this.\r
-\r
-Edit the line `#define HAYES 0` to `#define HAYES 1`. Then `make` and `make install`. Everything works nicely after that.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.2 How Am I Expected to Enter These AT Commands? \r
-\r
-Make what is called a ***direct*** entry in your `/etc/remote` file. For example, if your modem is hooked up to the first serial port, `/dev/cuaa0`, then put in the following line:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    cuaa0:dv#/dev/cuaa0:br#19200:panone\r
-\r
-\r
-Use the highest bps rate your modem supports in the br capability. Then, type `tip cuaa0` and you will be connected to your modem.\r
-\r
-If there is no `/dev/cuaa0` on your system, do this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /dev\r
-    # sh MAKEDEV cuaa0\r
-\r
-\r
-Or use `cu` as `root` with the following command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cu -l`***line***` -s`***speed***`\r
-\r
-\r
-`***line***` is the serial port (e.g.`/dev/cuaa0`) and `***speed***` is the speed (e.g.`57600`). When you are done entering the AT commands hit  **~.**  to exit.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.3 The `@` Sign for the pn Capability Does Not Work! \r
-\r
-The `@` sign in the phone number capability tells tip to look in `/etc/phones` for a phone number. But the `@` sign is also a special character in capability files like `/etc/remote`. Escape it with a backslash:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    pn=\@\r
-\r
-\r
-### 17.5.4 How Can I Dial a Phone Number on the Command Line? \r
-\r
-Put what is called a ***generic*** entry in your `/etc/remote` file. For example:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    tip115200|Dial any phone number at 115200 bps:\\r
-            :dv#/dev/cuaa0:br#115200:athayes:pa=none:du:\r
-    tip57600|Dial any phone number at 57600 bps:\\r
-            :dv#/dev/cuaa0:br#57600:athayes:pa=none:du:\r
-\r
-\r
-Then you can do things like:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # tip -115200 5551234\r
-\r
-\r
-If you prefer `cu` over `tip`, use a generic `cu` entry:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    cu115200|Use cu to dial any number at 115200bps:\\r
-            :dv#/dev/cuaa1:br#57600:athayes:pa=none:du:\r
-\r
-\r
-and type:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cu 5551234 -s 115200\r
-\r
-\r
-### 17.5.5 Do I Have to Type in the bps Rate Every Time I Do That? \r
-\r
-Put in an entry for `tip1200` or `cu1200`, but go ahead and use whatever bps rate is appropriate with the br capability. `tip` thinks a good default is 1200 bps which is why it looks for a `tip1200` entry. You do not have to use 1200 bps, though.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.6 I Access a Number of Hosts Through a Terminal Server \r
-\r
-Rather than waiting until you are connected and typing `CONNECT &lt;host&gt;` each time, use tip's `cm` capability. For example, these entries in `/etc/remote`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    pain|pain.deep13.com|Forrester's machine:\\r
-            :cm#CONNECT pain\n:tcdeep13:\r
-    muffin|muffin.deep13.com|Frank's machine:\\r
-            :cm#CONNECT muffin\n:tcdeep13:\r
-    deep13:Gizmonics Institute terminal server:\\r
-            :dv#/dev/cuaa2:br#38400:athayes:du:pa=none:pn=5551234:\r
-\r
-\r
-will let you type `tip pain` or `tip muffin` to connect to the hosts pain or muffin, and `tip deep13` to get to the terminal server.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.7 Can Tip Try More Than One Line for Each Site? \r
-\r
-This is often a problem where a university has several modem lines and several thousand students trying to use them.\r
-\r
-Make an entry for your university in `/etc/remote` and use `@` for the `pn` capability:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    big-university:\\r
-            :pn#\@:tcdialout\r
-    dialout:\\r
-            :dv#/dev/cuaa3:br#9600:atcourier:du:pa=none:\r
-\r
-\r
-Then, list the phone numbers for the university in `/etc/phones`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    big-university 5551111\r
-    big-university 5551112\r
-    big-university 5551113\r
-    big-university 5551114\r
-\r
-\r
-`tip` will try each one in the listed order, then give up. If you want to keep retrying, run `tip` in a while loop.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.8 Why Do I Have to Hit  **Ctrl** + **P**  Twice to Send  **Ctrl** + **P**  Once? \r
-\r
- **Ctrl** + **P**  is the default ***force*** character, used to tell `tip` that the next character is literal data. You can set the force character to any other character with the `~s` escape, which means ***set a variable.***\r
-\r
-Type `~sforce=`***single-char****** followed by a newline. `***single-char***` is any single character. If you leave out `***single-char***`, then the force character is the nul character, which you can get by typing  **Ctrl** + **2**  or  **Ctrl** + **Space** . A pretty good value for `***single-char***` is  **Shift** + **Ctrl** + **6** , which is only used on some terminal servers.\r
-\r
-You can have the force character be whatever you want by specifying the following in your `$HOME/.tiprc` file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    force=&lt;single-char&gt;\r
-\r
-\r
-### 17.5.9 Suddenly Everything I Type Is in Upper Case?? \r
-\r
-You must have pressed  **Ctrl** + **A** , `tip`'s ***raise character,*** specially designed for people with broken caps-lock keys. Use `~s` as above and set the variable `raisechar` to something reasonable. In fact, you can set it to the same as the force character, if you never expect to use either of these features.\r
-\r
-Here is a sample .tiprc file perfect for  **Emacs**  users who need to type  **Ctrl** + **2**  and  **Ctrl** + **A**  a lot:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    force=^^\r
-    raisechar=^^\r
-\r
-\r
-The ^^ is  **Shift** + **Ctrl** + **6** .\r
-\r
-### 17.5.10 How Can I Do File Transfers with `tip`? \r
-\r
-If you are talking to another UNIX® system, you can send and receive files with `~p` (put) and `~t` (take). These commands run `cat` and `echo` on the remote system to accept and send files. The syntax is:\r
-\r
-`~p` local-file [remote-file]\r
-\r
-`~t` remote-file [local-file]\r
-\r
-There is no error checking, so you probably should use another protocol, like zmodem.\r
-\r
-### 17.5.11 How Can I Run zmodem with `tip`? \r
-\r
-To receive files, start the sending program on the remote end. Then, type `~C rz` to begin receiving them locally.\r
-\r
-To send files, start the receiving program on the remote end. Then, type `~C sz `***files****** to send them to the remote system.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-serial\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-dialup.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-dialup.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 52b6b41..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,303 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 17.4 Dial-in Service \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Guy Helmer. ******Additions by Sean Kelly. ***\r
-\r
-Configuring your DragonFly system for dial-in service is very similar to connecting terminals except that you are dealing with modems instead of terminals.\r
-\r
-### 17.4.1 External vs. Internal Modems \r
-\r
-External modems seem to be more convenient for dial-up, because external modems often can be semi-permanently configured via parameters stored in non-volatile RAM and they usually provide lighted indicators that display the state of important RS-232 signals. Blinking lights impress visitors, but lights are also very useful to see whether a modem is operating properly.\r
-\r
-Internal modems usually lack non-volatile RAM, so their configuration may be limited only to setting DIP switches. If your internal modem has any signal indicator lights, it is probably difficult to view the lights when the system's cover is in place.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.1.1 Modems and Cables \r
-\r
-If you are using an external modem, then you will of course need the proper cable. A standard RS-232C serial cable should suffice as long as all of the normal signals are wired:\r
-\r
-
-* Transmitted Data (SD)\r
-
-* Received Data (RD)\r
-
-* Request to Send (RTS)\r
-
-* Clear to Send (CTS)\r
-
-* Data Set Ready (DSR)\r
-
-* Data Terminal Ready (DTR)\r
-
-* Carrier Detect (CD)\r
-
-* Signal Ground (SG)\r
-\r
-DragonFly needs the RTS and CTS signals for flow-control at speeds above 2400 bps, the CD signal to detect when a call has been answered or the line has been hung up, and the DTR signal to reset the modem after a session is complete. Some cables are wired without all of the needed signals, so if you have problems, such as a login session not going away when the line hangs up, you may have a problem with your cable.\r
-\r
-Like other UNIX® like operating systems, DragonFly uses the hardware signals to find out when a call has been answered or a line has been hung up and to hangup and reset the modem after a call. DragonFly avoids sending commands to the modem or watching for status reports from the modem. If you are familiar with connecting modems to PC-based bulletin board systems, this may seem awkward.\r
-\r
-### 17.4.2 Serial Interface Considerations \r
-\r
-DragonFly supports NS8250-, NS16450-, NS16550-, and NS16550A-based EIA RS-232C (CCITT V.24) communications interfaces. The 8250 and 16450 devices have single-character buffers. The 16550 device provides a 16-character buffer, which allows for better system performance. (Bugs in plain 16550's prevent the use of the 16-character buffer, so use 16550A's if possible). Because single-character-buffer devices require more work by the operating system than the 16-character-buffer devices, 16550A-based serial interface cards are much preferred. If the system has many active serial ports or will have a heavy load, 16550A-based cards are better for low-error-rate communications.\r
-\r
-### 17.4.3 Quick Overview \r
-\r
-As with terminals, `init` spawns a `getty` process for each configured serial port for dial-in connections. For example, if a modem is attached to `/dev/ttyd0`, the command `ps ax` might show this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-     4850 ??  I      0:00.09 /usr/libexec/getty V19200 ttyd0\r
-\r
-\r
-When a user dials the modem's line and the modems connect, the CD (Carrier Detect) line is reported by the modem. The kernel notices that carrier has been detected and completes `getty`'s open of the port. `getty` sends a login: prompt at the specified initial line speed. `getty` watches to see if legitimate characters are received, and, in a typical configuration, if it finds junk (probably due to the modem's connection speed being different than `getty`'s speed), `getty` tries adjusting the line speeds until it receives reasonable characters.\r
-\r
-After the user enters his/her login name, `getty` executes `/usr/bin/login`, which completes the login by asking for the user's password and then starting the user's shell.\r
-\r
-### 17.4.4 Configuration Files \r
-\r
-There are three system configuration files in the `/etc` directory that you will probably need to edit to allow dial-up access to your DragonFly system. The first, `/etc/gettytab`, contains configuration information for the `/usr/libexec/getty` daemon. Second, `/etc/ttys` holds information that tells `/sbin/init` what `tty` devices should have `getty` processes running on them. Lastly, you can place port initialization commands in the `/etc/rc.serial` script.\r
-\r
-There are two schools of thought regarding dial-up modems on UNIX. One group likes to configure their modems and systems so that no matter at what speed a remote user dials in, the local computer-to-modem RS-232 interface runs at a locked speed. The benefit of this configuration is that the remote user always sees a system login prompt immediately. The downside is that the system does not know what a user's true data rate is, so full-screen programs like Emacs will not adjust their screen-painting methods to make their response better for slower connections.\r
-\r
-The other school configures their modems' RS-232 interface to vary its speed based on the remote user's connection speed. For example, V.32bis (14.4 Kbps) connections to the modem might make the modem run its RS-232 interface at 19.2 Kbps, while 2400 bps connections make the modem's RS-232 interface run at 2400 bps. Because `getty` does not understand any particular modem's connection speed reporting, `getty` gives a login: message at an initial speed and watches the characters that come back in response. If the user sees junk, it is assumed that they know they should press the Enter key until they see a recognizable prompt. If the data rates do not match, `getty` sees anything the user types as ***junk***, tries going to the next speed and gives the login: prompt again. This procedure can continue ad nauseam, but normally only takes a keystroke or two before the user sees a good prompt. Obviously, this login sequence does not look as clean as the former ***locked-speed*** method, but a user on a low-speed connection should receive better interactive response from full-screen programs.\r
-\r
-This section will try to give balanced configuration information, but is biased towards having the modem's data rate follow the connection rate.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.4.1 `/etc/gettytab` \r
-\r
-`/etc/gettytab` is a [termcap(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#termcap&section5)-style file of configuration information for [getty(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=getty&section=8). Please see the [gettytab(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=gettytab&section=5) manual page for complete information on the format of the file and the list of capabilities.\r
-\r
-##### 17.4.4.1.1 Locked-speed Config \r
-\r
-If you are locking your modem's data communications rate at a particular speed, you probably will not need to make any changes to `/etc/gettytab`.\r
-\r
-##### 17.4.4.1.2 Matching-speed Config \r
-\r
-You will need to set up an entry in `/etc/gettytab` to give `getty` information about the speeds you wish to use for your modem. If you have a 2400 bps modem, you can probably use the existing `D2400` entry.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # Fast dialup terminals, 2400/1200/300 rotary (can start either way)\r
-    #\r
-    D2400|d2400|Fast-Dial-2400:\\r
-            :nx#D1200:tc2400-baud:\r
-    3|D1200|Fast-Dial-1200:\\r
-            :nx#D300:tc1200-baud:\r
-    5|D300|Fast-Dial-300:\\r
-            :nx#D2400:tc300-baud:\r
-\r
-\r
-If you have a higher speed modem, you will probably need to add an entry in `/etc/gettytab`; here is an entry you could use for a 14.4 Kbps modem with a top interface speed of 19.2 Kbps:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # Additions for a V.32bis Modem\r
-    #\r
-    um|V300|High Speed Modem at 300,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#V19200:tcstd.300:\r
-    un|V1200|High Speed Modem at 1200,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#V300:tcstd.1200:\r
-    uo|V2400|High Speed Modem at 2400,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#V1200:tcstd.2400:\r
-    up|V9600|High Speed Modem at 9600,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#V2400:tcstd.9600:\r
-    uq|V19200|High Speed Modem at 19200,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#V9600:tcstd.19200:\r
-\r
-\r
-This will result in 8-bit, no parity connections.\r
-\r
-The example above starts the communications rate at 19.2 Kbps (for a V.32bis connection), then cycles through 9600 bps (for V.32), 2400 bps, 1200 bps, 300 bps, and back to 19.2 Kbps. Communications rate cycling is implemented with the `nx#` (***next table***) capability. Each of the lines uses a `tc` (***table continuation***) entry to pick up the rest of the ***standard*** settings for a particular data rate.\r
-\r
-If you have a 28.8 Kbps modem and/or you want to take advantage of compression on a 14.4 Kbps modem, you need to use a higher communications rate than 19.2 Kbps. Here is an example of a `gettytab` entry starting a 57.6 Kbps:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    #\r
-    # Additions for a V.32bis or V.34 Modem\r
-    # Starting at 57.6 Kbps\r
-    #\r
-    vm|VH300|Very High Speed Modem at 300,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#VH57600:tcstd.300:\r
-    vn|VH1200|Very High Speed Modem at 1200,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#VH300:tcstd.1200:\r
-    vo|VH2400|Very High Speed Modem at 2400,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#VH1200:tcstd.2400:\r
-    vp|VH9600|Very High Speed Modem at 9600,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#VH2400:tcstd.9600:\r
-    vq|VH57600|Very High Speed Modem at 57600,8-bit:\\r
-            :nx#VH9600:tcstd.57600:\r
-\r
-\r
-If you have a slow CPU or a heavily loaded system and do not have 16550A-based serial ports, you may receive ***`sio`*** ***silo*** errors at 57.6 Kbps.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.4.2 `/etc/ttys` \r
-\r
-Configuration of the `/etc/ttys` file was covered in [ Example 17-1](term.html#EX-ETC-TTYS). Configuration for modems is similar but we must pass a different argument to `getty` and specify a different terminal type. The general format for both locked-speed and matching-speed configurations is:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ttyd0   "/usr/libexec/getty `***xxx***`"   dialup on\r
-\r
-\r
-The first item in the above line is the device special file for this entry -- `ttyd0` means `/dev/ttyd0` is the file that this `getty` will be watching. The second item, `"/usr/libexec/getty `***xxx***`"` (`***xxx***` will be replaced by the initial `gettytab` capability) is the process `init` will run on the device. The third item, `dialup`, is the default terminal type. The fourth parameter, `on`, indicates to `init` that the line is operational. There can be a fifth parameter, `secure`, but it should only be used for terminals which are physically secure (such as the system console).\r
-\r
-The default terminal type (`dialup` in the example above) may depend on local preferences. `dialup` is the traditional default terminal type on dial-up lines so that users may customize their login scripts to notice when the terminal is `dialup` and automatically adjust their terminal type. However, the author finds it easier at his site to specify `vt102` as the default terminal type, since the users just use VT102 emulation on their remote systems.\r
-\r
-After you have made changes to `/etc/ttys`, you may send the `init` process a HUP signal to re-read the file. You can use the command\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # kill -HUP 1\r
-\r
-\r
- to send the signal. If this is your first time setting up the system, you may want to wait until your modem(s) are properly configured and connected before signaling `init`.\r
-\r
-##### 17.4.4.2.1 Locked-speed Config \r
-\r
-For a locked-speed configuration, your `ttys` entry needs to have a fixed-speed entry provided to `getty`. For a modem whose port speed is locked at 19.2 Kbps, the `ttys` entry might look like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ttyd0   "/usr/libexec/getty std.19200"   dialup on\r
-\r
-\r
-If your modem is locked at a different data rate, substitute the appropriate value for `std.`***speed****** instead of `std.19200`. Make sure that you use a valid type listed in `/etc/gettytab`.\r
-\r
-##### 17.4.4.2.2 Matching-speed Config \r
-\r
-In a matching-speed configuration, your `ttys` entry needs to reference the appropriate beginning ***auto-baud*** (sic) entry in `/etc/gettytab`. For example, if you added the above suggested entry for a matching-speed modem that starts at 19.2 Kbps (the `gettytab` entry containing the `V19200` starting point), your `ttys` entry might look like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ttyd0   "/usr/libexec/getty V19200"   dialup on\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.4.3 `/etc/rc.serial` \r
-\r
-High-speed modems, like V.32, V.32bis, and V.34 modems, need to use hardware (`RTS/CTS`) flow control. You can add `stty` commands to `/etc/rc.serial` to set the hardware flow control flag in the DragonFly kernel for the modem ports.\r
-\r
-For example to set the `termios` flag `crtscts` on serial port #1's (`COM2`) dial-in and dial-out initialization devices, the following lines could be added to `/etc/rc.serial`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # Serial port initial configuration\r
-    stty -f /dev/ttyid1 crtscts\r
-    stty -f /dev/cuaia1 crtscts\r
-\r
-\r
-### 17.4.5 Modem Settings \r
-\r
-If you have a modem whose parameters may be permanently set in non-volatile RAM, you will need to use a terminal program (such as Telix under MS-DOS® or `tip` under DragonFly) to set the parameters. Connect to the modem using the same communications speed as the initial speed `getty` will use and configure the modem's non-volatile RAM to match these requirements:\r
-\r
-
-* CD asserted when connected\r
-
-* DTR asserted for operation; dropping DTR hangs up line and resets modem\r
-
-* CTS transmitted data flow control\r
-
-* Disable XON/XOFF flow control\r
-
-* RTS received data flow control\r
-
-* Quiet mode (no result codes)\r
-
-* No command echo\r
-\r
-Please read the documentation for your modem to find out what commands and/or DIP switch settings you need to give it.\r
-\r
-For example, to set the above parameters on a U.S. Robotics® Sportster® 14,400 external modem, one could give these commands to the modem:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ATZ\r
-    AT&amp;C1&amp;D2&amp;H1&amp;I0&amp;R2&amp;W\r
-\r
-\r
-You might also want to take this opportunity to adjust other settings in the modem, such as whether it will use V.42bis and/or MNP5 compression.\r
-\r
-The U.S. Robotics Sportster 14,400 external modem also has some DIP switches that need to be set; for other modems, perhaps you can use these settings as an example:\r
-\r
-
-* Switch 1: UP -- DTR Normal\r
-
-* Switch 2: N/A (Verbal Result Codes/Numeric Result Codes)\r
-
-* Switch 3: UP -- Suppress Result Codes\r
-
-* Switch 4: DOWN -- No echo, offline commands\r
-
-* Switch 5: UP -- Auto Answer\r
-
-* Switch 6: UP -- Carrier Detect Normal\r
-
-* Switch 7: UP -- Load NVRAM Defaults\r
-
-* Switch 8: N/A (Smart Mode/Dumb Mode)\r
-\r
-Result codes should be disabled/suppressed for dial-up modems to avoid problems that can occur if `getty` mistakenly gives a login: prompt to a modem that is in command mode and the modem echoes the command or returns a result code. This sequence can result in a extended, silly conversation between `getty` and the modem.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.5.1 Locked-speed Config \r
-\r
-For a locked-speed configuration, you will need to configure the modem to maintain a constant modem-to-computer data rate independent of the communications rate. On a U.S. Robotics Sportster 14,400 external modem, these commands will lock the modem-to-computer data rate at the speed used to issue the commands:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ATZ\r
-    AT&amp;B1&amp;W\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.5.2 Matching-speed Config \r
-\r
-For a variable-speed configuration, you will need to configure your modem to adjust its serial port data rate to match the incoming call rate. On a U.S. Robotics Sportster 14,400 external modem, these commands will lock the modem's error-corrected data rate to the speed used to issue the commands, but allow the serial port rate to vary for non-error-corrected connections:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ATZ\r
-    AT&amp;B2&amp;W\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.5.3 Checking the Modem's Configuration \r
-\r
-Most high-speed modems provide commands to view the modem's current operating parameters in a somewhat human-readable fashion. On the U.S. Robotics Sportster 14,400 external modems, the command `ATI5` displays the settings that are stored in the non-volatile RAM. To see the true operating parameters of the modem (as influenced by the modem's DIP switch settings), use the commands `ATZ` and then `ATI4`.\r
-\r
-If you have a different brand of modem, check your modem's manual to see how to double-check your modem's configuration parameters.\r
-\r
-### 17.4.6 Troubleshooting \r
-\r
-Here are a few steps you can follow to check out the dial-up modem on your system.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.6.1 Checking Out the DragonFly System \r
-\r
-Hook up your modem to your DragonFly system, boot the system, and, if your modem has status indication lights, watch to see whether the modem's DTR indicator lights when the login: prompt appears on the system's console -- if it lights up, that should mean that DragonFly has started a `getty` process on the appropriate communications port and is waiting for the modem to accept a call.\r
-\r
-If the DTR indicator does not light, login to the DragonFly system through the console and issue a `ps ax` to see if DragonFly is trying to run a `getty` process on the correct port. You should see lines like these among the processes displayed:\r
-\r
-    \r
-      114 ??  I      0:00.10 /usr/libexec/getty V19200 ttyd0\r
-      115 ??  I      0:00.10 /usr/libexec/getty V19200 ttyd1\r
-\r
-\r
-If you see something different, like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-      114 d0  I      0:00.10 /usr/libexec/getty V19200 ttyd0\r
-\r
-\r
-and the modem has not accepted a call yet, this means that `getty` has completed its open on the communications port. This could indicate a problem with the cabling or a mis-configured modem, because `getty` should not be able to open the communications port until CD (carrier detect) has been asserted by the modem.\r
-\r
-If you do not see any `getty` processes waiting to open the desired `ttyd`***N****** port, double-check your entries in `/etc/ttys` to see if there are any mistakes there. Also, check the log file `/var/log/messages` to see if there are any log messages from `init` or `getty` regarding any problems. If there are any messages, triple-check the configuration files `/etc/ttys` and `/etc/gettytab`, as well as the appropriate device special files `/dev/ttydN`, for any mistakes, missing entries, or missing device special files.\r
-\r
-#### 17.4.6.2 Try Dialing In \r
-\r
-Try dialing into the system; be sure to use 8 bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit on the remote system. If you do not get a prompt right away, or get garbage, try pressing Enter about once per second. If you still do not see a login: prompt after a while, try sending a `BREAK`. If you are using a high-speed modem to do the dialing, try dialing again after locking the dialing modem's interface speed (via `AT&amp;B1` on a U.S. Robotics Sportster modem, for example).\r
-\r
-If you still cannot get a login: prompt, check `/etc/gettytab` again and double-check that\r
-\r
-
-* The initial capability name specified in `/etc/ttys` for the line matches a name of a capability in `/etc/gettytab`\r
-
-* Each `nx=` entry matches another `gettytab` capability name\r
-
-* Each `tc=` entry matches another `gettytab` capability name\r
-\r
-If you dial but the modem on the DragonFly system will not answer, make sure that the modem is configured to answer the phone when DTR is asserted. If the modem seems to be configured correctly, verify that the DTR line is asserted by checking the modem's indicator lights (if it has any).\r
-\r
-If you have gone over everything several times and it still does not work, take a break and come back to it later. If it still does not work, perhaps you can send an electronic mail message to the [DragonFly User related mailing list](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) describing your modem and your problem, and the good folks on the list will try to help.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-serial\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-adding.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-adding.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e157cb4..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,122 +0,0 @@
-
-
-## 12.3 Adding Disks 
-
-
-
-***Originally contributed by David O'Brien.***
-
-
-
-Lets say we want to add a new SCSI disk to a machine that currently only has a single drive. First turn off the computer and install the drive in the computer following the instructions of the computer, controller, and drive manufacturer. Due to the wide variations of procedures to do this, the details are beyond the scope of this document.
-
-
-
-Login as user `root`. After you have installed the drive, inspect `/var/run/dmesg.boot` to ensure the new disk was found. Continuing with our example, the newly added drive will be `da1` and we want to mount it on `/1` (if you are adding an IDE drive, the device name will be `ad1`).
-
-
-
-Because DragonFly runs on IBM-PC compatible computers, it must take into account the PC BIOS partitions. These are different from the traditional BSD partitions. A PC disk has up to four BIOS partition entries. If the disk is going to be truly dedicated to DragonFly, you can use the ***dedicated*** mode. Otherwise, DragonFly will have to live within one of the PC BIOS partitions. DragonFly calls the PC BIOS partitions ***slices*** so as not to confuse them with traditional BSD partitions. You may also use slices on a disk that is dedicated to DragonFly, but used in a computer that also has another operating system installed. This is to not confuse the `fdisk` utility of the other operating system.
-
-
-
-In the slice case the drive will be added as `/dev/da1s1e`. This is read as: SCSI disk, unit number 1 (second SCSI disk), slice 1 (PC BIOS partition 1), and `e` BSD partition. In the dedicated case, the drive will be added simply as `/dev/da1s0e`.
-
-
-
-### 12.3.1 Using Command Line Utilities 
-
-
-
-#### 12.3.1.1 Using Slices 
-
-
-
-This setup will allow your disk to work correctly with other operating systems that might be installed on your computer and will not confuse other operating systems' `fdisk` utilities. It is recommended to use this method for new disk installs. Only use `dedicated` mode if you have a good reason to do so!
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/da1 bs=1k count=1
-
-    # fdisk -BI da1                    # Initialize your new disk
-
-    # disklabel -B -w -r da1s1 auto    # Label it.
-
-    # disklabel -e da1s1               # Edit the disklabel just created and add any partitions
-
-    # mkdir -p /1
-
-    # newfs /dev/da1s1e                # Repeat this for every partition you created
-
-    # mount /dev/da1s1e /1             # Mount the partition(s)
-
-    # vi /etc/fstab                    # Add the appropriate entry/entries to your `/etc/fstab`
-
-
-
-
-
-If you have an IDE disk, substitute `ad` for `da`.
-
-
-
-#### 12.3.1.2 Dedicated 
-
-
-
-If you will not be sharing the new drive with another operating system, you may use the `dedicated` mode. Remember this mode can confuse Microsoft operating systems; however, no damage will be done by them. IBM's OS/2® however, will "appropriate" any partition it finds which it does not understand.
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/da1 bs=1k count=1
-
-    # disklabel -Brw da1s0 auto
-
-    # disklabel -e da1s0               # Create the `e' partition
-
-    # newfs -d0 /dev/da1s0e
-
-    # mkdir -p /1
-
-    # vi /etc/fstab                    # Add an entry for /dev/da1s0e
-
-    # mount /1
-
-
-
-
-
-An alternate method is:
-
-
-
-    
-
-    # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/da1 count=2
-
-    # disklabel /dev/da1s0 | disklabel -BrR da1s0 /dev/stdin
-
-    # newfs /dev/da1s0e
-
-    # mkdir -p /1
-
-    # vi /etc/fstab                    # add an entry for /dev/da1s0e
-
-    # mount /1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-CategoryHandbook
-
-CategoryHandbook-storage
-
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-naming.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-naming.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 1cb04a9..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,25 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.2 Device Names \r
-\r
-The following is a list of physical storage devices supported in DragonFly, and the device names associated with them.\r
-\r
- **Table 12-1. Physical Disk Naming Conventions** \r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Drive type | Drive device name 
- IDE hard drives | `ad` 
- IDE CDROM drives | `acd` 
- SCSI hard drives and USB Mass storage devices | `da` 
- SCSI CDROM drives | `cd` 
- Assorted non-standard CDROM drives | `mcd` for Mitsumi CD-ROM, `scd` for Sony CD-ROM, 
- Floppy drives | `fd` 
- SCSI tape drives | `sa` 
- IDE tape drives | `ast` 
- Flash drives | `fla` for DiskOnChip® Flash device 
- RAID drives | `aacd` for Adaptec® AdvancedRAID, `mlxd` and `mlyd` for Mylex®, `amrd` for AMI MegaRAID®, `idad` for Compaq Smart RAID, `twed` for 3ware® RAID. |\r
-"""]]\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-virtual.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-virtual.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e2cb27a..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,93 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.11 Network, Memory, and File-Backed File Systems \r
-\r
-***Reorganized and enhanced by Marc Fonvieille. ***\r
-\r
-Aside from the disks you physically insert into your computer: floppies, CDs, hard drives, and so forth; other forms of disks are understood by DragonFly - the ***virtual disks***.\r
-\r
-These include network file systems such as the [network-nfs.html Network File System], memory-based file systems and file-backed file systems.\r
-\r
-### 12.11.1 File-Backed File System \r
-\r
-The utility [vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vnconfig&section8) configures and enables vnode pseudo-disk devices. A ***vnode*** is a representation of a file, and is the focus of file activity. This means that [vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=vnconfig&section=8) uses files to create and operate a file system. One possible use is the mounting of floppy or CD images kept in files.\r
-\r
-To use [vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vnconfig&section8), you need [vn(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=vn&section=4) support in your kernel configuration file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    pseudo-device vn\r
-\r
-\r
-To mount an existing file system image:\r
-\r
- **Example 12-4. Using vnconfig to Mount an Existing File System Image** \r
-\r
-    \r
-    # vnconfig vn`***0***` `***diskimage***`\r
-    # mount /dev/vn`***0***`c `***/mnt***`\r
-\r
-\r
-To create a new file system image with [vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vnconfig&section8):\r
-\r
- **Example 12-5. Creating a New File-Backed Disk with `vnconfig`** \r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dd if#/dev/zero of`***newimage***` bs=1k count=`***5***`k\r
-    5120+0 records in\r
-    5120+0 records out\r
-    # vnconfig -s labels -c vn`***0***` `***newimage***`\r
-    # disklabel -r -w vn`***0***` auto\r
-    # newfs vn`***0***`c\r
-    Warning: 2048 sector(s) in last cylinder unallocated\r
-    /dev/vn0c:     10240 sectors in 3 cylinders of 1 tracks, 4096 sectors\r
-            5.0MB in 1 cyl groups (16 c/g, 32.00MB/g, 1280 i/g)\r
-    super-block backups (for fsck -b #) at:\r
-     32\r
-    # mount /dev/vn`***0***`c `***/mnt***`\r
-    # df `***/mnt***`\r
-    Filesystem  1K-blocks     Used    Avail Capacity  Mounted on\r
-    /dev/vn0c        4927        1     4532     0%    /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.11.2 Memory-Based File System \r
-\r
-The [md(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#md&section4) driver is a simple, efficient means to create memory file systems. [malloc(9)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=malloc&section=9) is used to allocate the memory.\r
-\r
-Simply take a file system you have prepared with, for example, [vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vnconfig&section8), and:\r
-\r
- **Example 12-6. md Memory Disk** \r
-\r
-    \r
-    # dd if#`***newimage***` of/dev/md`***0***`\r
-    5120+0 records in\r
-    5120+0 records out\r
-    # mount /dev/md`***0c***` `***/mnt***`\r
-    # df `***/mnt***`\r
-    Filesystem  1K-blocks     Used    Avail Capacity  Mounted on\r
-    /dev/md0c        4927        1     4532     0%    /mnt\r
-\r
-\r
-For more details, please refer to [md(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#md&section4) manual page.\r
-\r
-### 12.11.3 Detaching a Memory Disk from the System \r
-\r
-When a memory-based or file-based file system is not used, you should release all resources to the system. The first thing to do is to unmount the file system, then use [mdconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mdconfig&section8) to detach the disk from the system and release the resources.\r
-\r
-For example to detach and free all resources used by `/dev/md4`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mdconfig -d -u `***4***`\r
-\r
-\r
-It is possible to list information about configured [md(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#md&section4) devices in using the command `mdconfig -l`.\r
-\r
-[vnconfig(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vnconfig&section8) is used to detach the device. For example to detach and free all resources used by `/dev/vn4`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # vnconfig -u vn`***4***`\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-disks.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-disks.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 78cc8e9..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,94 +0,0 @@
-## Chapter 12 Storage
-
- **Table of Contents** 
-
-
-* 12.1 [Synopsis](/docs/handbook/handbook-disks)
-
-
-* 12.2 [Device Names](/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-naming)
-
-
-* 12.3 [Adding Disks](/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-adding)
-
-
-* 12.4 [RAID](/docs/handbook/handbook-raid)
-
-
-* 12.5 [Creating and Using Optical Media (CDs)](/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-cds)
-
-
-* 12.6 [Creating and Using Optical Media (DVDs)](/docs/handbook/handbook-creating-dvds)
-
-
-* 12.7 [Creating and Using Floppy Disks](/docs/handbook/handbook-floppies)
-
-
-* 12.8 [Creating and Using Data Tapes](/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-tapebackups)
-
-
-* 12.9 [Backups to Floppies](/docs/handbook/handbook-backups-floppybackups)
-
-
-* 12.10 [Backup Basics](/docs/handbook/handbook-backup-basics)
-
-
-* 12.11 [Network, Memory, and File-Backed File Systems](/docs/handbook/handbook-disks-virtual)
-
-
-* 12.12 [File System Quotas](/docs/handbook/handbook-quotas.html)
-
-
-
-## 12.1 Synopsis 
-
-
-
-This chapter covers the use of disks in DragonFly. This includes memory-backed disks, network-attached disks, and standard SCSI/IDE storage devices.
-
-
-
-After reading this chapter, you will know:
-
-
-
-
-* The terminology DragonFly uses to describe the organization of data on a physical disk (partitions and slices).
-
-
-* How to add additional hard disks to your system.
-
-
-* How to set up virtual file systems, such as memory disks.
-
-
-* How to use quotas to limit disk space usage.
-
-
-* How to encrypt disks to secure them against attackers.
-
-
-* How to create and burn CDs and DVDs on DragonFly.
-
-
-* The various storage media options for backups.
-
-
-* How to use backup programs available under DragonFly.
-
-
-* How to backup to floppy disks.
-
-
-* What snapshots are and how to use them efficiently.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-CategoryHandbook
-
-Category
-
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-news.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-news.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 542b755..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,71 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## C.2 Usenet Newsgroups \r
-\r
-All the DragonFly mailing lists are duplicated as newsgroups, served at nntp.dragonflybsd.org.\r
-\r
-In addition to these newsgroups, there are many others in which DragonFly is discussed or are otherwise relevant to DragonFly users. [Keyword searchable archives](http://minnie.tuhs.org/BSD-info/bsdnews_search.html) are available for some of these newsgroups from courtesy of Warren Toomey `&lt;[mailto:wkt@cs.adfa.edu.au wkt@cs.adfa.edu.au]&gt;`.\r
-\r
-### C.2.1 BSD Specific Newsgroups \r
-\r
-
-* [comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.announce](news:comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.announce)\r
-
-* [de.comp.os.unix.bsd](news:de.comp.os.unix.bsd) (German)\r
-
-* [fr.comp.os.bsd](news:fr.comp.os.bsd) (French)\r
-
-* [it.comp.os.freebsd](news:it.comp.os.freebsd) (Italian)\r
-\r
-### C.2.2 Other UNIX® Newsgroups of Interest \r
-\r
-
-* [comp.unix](news:comp.unix)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.questions](news:comp.unix.questions)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.admin](news:comp.unix.admin)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.programmer](news:comp.unix.programmer)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.shell](news:comp.unix.shell)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.user-friendly](news:comp.unix.user-friendly)\r
-
-* [comp.security.unix](news:comp.security.unix)\r
-
-* [comp.sources.unix](news:comp.sources.unix)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.advocacy](news:comp.unix.advocacy)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.misc](news:comp.unix.misc)\r
-
-* [comp.bugs.4bsd](news:comp.bugs.4bsd)\r
-
-* [comp.bugs.4bsd.ucb-fixes](news:comp.bugs.4bsd.ucb-fixes)\r
-
-* [comp.unix.bsd](news:comp.unix.bsd)\r
-\r
-### C.2.3 X Window System \r
-\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.i386unix](news:comp.windows.x.i386unix)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x](news:comp.windows.x)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.apps](news:comp.windows.x.apps)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.announce](news:comp.windows.x.announce)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.intrinsics](news:comp.windows.x.intrinsics)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.motif](news:comp.windows.x.motif)\r
-
-* [comp.windows.x.pex](news:comp.windows.x.pex)\r
-
-* [comp.emulators.ms-windows.wine](news:comp.emulators.ms-windows.wine)\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-netresources\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-web.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources-web.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3881a30..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,13 +0,0 @@
-## World Wide Web Servers \r
-\r
-(as of 2008/01/07 23:37:47 UTC)\r
-\r
-
-* Central Servers\r
-
-* http://www.DragonFlyBSD.org/\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-netresources\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-eresources.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d9b53f4..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,93 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Appendix Resources on the Internet \r
-\r
-\r
-The rapid pace of DragonFly progress makes print media impractical as a means of following the latest developments. Electronic resources are the best, if not often the only, way stay informed of the latest advances. Since DragonFly is a volunteer effort, the user community itself also generally serves as a ***technical support department*** of sorts, with electronic mail and USENET news being the most effective way of reaching that community.\r
-\r
-The most important points of contact with the DragonFly user community are outlined below. If you are aware of other resources not mentioned here, please send them to the [DragonFly Documentation project mailing list](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) so that they may also be included.\r
-\r
-## Mailing Lists \r
-\r
-Though many of the DragonFly development members read USENET, we cannot always guarantee that we will get to your questions in a timely fashion (or at all) if you post them only to one of the `comp.unix.bsd.*` groups. By addressing your questions to the appropriate mailing list you will reach both us and a concentrated DragonFly audience, invariably assuring a better (or at least faster) response.\r
-\r
-The charters for the various lists are given at the bottom of this document. ***Please read the charter before joining or sending mail to any list***. Most of our list subscribers now receive many hundreds of DragonFly related messages every day, and by setting down charters and rules for proper use we are striving to keep the signal-to-noise ratio of the lists high. To do less would see the mailing lists ultimately fail as an effective communications medium for the project.\r
-\r
-Archives are kept for all of the mailing lists and can be searched using the [mail archives](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/). The keyword searchable archive offers an excellent way of finding answers to frequently asked questions and should be consulted before posting a question.\r
-\r
-### List Summary \r
-\r
-***General lists:*** The following are general lists which anyone is free (and encouraged) to join:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| List | Purpose 
- [bugs](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | Bug reports 
- [commits](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | Messages generated by code changes to DragonFly source, documentation, or the website. 
- [docs](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | Discussion of DragonFly documentation 
- [kernel](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | Ostensibly for discussion of kernel work, though this list also serves as a catch-all for any topic pertaining to DragonFly. 
- [submit](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | Submission and discussion of new code or ideas for DragonFly. 
- [Test](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | For testing your newsreader or mail software. 
- [users](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/mailarchive/) | User related discussion about DragonFly. |\r
-"""]]\r
-### How to Subscribe \r
-\r
-To subscribe to a list, click on the list name above or send an email to &lt;`listname`-request@dragonflybsd.org&gt; and put 'subscribe' in the body of the message.\r
-\r
-To actually post to a given list you simply send mail to &lt;`listname`@dragonflybsd.org&gt;. It will then be redistributed to mailing list members world-wide.\r
-\r
-To unsubscribe yourself from a list, email &lt;`listname`-request@dragonflybsd.org&gt; and put 'unsubscribe' in the body of the message.\r
-\r
-### List Charters \r
-\r
-***All*** DragonFly mailing lists have certain basic rules which must be adhered to by anyone using them. Failure to comply with these guidelines may result in from all DragonFly mailing lists and filtered from further posting to them. We regret that such rules and measures are necessary at all, but today's Internet is a pretty harsh environment, it would seem, and many fail to appreciate just how fragile some of its mechanisms are.\r
-\r
-Rules of the road:\r
-\r
-
-* The topic of any posting should adhere to the basic charter of the list it is posted to, e.g. if the list is about technical issues then your posting should contain technical discussion. Ongoing irrelevant chatter or flaming only detracts from the value of the mailing list for everyone on it and will not be tolerated.\r
-
-* No posting should be made to more than two mailing lists, and only to two when a clear and obvious need to post to both lists exists. For most lists, there is already a great deal of subscriber overlap. If a message is sent to you in such a way that multiple mailing lists appear on the `Cc` line then the `Cc` line should also be trimmed before sending it out again. ***You are still responsible for your own cross-postings, no matter who the originator might have been.***\r
-
-* Personal attacks and profanity (in the context of an argument) are not allowed, and that includes users and developers alike. Gross breaches of netiquette, like excerpting or reposting private mail when permission to do so was not and would not be forthcoming, are frowned upon but not specifically enforced. ***However***, there are also very few cases where such content would fit within the charter of a list and it would therefore probably rate a warning (or ban) on that basis alone.\r
-
-* Advertising of non-DragonFly related products or services is strictly prohibited and will result in an immediate ban if it is clear that the offender is advertising by spam.\r
-\r
-### C.1.4 Filtering on the Mailing Lists \r
-\r
-The DragonFly mailing lists are filtered in multiple ways to avoid the distribution of spam, viruses, and other unwanted emails. The filtering actions described in this section do not include all those used to protect the mailing lists.\r
-\r
-Only certain types of attachments are allowed on the mailing lists. All attachments with a MIME content type not found in the list below will be stripped before an email is distributed on the mailing lists.\r
-\r
-
-* application/octet-stream\r
-
-* application/pdf\r
-
-* application/pgp-signature\r
-
-* application/x-pkcs7-signature\r
-
-* message/rfc822\r
-
-* multipart/alternative\r
-
-* multipart/related\r
-
-* multipart/signed\r
-
-* text/html\r
-
-* text/plain\r
-
-* text/x-diff\r
-
-* text/x-patch\r
-\r
- **Note:** Some of the mailing lists might allow attachments of other MIME content types, but the above list should be applicable for most of the mailing lists.\r
-\r
-If an email contains both an HTML and a plain text version, the HTML version will be removed. If an email contains only an HTML version, it will be converted to plain text.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-floppies.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-floppies.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c208379..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,72 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 12.7 Creating and Using Floppy Disks \r
-\r
-***Original work by Julio Merino. ******Rewritten by Martin Karlsson. ***\r
-\r
-Storing data on floppy disks is sometimes useful, for example when one does not have any other removable storage media or when one needs to transfer small amounts of data to another computer.\r
-\r
-This section will explain how to use floppy disks in DragonFly. It will primarily cover formatting and usage of 3.5inch DOS floppies, but the concepts are similar for other floppy disk formats.\r
-\r
-### 12.7.1 Formatting Floppies \r
-\r
-#### 12.7.1.1 The Device \r
-\r
-Floppy disks are accessed through entries in `/dev`, just like other devices. To access the raw floppy disk, one uses `/dev/fd`***N******, where `***N***` stands for the drive number, usually 0, or `/dev/fd`***NX******, where `***X***` stands for a letter.\r
-\r
-There are also `/dev/fd`***N***`.`***size****** devices, where `***size***` is a floppy disk size in kilobytes. These entries are used at low-level format time to determine the disk size. 1440kB is the size that will be used in the following examples.\r
-\r
-Sometimes the entries under `/dev` will have to be (re)created. To do that, issue:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /dev &amp;&amp; ./MAKEDEV "fd*"\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 12.7.1.2 Formatting \r
-\r
-A floppy disk needs to be low-level formated before it can be used. This is usually done by the vendor, but formatting is a good way to check media integrity. Although it is possible to force larger (or smaller) disk sizes, 1440kB is what most floppy disks are designed for.\r
-\r
-To low-level format the floppy disk you need to use [fdformat(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#fdformat&section1). This utility expects the device name as an argument.\r
-\r
-Make note of any error messages, as these can help determine if the disk is good or bad.\r
-\r
-Use the `/dev/fd`***N***`.`***size****** devices to format the floppy. Insert a new 3.5inch floppy disk in your drive and issue:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /usr/sbin/fdformat /dev/fd0.1440\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.7.2 The Disk Label \r
-\r
-After low-level formatting the disk, you will need to place a disk label on it. This disk label will be destroyed later, but it is needed by the system to determine the size of the disk and its geometry later.\r
-\r
-The new disk label will take over the whole disk, and will contain all the proper information about the geometry of the floppy. The geometry values for the disk label are listed in `/etc/disktab`.\r
-\r
-You can run now [disklabel(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#disklabel&section8) like so:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /sbin/disklabel -B -r -w /dev/fd0 fd1440\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.7.3 The File System \r
-\r
-Now the floppy is ready to be high-level formated. This will place a new file system on it, which will let DragonFly read and write to the disk. After creating the new file system, the disk label is destroyed, so if you want to reformat the disk, you will have to recreate the disk label.\r
-\r
-The floppy's file system can be either UFS or FAT. FAT is generally a better choice for floppies.\r
-\r
-To put a new file system on the floppy, issue:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /sbin/newfs_msdos /dev/fd0\r
-\r
-\r
-The disk is now ready for use.\r
-\r
-### 12.7.4 Using the Floppy \r
-\r
-To use the floppy, mount it with [mount_msdos(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount_msdos&section8). One can also use [`sysutils/mtools`](http://pkgsrc.se/sysutils/mtools) from pkgsrc®.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-storage\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-disk.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-disk.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a7f89f3..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,83 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 2.3 CD Installation - Disk setup \r
-\r
-### 2.3.1 Disk formatting \r
-\r
-The slice layout on the newly formatted disk or partition needs to be set up, using this command.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # fdisk -u\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-If there are multiple operating systems on the disk, pick the correct partition judging by what partitions were created earlier with a resizing tool.\r
-\r
-### 2.3.2 Boot block installation \r
-\r
-The 'ad0' here refers to the first disk on the first IDE bus of a computer. Increment the number if the target disk is farther down the chain. For example, the master disk on the second IDE controller would be 'ad2'.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # boot0cfg -B `***ad0***`\r
-              # boot0cfg -v `***ad0***`\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
--s SLICE, where SLICE is a number, controls which slice on disk is used by boot0cfg to start from. By default, this number is 1, and will only need modification if a different slice contains DragonFly.\r
-\r
-Use -o packet as an option to boot0cfg if the DragonFly partition is located beyond cylinder 1023 on the disk. This location problem usually only happens when another operating system is taking up more than the first 8 gigabytes of disk space. This problem cannot happen if DragonFly is installed to a dedicated disk\r
-\r
-### 2.3.3 Disklabel \r
-\r
-If DragonFly is installed anywhere but the first partition of the disk, the device entry for that partition will have to be created. Otherwise, the device entry is automatically created. Refer to this different partition instead of the 'ad0s1a' used in later examples.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # cd /dev; ./MAKEDEV `***ad0s2***`\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-The partition needs to be created on the DragonFly disk.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # disklabel -B -r -w `***ad0s1***` auto\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-Using /etc/disklabel.ad0s1 as an example, issue the following command to edit the disklabel for the just-created partition.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # disklabel -e `***ad0s1***`\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Partition | Size | Mountpoint 
- ad0s2a | 256m | / 
- ad0s2b | 1024m | swap 
- ad0s2c | leave alone | This represents the whole slice. 
- ad0s2d | 256m | /var 
- ad0s2e | 256m | /tmp ! 
- ad0s2f | 8192m | /usr - This should be at least 4096m 
- ad0s2g | * | /home - This holds 'everything else' |\r
-"""]]\r
-### 2.3.4 Partition Format \r
-\r
-newfs will format each individual partition.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              # newfs /dev/`***ad0s1a***`\r
-              # newfs -U /dev/`***ad0s1d***`\r
-              # newfs -U /dev/`***ad0s1e***`\r
-              # newfs -U /dev/`***ad0s1f***`\r
-              # newfs -U /dev/`***ad0s1g***`\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** The -U option is not used for the root partition, since / is usually relatively small. Softupdates can cause it to run out of space while under a lot of disk activity, such as a buildworld.\r
-\r
- **Note:** The command listing skips directly from ad0s1a to ad0s1d. This is because /dev/ad0s1b is used as swap and does not require formatting; ad0s1c refers to the entire disk and should not be formatted.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-installation\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-postinstall.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-postinstall.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e3b4163..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,76 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 2.5 CD Installation - Post-install cleanup \r
-\r
-/tmp and /var/tmp are both often used as temporary directories. Since use is not consistent from application to application, it is worthwhile to create /tmp as a link to /var/tmp so space is not wasted in duplication.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # chmod 1777 /mnt/tmp\r
-          # rm -fr /mnt/var/tmp\r
-          # ln -s /tmp /mnt/var/tmp\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** /tmp will not work until the computer is rebooted.\r
-\r
-The file /etc/fstab describes the disk partition layout. However, the version copied to the target disk only reflects the Live CD layout. The installed /mnt/fstab.example can be used as a starting point for creating a new /etc/fstab.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # vi /mnt/etc/fstab.example\r
-          # mv /mnt/etc/fstab.example /mnt/etc/fstab\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-A corrupted disklabel will render a disk useless. While this is thankfully very rare, having a backup of the new install's disklabel may stave off disaster at some point in the future. This is optional. (Adjust the slice name to reflect the actual installation.)\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # disklabel `***ad0s1***` &gt; /mnt/etc/disklabel.backup\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** Nothing is copied to the /tmp directory that was created in the previous step. This is not an error, since /tmp is intended only for temporary storage.\r
-\r
-Remove some unnecessary files copied over from the Live CD.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # rm /mnt/boot/loader.conf\r
-          # rm /mnt/boot.catalog\r
-          # rm -r /mnt/rr_moved\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-The system can now be rebooted. Be sure to remove the Live CD from the CDROM drive so that the computer can boot from the newly-installed disk.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # reboot\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** Use the reboot command so that the disk can be unmounted cleanly. Hitting the power or reset buttons, while it won't hurt the Live CD, can leave the mounted disk in a inconsistent state.\r
-\r
-If the system refuses to boot, there are several options to try:\r
-\r
-
-* Old bootblocks can interfere with the initialization-process. To avoid this, zero-out the MBR. "of" should be changed to the correct disk entry if ad0 is not the targeted installation disk.\r
-      \r
-                # dd if#/dev/zero of/dev/`***ad0***` bs=32 count=16\r
-  \r
-
-* It is possible that the DragonFly slice is beyond cylinder 1023 on the hard disk, and can't be detected. Packet mode can fix this problem.\r
-      \r
-                # boot0cfg -o packet `***ad0***`\r
-  \r
-
-* If you can select CHS or LBA mode in your BIOS, try changing the mode to LBA.\r
-\r
-After a successful boot from the newly installed hard drive, the timezone should be set. Use the command `tzsetup` to set the appropriate time zone.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # tzsetup\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-installation\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-preinstall.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-preinstall.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4703d5c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,45 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 2.2 CD Installation - Making room \r
-\r
-### 2.2.1 DragonFly as the only operating system \r
-\r
-If DragonFly is to be the only operating system on the target computer, preparing the disk is a short and simple process. Boot with the live CD, and log in as root to reach a command prompt.\r
-\r
-First, the master boot record (MBR) must be cleared of any old information. This command clears all old data off your disk by writing zeros (if#/dev/zero) onto the system's master ata drive (of/dev/ad0).\r
-\r
-    \r
-            # dd if#/dev/zero of/dev/`***ad0***` bs=32k count=16\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-The now-empty disk must be formatted.\r
-\r
- **Important:** This will destroy any existing data on a disk. Do this only if you plan to dedicate this disk to DragonFly.\r
-\r
-    \r
-            # fdisk -I `***ad0***`\r
-            # fdisk -B `***ad0***`\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-### 2.2.2 Multiple operating systems on one hard disk \r
-\r
-This example assumes that the target computer for installation has at least one operating system installed that needs to survive the installation process. A new partition for DragonFly needs to be created from the existing partition(s) that otherwise fill the disk. There must be unused space within the existing partition in order to resize it.\r
-\r
- **Important:** The new partition is created from empty space in an existing partition. For example, an 18 gigabyte disk that has 17 gigabytes of existing data in the existing partition will only have 1 gigabyte available for the new partition.\r
-\r
-Partition resizing needs to be accomplished with a third-party tool. Commercial programs such as [Partition Magic](http://www.symantec.com/partitionmagic/) can accomplish these tasks. Free tools exist that can be adapted to this task, such as 'GNU parted', found on the [Knoppix CD](http://www.knopper.net/knoppix-mirrors/index-en.html), or [PAUD](http://paud.sourceforge.net).\r
-\r
-Create a new partition of at least 5-6 gigabytes. It is possible to install within a smaller amount of disk space, but this will create problems not covered by this document. The newly created partition does not need to be formatted; the rest of the installation process treats that new partiton as a new disk.\r
-\r
-### 2.2.3 Multiple operating systems, multiple hard disks \r
-\r
-Installing DragonFly to a separate disk removes the need for partition resizing, and is generally safer when trying to preserve an existing operating system installation.\r
-\r
-This type of installation is very similar to installing DragonFly as the only operating system. The only difference is the disk named in each command.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-installation\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-to-disk.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-install-cd-to-disk.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e078338..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,38 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 2.4 Installing to Disk from CD \r
-\r
-Since the Live CD contains all needed data to create a running DragonFly system, the simplest installation possible is to copy the Live CD data to the newly formatted disk/partition created in previous steps.\r
-\r
-These commands mount the newly created disk space and create the appropriate directories on it.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # mount /dev/`***ad0s1a***` /mnt\r
-          # mkdir /mnt/var\r
-          # mkdir /mnt/tmp\r
-          # mkdir /mnt/usr\r
-          # mkdir /mnt/home\r
-          # mount /dev/`***ad0s1d***` /mnt/var\r
-          # mount /dev/`***ad0s1e***` /mnt/tmp\r
-          # mount /dev/`***ad0s1f***` /mnt/usr\r
-          # mount /dev/`***ad0s1g***` /mnt/home\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-cpdup duplicates data from one volume to another. These commands copy data from the Live CD to the newly created directories on the mounted disk. Each step can take some time, depending on disk speed.\r
-\r
-    \r
-          # cpdup / /mnt\r
-          # cpdup /var /mnt/var\r
-          # cpdup /etc /mnt/etc\r
-          # cpdup /dev /mnt/dev\r
-          # cpdup /usr /mnt/usr\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** Nothing is copied to the /tmp directory that was created in the previous step. This is not an error, since /tmp is intended only for temporary storage.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-installation\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-install.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-install.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 498c65e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,37 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 2 Installation from CD \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 2.1 [ CD Installation Overview](install.html#INSTALL-CD-SYNOPSIS)\r
-
-* 2.2 [ CD Installation - Making room](install-cd-preinstall.html)\r
-
-* 2.3 [ CD Installation - Disk setup](install-cd-disk.html)\r
-
-* 2.4 [ Installing to Disk from CD](install-cd-to-disk.html)\r
-
-* 2.5 [ CD Installation - Post-install cleanup](install-cd-postinstall.html)\r
-
-* 2.6 [ CD Installation - New system setup](installation-system-setup.html)\r
-***Written by Markus Schatzl and Justin Sherrill. ***\r
-\r
-## 2.1 CD Installation Overview \r
-\r
-This document describes the installation of DragonFly BSD on a plain i386 machine. This process uses a bootable DragonFly CD, usually referred to as a 'live CD'.  This CD is available at one of the current mirrors, which distribute the images by various protocols. The authorative list can be found at the [DragonFly website](http://www.dragonflybsd.org/main/download.cgi).\r
-\r
-This document may be superseded by the /README file located on the live CD, which may reflect changes made after this document was last updated. Check that README for any last-minute changes and for an abbreviated version of this installation process.\r
-\r
-The DragonFly development team is working on an automatic installation tool, which simplifies the partitioning and installation processes. Until this tool is in place, the manual process here is required. Some experience with BSD-style tools is recommended.\r
-\r
- **Caution:** While this guide covers installing to a computer with an existing non-DragonFly operating system, take no chances! Back up any data on your disk drives that you want to save.\r
-\r
-When installing to an old machine, it may not be possible to boot from a CD. Use a bootmanager on a floppy in those cases, such as [Smart Bootmanager](http://btmgr.sourceforge.net/).\r
-\r
- **Caution:** Always be sure of the target disk for any command. Unless otherwise specified, each command here assumes the first disk in the IDE chain is the target. (ad0) Adjust commands as needed.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-installation-system-setup.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-installation-system-setup.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 9d4144c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,69 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 2.6 CD Installation - New system setup \r
-\r
-Once the new DragonFly system is booting from disk, there are a number of steps that may be useful before working further. The file /etc/rc.conf controls a number of options for booting the system.\r
-\r
-### 2.6.1 Setting up rc.conf \r
-\r
-Depending on location, a different keyboard map may be needed. This is only necessary for computers outside of North America.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    \r
-              # kbdmap\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-Pick the appropriate keyboard map and remember the name. Place this name in /etc/rc.conf. For example:\r
-\r
-    \r
-              keymap="german.iso.kbd"\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-The file /etc/rc.conf matches the one on the Live CD. Since it is now on an installed system are no longer running in a read-only environment, some changes should be made. Changes to this file will take effect after the next boot of the machine.\r
-\r
-These lines can be removed.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    syslogd_enable="NO"\r
-    xntpd_enable="NO"\r
-    cron_enable="NO"\r
-\r
-\r
-For a system which uses USB, this line will need to be modified to a value of "YES":\r
-\r
-    \r
-    usbd_enable="NO"\r
-\r
-\r
-inetd controls various small servers like telnet or ftp. By default, all servers are off, and must be individually uncommented in /etc/inetd.conf to start them. This is optional.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    inetd_enable="YES"              # Run the network daemon dispatcher (YES/NO).\r
-    inetd_program="/usr/sbin/inetd" # path to inetd, if you want a different one.\r
-    inetd_flags="-wW"               # Optional flags to inetd\r
-\r
-\r
-### 2.6.2 Network Setup \r
-\r
-For acquiring an IP address through DHCP, place this entry in /etc/rc.conf, using the appropriate card name. (ep0 is used as an example here.)\r
-\r
-    \r
-              ifconfig_`***ep0***`="DHCP"\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-For a fixed IP, /etc/rc.conf requires a few more lines of data. (Again, ep0 is used as an example here.) Supply the correct local values for IP, netmask, and default router. The hostname should reflect what is entered in DNS for this computer.\r
-\r
-    \r
-              ifconfig_`***ep0***`="inet `***123.234.345.456***` netmask `***255.255.255.0***`"\r
-              hostname="`***myhostname***`"\r
-              defaultrouter="`***654.543.432.321***`"\r
-    \r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-installation\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-jails-application.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-jails-application.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7a22cfa..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,378 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-# 12.6 Application of Jails \r
-\r
-## 12.6.1 Service Jails \r
- ***Contributed by Daniel Gerzo.***\r
-\r
-***\r
- This section is based upon an idea originally presented by Simon L. Nielsen <simon@freebsd.org> at http://simon.nitro.dk/service-jails.html, and an updated article written by Ken Tom <locals@gmail.com>. This section illustrates how to set up a DragonFly system that adds an additional layer of security, using the [jail(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#jail&section8) feature. It is also assumed that the given system is at least running DragonFly 1.7 and the information provided earlier in this chapter has been well understood.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.1.1 Design \r
-\r
- One of the major problems with jails is the management of their upgrade process. This tends to be a problem because every jail has to be rebuilt from scratch whenever it is updated. This is usually not a problem for a single jail, since the update process is fairly simple, but can be quite time consuming and tedious if a lot of jails are created.\r
-\r
-***\r
- This idea has been presented to resolve such issues by sharing as much as is possible between jails, in a safe way -- using read-only [mount_null(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount_null&section8) mounts, so that updating will be simpler, and putting single services into individual jails will become more attractive. Additionally, it provides a simple way to add or remove jails as well as a way to upgrade them.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-   **Note:**  Examples of services in this context are: an HTTP server, a DNS server, a SMTP server, and so forth.\r
-\r
-***\r
- The goals of the setup described in this section are:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Create a simple and easy to understand jail structure. This implies not having to run a full installworld on each and every jail.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Make it easy to add new jails or remove existing ones.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Make it easy to update or upgrade existing jails.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Make it possible to run a customized DragonFly branch.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Be paranoid about security, reducing as much as possible the possibility of compromise.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Save space and inodes, as much as possible.\r
-\r
-***\r
- As it has been already mentioned, this design relies heavily on having a single master template which is read-only (known as  **nullfs** ) mounted into each jail and one read-write device per jail. A device can be a separate physical disc, a partition, or a vnode backed [md(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#md&section4) device. In this example, we will use read-write nullfs mounts.\r
-\r
-***\r
- The file system layout is described in the following list:\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Each jail will be mounted under the ***/home/jails*** directory.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* ***/home/jails/mroot*** is the template for each jail and the read-only partition for all of the jails.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* A blank directory will be created for each jail under the ***/home/jails*** directory.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Each jail will have a ***/s*** directory, that will be linked to the read-write portion of the system.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Each jail shall have its own read-write system that is based upon ***/home/jails/skel***.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-
-* Each jailspace (read-write portion of each jail) shall be created in ***/home/jailspace***.\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-    **Note:**  This assumes that the jails are based under the ***/home*** partition. This can, of course, be changed to anything else, but this change will have to be reflected in each of the examples below.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.1.2 Creating the Template \r
-\r
- This section will describe the steps needed to create the master template that will be the read-only portion for the jails to use.\r
-\r
-***\r
- It is always a good idea to update the DragonFly system to the latest stable release before. Check the corresponding Handbook Chapter to accomplish this task. In the case the update is not feasible, the buildworld will be required in order to be able to proceed. \r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#1 First, create a directory structure for the read-only file system which will contain the DragonFly binaries for our jails, then change directory to the DragonFly source tree and install the read-only file system to the jail template:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jails /home/jails/mroot\r
-    # cd /usr/src\r
-    # make installworld DESTDIR=/home/jails/mroot\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#2 Next, prepare a DragonFly Pkgsrc Framework for the jails as well as a DragonFly source tree, which is required for  **mergemaster** :\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jails/mroot/usr\r
-    # cd /home/jails/mroot/usr\r
-    # cvs -d anoncvs@anoncvs.us.netbsd.org:/cvsroot co pkgsrc\r
-    # cpdup /usr/src /home/jails/mroot/usr/src\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#3 Create a skeleton for the read-write portion of the system:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jails/skel /home/jails/skel/home /home/jails/skel/usr-X11R6 /home/jails/skel/distfiles\r
-    # mv etc /home/jails/skel\r
-    # mv usr/local /home/jails/skel/usr-local\r
-    # mv tmp /home/jails/skel\r
-    # mv var /home/jails/skel\r
-    # mv root /home/jails/skel\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#4 Use  **mergemaster**  to install missing configuration files. Then get rid of the extra directories that  **mergemaster**  creates:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mergemaster -t /home/jails/skel/var/tmp/temproot -D /home/jails/skel -i\r
-    # cd /home/jails/skel\r
-    # rm -R bin boot lib libexec mnt proc rescue sbin sys usr dev\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#5 Now, symlink the read-write file system to the read-only file system. Please make sure that the symlinks are created in the correct s/ locations. Real directories or the creation of directories in the wrong locations will cause the installation to fail.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # cd /home/jails/mroot\r
-    # mkdir s\r
-    # ln -s s/etc etc\r
-    # ln -s s/home home\r
-    # ln -s s/root root\r
-    # ln -s ../s/usr-local usr/local\r
-    # ln -s ../s/usr-X11R6 usr/X11R6\r
-    # ln -s ../../s/distfiles usr/ports/distfiles\r
-    # ln -s s/tmp tmp\r
-    # ln -s s/var var\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#6 As a last step, create a generic ***/home/jails/skel/etc/make.conf*** with its contents as shown below:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    WRKDIRPREFIX?=/s/portbuild\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  Having WRKDIRPREFIX set up this way will make it possible to compile DragonFly packages inside each jail. Remember that the pkgsrc directory is part of the read-only system. The custom path for WRKDIRPREFIX allows builds to be done in the read-write portion of every jail.\r
-\r
-### 12.6.1.3 Creating Jails \r
-\r
- Now that we have a complete DragonFly jail template, we can setup and configure the jails in ***/etc/rc.conf***. This example demonstrates the creation of 3 jails: “NS”, “MAIL” and “WWW”.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#1 Put the following lines into the ***/etc/fstab*** file, so that the read-only template for the jails and the read-write space will be available in the respective jails:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    /home/jails/mroot   /home/jails/ns     null  ro  0   0\r
-    /home/jails/mroot   /home/jails/mail   null  ro  0   0\r
-    /home/jails/mroot   /home/jails/www    null  ro  0   0\r
-    /home/jailspace/ns     /home/jails/ns/s   null  rw  0   0\r
-    /home/jailspace/mail   /home/jails/mail/s null  rw  0   0\r
-    /home/jailspace/www    /home/jails/www/s  null  rw  0   0\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  ***\r
-    **Note:**  Partitions marked with a 0 pass number are not checked by [fsck(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#fsck&section8) during boot, and partitions marked with a 0 dump number are not backed up by [dump(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=dump&section=8). We do not want fsck to check null mounts or dump to back up the read-only null mounts of the jails. This is why they are marked with “0 0” in the last two columns of each fstab entry above.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#2 Configure the jails in ***/etc/rc.conf***:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    jail_enable="YES"\r
-    jail_set_hostname_allow="NO"\r
-    jail_list="ns mail www"\r
-    jail_ns_hostname="ns.example.org"\r
-    jail_ns_ip="192.168.3.17"\r
-    jail_ns_rootdir="/home/jails/ns"\r
-    jail_mail_hostname="mail.example.org"\r
-    jail_mail_ip="192.168.3.18"\r
-    jail_mail_rootdir="/home/jails/mail"\r
-    jail_www_hostname="www.example.org"\r
-    jail_www_ip="62.123.43.14"\r
-    jail_www_rootdir="/home/jails/www"\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#3 Create the required mount points for the read-only file system of each jail:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jails/ns /home/jails/mail /home/jails/www\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#4 Install the read-write template into each jail. Note the use of ***cpdup***, which helps to ensure that a correct copy is done of each directory:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jailspace\r
-    # cpdup /home/jails/skel /home/jailspace/ns\r
-    # cpdup /home/jails/skel /home/jailspace/mail\r
-    # cpdup /home/jails/skel /home/jailspace/www\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#5 In this phase, the jails are built and prepared to run. First, mount the required file systems for each jail, and then start them using the ***/etc/rc.d/jail*** script:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mount -a\r
-    # /etc/rc.d/jail start\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- The jails should be running now. To check if they have started correctly, use the [jls(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#jls&section8) command. Its output should be similar to the following:\r
-\r
- ***\r
-     \r
-    # jls\r
-       JID  IP Address      Hostname                      Path\r
-         3  192.168.3.17    ns.example.org                /home/jails/ns\r
-         2  192.168.3.18    mail.example.org              /home/jails/mail\r
-         1  62.123.43.14    www.example.org               /home/jails/www\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- At this point, it should be possible to log onto each jail, add new users or configure daemons. The JID column indicates the jail identification number of each running jail. Use the following command in order to perform administrative tasks in the jail whose JID is 3:\r
-\r
-***\r
-     \r
-    # jexec 3 tcsh\r
-\r
-\r
-### 12.6.1.4 Upgrading \r
-\r
- In time, there will be a need to upgrade the system to a newer version of DragonFly, either because of a security issue, or because new features have been implemented which are useful for the existing jails. The design of this setup provides an easy way to upgrade existing jails. Additionally, it minimizes their downtime, as the jails will be brought down only in the very last minute. Also, it provides a way to roll back to the older versions should any problems occur.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#1 The first step is to upgrade the host system in the usual manner. Then create a new temporary read-only template in ***/home/jails/mroot2***.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mkdir /home/jails/mroot2\r
-    # cd /usr/src\r
-    # make installworld DESTDIR=/home/jails/mroot2\r
-    # cd /home/jails/mroot2\r
-    # cpdup /usr/src usr/src\r
-    # mkdir s\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  The ***installworld*** run creates a few unnecessary directories, which should be removed:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # chflags -R 0 var\r
-    # rm -R etc var root usr/local tmp\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#2 Recreate the read-write symlinks for the master file system:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # ln -s s/etc etc\r
-    # ln -s s/root root\r
-    # ln -s s/home home\r
-    # ln -s ../s/usr-local usr/local\r
-    # ln -s ../s/usr-X11R6 usr/X11R6\r
-    # ln -s s/tmp tmp\r
-    # ln -s s/var var\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#3 The right time to stop the jails is now:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # /etc/rc.d/jail stop\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#4 Unmount the original file systems:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # umount /home/jails/ns/s\r
-    # umount /home/jails/ns\r
-    # umount /home/jails/mail/s\r
-    # umount /home/jails/mail\r
-    # umount /home/jails/www/s\r
-    # umount /home/jails/www\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  ***\r
-    **Note:**  The read-write systems are attached to the read-only system (***/s***) and must be unmounted first.\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#5 Move the old read-only file system and replace it with the new one. This will serve as a backup and archive of the old read-only file system should something go wrong. The naming convention used here corresponds to when a new read-only file system has been created. Move the original DragonFly Packagesource Framework over to the new file system to save some space and inodes:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # cd /home/jails\r
-    # mv mroot mroot.20060601\r
-    # mv mroot2 mroot\r
-    # mv mroot.20060601/usr/ports mroot/usr\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-  1.#6 At this point the new read-only template is ready, so the only remaining task is to remount the file systems and start the jails:\r
-\r
-***\r
- ***\r
-      \r
-    # mount -a\r
-    # /etc/rc.d/jail start\r
-\r
-\r
-***\r
- Use [jls(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#jls&section8) to check if the jails started correctly. Do not forget to run mergemaster in each jail. The configuration files will need to be updated as well as the rc.d scripts.\r
-\r
-----\r
-\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-basics.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-basics.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 5971f2d..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,22 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 14.2 The Basics \r
-\r
-### 14.2.1 What Is I18N/L10N? \r
-\r
-Developers shortened internationalization into the term I18N, counting the number of letters between the first and the last letters of internationalization. L10N uses the same naming scheme, coming from ***localization***. Combined together, I18N/L10N methods, protocols, and applications allow users to use languages of their choice.\r
-\r
-I18N applications are programmed using I18N kits under libraries. It allows for developers to write a simple file and translate displayed menus and texts to each language. We strongly encourage programmers to follow this convention.\r
-\r
-### 14.2.2 Why Should I Use I18N/L10N? \r
-\r
-I18N/L10N is used whenever you wish to either view, input, or process data in non-English languages.\r
-\r
-### 14.2.3 What Languages Are Supported in the I18N Effort? \r
-\r
-I18N and L10N are not DragonFly specific. Currently, one can choose from most of the major languages of the World, including but not limited to: Chinese, German, Japanese, Korean, French, Russian, Vietnamese and others.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-localization\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-compiling.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n-compiling.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3dd9366..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,5 +0,0 @@
-## 14.4 Compiling I18N Programs \r
-\r
-Many FreeBSD Ports have been ported with I18N support. Some of them are marked with -I18N in the port name. These and many other programs have built in support for I18N and need no special consideration.\r
-\r
-However, some applications such as  **MySQL**  need to be have the `Makefile` configured with the specific charset. This is usually done in the `Makefile` or done by passing a value to  **configure**  in the source.\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-l10n.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ad13fce..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,43 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 14 Localization - I18N/L10N Usage and Setup \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 14.1 [ Synopsis](l10n.html#L10N-SYNOPSIS)\r
-
-* 14.2 [The Basics](l10n-basics.html)\r
-
-* 14.3 [Using Localization](using-localization.html)\r
-
-* 14.4 [Compiling I18N Programs](l10n-compiling.html)\r
-
-* 14.5 [Localizing DragonFly to Specific Languages](lang-setup.html)\r
-***Contributed by Andrey A. Chernov. Rewritten by Michael C. Wu. ***\r
-\r
-## 14.1 Synopsis \r
-\r
-DragonFly is a very distributed project with users and contributors located all over the world. This chapter discusses the internationalization and localization features of DragonFly that allow non-English speaking users to get real work done. There are many aspects of the i18n implementation in both the system and application levels, so where applicable we refer the reader to more specific sources of documentation.\r
-\r
-After reading this chapter, you will know:\r
-\r
-
-* How different languages and locales are encoded on modern operating systems.\r
-
-* How to set the locale for your login shell.\r
-
-* How to configure your console for non-English languages.\r
-
-* How to use X Window System effectively with different languages.\r
-
-* Where to find more information about writing i18n-compliant applications.\r
-\r
-Before reading this chapter, you should:\r
-\r
-
-* Know how to install additional third-party applications ([Chapter 4](pkgsrc.html)).\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-lang-setup.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-lang-setup.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 16b75b8..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,137 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 14.5 Localizing DragonFly to Specific Languages \r
-\r
-### 14.5.1 Russian Language (KOI8-R Encoding) \r
-\r
-***Originally contributed by Andrey A. Chernov. ***\r
-\r
-For more information about KOI8-R encoding, see the [KOI8-R References (Russian Net Character Set)](http://koi8.pp.ru/).\r
-\r
-#### 14.5.1.1 Locale Setup \r
-\r
-Put the following lines into your `~/.login_conf` file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    me:My Account:\\r
-       :charset=KOI8-R:\\r
-       :lang=ru_RU.KOI8-R:\r
-\r
-\r
-See earlier in this chapter for examples of setting up the [locale](using-localization.html#SETTING-LOCALE).\r
-\r
-#### 14.5.1.2 Console Setup \r
-\r
-
-* Add the following line to your kernel configuration file:\r
-      \r
-      options          SC_MOUSE_CHAR=0x03\r
-  \r
-  Insert the following line into `/etc/rc.conf`:\r
-      \r
-      mousechar_start=3\r
-  \r
-
-* Use following settings in `/etc/rc.conf`:\r
-      \r
-      keymap="ru.koi8-r"\r
-      scrnmap="koi8-r2cp866"\r
-      font8x16="cp866b-8x16"\r
-      font8x14="cp866-8x14"\r
-      font8x8="cp866-8x8"\r
-  \r
-
-* For each `ttyv*` entry in `/etc/ttys`, use `cons25r` as the terminal type.\r
-\r
-See earlier in this chapter for examples of setting up the [console](using-localization.html#SETTING-CONSOLE).\r
-\r
-#### 14.5.1.3 Printer Setup \r
-\r
-Since most printers with Russian characters come with hardware code page CP866, a special output filter is needed to convert from KOI8-R to CP866. Such a filter is installed by default as `/usr/libexec/lpr/ru/koi2alt`. A Russian printer `/etc/printcap` entry should look like:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    lp|Russian local line printer:\\r
-       :sh:of=/usr/libexec/lpr/ru/koi2alt:\\r
-       :lp#/dev/lpt0:sd/var/spool/output/lpd:lf=/var/log/lpd-errs:\r
-\r
-\r
-See [printcap(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#printcap&section5) for a detailed description.\r
-\r
-#### 14.5.1.4 MS-DOS® FS and Russian Filenames \r
-\r
-The following example [fstab(5)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#fstab&section5) entry enables support for Russian filenames in mounted MS-DOS® filesystems:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    /dev/ad0s2      /dos/c  msdos   rw,-Wkoi2dos,-Lru_RU.KOI8-R 0 0\r
-\r
-\r
-The option `-L` selects the locale name used, and `-W` sets the character conversion table. To use the `-W` option, be sure to mount `/usr` before the MS-DOS partition because the conversion tables are located in `/usr/libdata/msdosfs`. For more informations, see the [mount_msdos(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount_msdos&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;section8) manual page.\r
-\r
-#### 14.5.1.5 X11 Setup \r
-\r
-  1. Do [using-localization.html#SETTING-LOCALE non-X locale setup] first as described.\r
-   **Note:** The Russian KOI8-R locale may not work with old  **XFree86™**  releases (lower than 3.3).  **XFree86 4.X**  is now the default version of the X Window System on DragonFly. This should not be an issue unless you explicitly install an older version of  **XFree86** .\r
-  1. Go to the [russian/X.language](http://pkgsrc.se/russian/X.language) directory and issue the following command:\r
-      \r
-      # make install\r
-  \r
-  The above port installs the latest version of the KOI8-R fonts. ***'XFree86 3.3***' already has some KOI8-R fonts, but these are scaled better.\r
-  Check the `"Files"` section in your `/etc/XF86Config` file. The following lines must be added ***before*** any other `FontPath` entries:\r
-      \r
-      FontPath   "/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/cyrillic/misc"\r
-      FontPath   "/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/cyrillic/75dpi"\r
-      FontPath   "/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/cyrillic/100dpi"\r
-  \r
-  If you use a high resolution video mode, swap the 75 dpi and 100 dpi lines.\r
-  1. To activate a Russian keyboard, add the following to the `"Keyboard"` section of your `XF86Config` file.\r
-  For ***'XFree86 3.X***':\r
-      \r
-      XkbLayout  "ru"\r
-      XkbOptions "grp:caps_toggle"\r
-  \r
-  For  **XFree86 4.X** :\r
-      \r
-      Option "XkbLayout"   "ru"\r
-      Option "XkbOptions"  "grp:caps_toggle"\r
-  \r
-  Also make sure that `XkbDisable` is turned off (commented out) there.\r
-  The RUS/LAT switch will be  **CapsLock** . The old  **CapsLock**  function is still available via  **Shift** + **CapsLock**  (in LAT mode only).\r
-  If you have ***Windows®*** keys on your keyboard, and notice that some non-alphabetical keys are mapped incorrectly in RUS mode, add the following line in your `XF86Config` file.\r
-  For ***'XFree86 3.X***':\r
-      \r
-      XkbVariant "winkeys"\r
-  \r
-  For  **XFree86 4.X** :\r
-      \r
-      Option "XkbVariant" "winkeys"\r
-  \r
-   **Note:** The Russian XKB keyboard may not work with old  **XFree86**  versions, see the [lang-setup.html#RUSSIAN-NOTE above note] for more information. The Russian XKB keyboard may also not work with non-localized applications as well. Minimally localized applications should call a `XtSetLanguageProc (NULL, NULL, NULL);` function early in the program. See [KOI8-R for X Window](http://koi8.pp.ru/xwin.html) for more instructions on localizing X11 applications.\r
-\r
-### 14.5.2 Traditional Chinese Localization for Taiwan \r
-\r
-The FreeBSD-Taiwan Project has an I18N/L10N tutorial for FreeBSD at http://freebsd.sinica.edu.tw/~ncvs/zh-l10n-tut/ using many Chinese ports. Much of that project can apply to DragonFly. The editor for the `zh-L10N-tut` is Clive Lin. You can also cvsup the following collections at `freebsd.sinica.edu.tw`:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Collection | Description 
- outta-port tag=. | Beta-quality ports collection for Chinese 
- zh-L10N-tut tag=. | Localizing FreeBSD Tutorial in BIG-5 Traditional Chinese 
- zh-doc tag=. | FreeBSD Documentation Translation to BIG-5 Traditional Chinese |\r
-"""]]\r
-Chuan-Hsing Shen has created the [Chinese FreeBSD Collection (CFC)](http://cnpa.yzu.edu.tw/~cfc/) using FreeBSD-Taiwan's `zh-L10N-tut`. The packages and the script files are available at ftp://ftp.csie.ncu.edu.tw/OS/FreeBSD/taiwan/CFC/.\r
-\r
-### 14.5.3 German Language Localization (for All ISO 8859-1 Languages) \r
-\r
-Slaven Rezic `<[mailto:eserte@cs.tu-berlin.de eserte@cs.tu-berlin.de]>` wrote a tutorial how to use umlauts on a FreeBSD machine. The tutorial is written in German and available at http://www.de.FreeBSD.org/de/umlaute/.\r
-\r
-### 14.5.4 Japanese and Korean Language Localization \r
-\r
-For Japanese, refer to http://www.jp.FreeBSD.org/, and for Korean, refer to http://www.kr.FreeBSD.org/.\r
-\r
-### 14.5.5 Non-English DragonFly Documentation \r
-\r
-Non-English documentation will be made available as it is created, at the [main site](../../../../index.html) or in `/usr/share/doc`.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-localization\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-advanced.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-advanced.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 90193f9..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,61 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.8 Advanced Topics \r
-\r
-If you are curious as to how the Linux binary compatibility works, this is the section you want to read. Most of what follows is based heavily on an email written to [FreeBSD chat mailing list](http://lists.FreeBSD.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-chat) by Terry Lambert `&lt;[mailto:tlambert@primenet.com tlambert@primenet.com]&gt;` (Message ID: `&lt;199906020108.SAA07001@usr09.primenet.com&gt;`).\r
-\r
- **Warning:** This description applies to FreeBSD, for which it was originally written. This may or may not apply to DragonFly at this point; while FreeBSD 4.x features usually translate over to DragonFly well, your mileage may vary.\r
-\r
-### 22.8.1 How Does It Work? \r
-\r
-DragonFly has an abstraction called an ***execution class loader***. This is a wedge into the [execve(2)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#execve&section2) system call.\r
-\r
-What happens is that DragonFly has a list of loaders, instead of a single loader with a fallback to the `#!` loader for running any shell interpreters or shell scripts.\r
-\r
-Historically, the only loader on the UNIX® platform examined the magic number (generally the first 4 or 8 bytes of the file) to see if it was a binary known to the system, and if so, invoked the binary loader.\r
-\r
-If it was not the binary type for the system, the [execve(2)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#execve&section2) call returned a failure, and the shell attempted to start executing it as shell commands.\r
-\r
-The assumption was a default of ***whatever the current shell is***.\r
-\r
-Later, a hack was made for [sh(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#sh&section1) to examine the first two characters, and if they were `:\n`, then it invoked the [csh(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=csh&section=1) shell instead (we believe SCO first made this hack).\r
-\r
-What DragonFly does now is go through a list of loaders, with a generic `#!` loader that knows about interpreters as the characters which follow to the next whitespace next to last, followed by a fallback to `/bin/sh`.\r
-\r
-For the Linux ABI support, DragonFly sees the magic number as an ELF binary (it makes no distinction between FreeBSD, Solaris™, Linux, or any other OS which has an ELF image type, at this point).\r
-\r
-The ELF loader looks for a specialized ***brand***, which is a comment section in the ELF image, and which is not present on SVR4/Solaris ELF binaries.\r
-\r
-For Linux binaries to function, they must be ***branded*** as type `Linux` from [brandelf(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#brandelf&section1):\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # brandelf -t Linux file\r
-\r
-\r
-When this is done, the ELF loader will see the `Linux` brand on the file.\r
-\r
-When the ELF loader sees the `Linux` brand, the loader replaces a pointer in the `proc` structure. All system calls are indexed through this pointer (in a traditional UNIX system, this would be the `sysent[]` structure array, containing the system calls). In addition, the process is flagged for special handling of the trap vector for the signal trampoline code, and several other (minor) fix-ups that are handled by the Linux kernel module.\r
-\r
-The Linux system call vector contains, among other things, a list of `sysent[]` entries whose addresses reside in the kernel module.\r
-\r
-When a system call is called by the Linux binary, the trap code dereferences the system call function pointer off the `proc` structure, and gets the Linux, not the DragonFly, system call entry points.\r
-\r
-In addition, the Linux mode dynamically ***reroots*** lookups; this is, in effect, what the `union` option to file system mounts (***not*** the `unionfs` file system type!) does. First, an attempt is made to lookup the file in the `/compat/linux/`***original-path****** directory, ***then*** only if that fails, the lookup is done in the `/`***original-path****** directory. This makes sure that binaries that require other binaries can run (e.g., the Linux toolchain can all run under Linux ABI support). It also means that the Linux binaries can load and execute DragonFly binaries, if there are no corresponding Linux binaries present, and that you could place a [uname(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#uname&section1) command in the `/compat/linux` directory tree to ensure that the Linux binaries could not tell they were not running on Linux.\r
-\r
-In effect, there is a Linux kernel in the DragonFly kernel; the various underlying functions that implement all of the services provided by the kernel are identical to both the DragonFly system call table entries, and the Linux system call table entries: file system operations, virtual memory operations, signal delivery, System V IPC, etc... The only difference is that DragonFly binaries get the DragonFly ***glue*** functions, and Linux binaries get the Linux ***glue*** functions (most older OS's only had their own ***glue*** functions: addresses of functions in a static global `sysent[]` structure array, instead of addresses of functions dereferenced off a dynamically initialized pointer in the `proc` structure of the process making the call).\r
-\r
-Which one is the native DragonFly ABI? It does not matter. Basically the only difference is that (currently; this could easily be changed in a future release, and probably will be after this) the DragonFly ***glue*** functions are statically linked into the kernel, and the Linux ***glue*** functions can be statically linked, or they can be accessed via a kernel module.\r
-\r
-Yeah, but is this really emulation? No. It is an ABI implementation, not an emulation. There is no emulator (or simulator, to cut off the next question) involved.\r
-\r
-So why is it sometimes called ***Linux emulation***? To make it hard to sell DragonFly! Really, it is because the historical implementation was done at a time when there was really no word other than that to describe what was going on; saying that FreeBSD [(1)](#FTN.AEN29365) ran Linux binaries was not true, if you did not compile the code in or load a module, and there needed to be a word to describe what was being loaded--hence ***the Linux emulator***.\r
-\r
-#### Notes \r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-|<tablestyle="width:100%"> [linuxemu-advanced.html#AEN29365 (1)] | FreeBSD's original Linux compatibility code was committed in June 1995. It fulfilled milestone number one: running DOOM. |\r
-"""]]\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-lbc-install.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-lbc-install.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4493639..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,135 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.2 Installation \r
-\r
-Linux binary compatibility is not turned on by default. The easiest way to enable this functionality is to load the `linux` KLD object (***Kernel Loadable Device***). You can load this module by simply typing `linux` at the command prompt.\r
-\r
-If you would like Linux compatibility to always be enabled, then you should add the following line to `/etc/rc.conf`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    linux_enable="YES"\r
-\r
-\r
-The [kldstat(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#kldstat&section8) command can be used to verify that the KLD is loaded:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % kldstat\r
-    Id Refs Address    Size     Name\r
-     1    2 0xc0100000 16bdb8   kernel\r
-     7    1 0xc24db000 d000     linux.ko\r
-\r
-\r
-If for some reason you do not want to or cannot load the KLD, then you may statically link Linux binary compatibility into the kernel by adding `options COMPAT_LINUX` to your kernel configuration file. Then install your new kernel as described in [kernelconfig.html Chapter 9].\r
-\r
-### 22.2.1 Installing Linux Runtime Libraries \r
-\r
-This can be done one of two ways, either by using the [linuxemu-lbc-install.html#LINUXEMU-SUSE-PKGSRC suse] package, or by installing them [linuxemu-lbc-install.html#LINUXEMU-LIBS-MANUALLY manually].\r
-\r
-#### 22.2.1.1 Installing Using suse Package \r
-\r
-This is by far the easiest method to use when installing the runtime libraries. It is just like installing any other package from the [pkgsrc collection](file://localhost/usr/pkgsrc/). Simply do the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/pkgsrc/meta-pkgs/suse9\r
-    # make install distclean\r
-    # ln -s /usr/pkg/emul /compat\r
-\r
-\r
-You should now have working Linux binary compatibility. Some programs may complain about incorrect minor versions of the system libraries. In general, however, this does not seem to be a problem.\r
-\r
- **Note:** There may be multiple versions of the [`meta-pkgs/suse`](http://pkgsrc.se/meta-pkgs/suse) package available, corresponding to different versions of various Linux distributions. You should install the package most closely resembling the requirements of the Linux applications you would like to install.\r
-\r
-#### 22.2.1.2 Installing Libraries Manually \r
-\r
-If you do not have the ***pkgsrc*** collection installed, you can install the libraries by hand instead. You will need the Linux shared libraries that the program depends on and the runtime linker. Also, you will need to create a ***shadow root*** directory, `/compat/linux`, for Linux libraries on your DragonFly system. Any shared libraries opened by Linux programs run under DragonFly will look in this tree first. So, if a Linux program loads, for example, `/lib/libc.so`, DragonFly will first try to open `/compat/linux/lib/libc.so`, and if that does not exist, it will then try `/lib/libc.so`. Shared libraries should be installed in the shadow tree `/compat/linux/lib` rather than the paths that the Linux `ld.so` reports.\r
-\r
-Generally, you will need to look for the shared libraries that Linux binaries depend on only the first few times that you install a Linux program on your DragonFly system. After a while, you will have a sufficient set of Linux shared libraries on your system to be able to run newly imported Linux binaries without any extra work.\r
-\r
-#### 22.2.1.3 How to Install Additional Shared Libraries \r
-\r
-What if you install the `suse` package and your application still complains about missing shared libraries? How do you know which shared libraries Linux binaries need, and where to get them? Basically, there are 2 possibilities (when following these instructions you will need to be `root` on your DragonFly system).\r
-\r
-If you have access to a Linux system, see what shared libraries the application needs, and copy them to your DragonFly system. Look at the following example:\r
-\r
-Let us assume you used FTP to get the Linux binary of  **Doom** , and put it on a Linux system you have access to. You then can check which shared libraries it needs by running `ldd linuxdoom`, like so:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % ldd linuxdoom\r
-    libXt.so.3 (DLL Jump 3.1) =&gt; /usr/X11/lib/libXt.so.3.1.0\r
-    libX11.so.3 (DLL Jump 3.1) =&gt; /usr/X11/lib/libX11.so.3.1.0\r
-    libc.so.4 (DLL Jump 4.5pl26) =&gt; /lib/libc.so.4.6.29\r
-\r
-\r
-You would need to get all the files from the last column, and put them under `/compat/linux`, with the names in the first column as symbolic links pointing to them. This means you eventually have these files on your DragonFly system:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    /compat/linux/usr/X11/lib/libXt.so.3.1.0\r
-    /compat/linux/usr/X11/lib/libXt.so.3 -&gt; libXt.so.3.1.0\r
-    /compat/linux/usr/X11/lib/libX11.so.3.1.0\r
-    /compat/linux/usr/X11/lib/libX11.so.3 -&gt; libX11.so.3.1.0\r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4.6.29\r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4 -&gt; libc.so.4.6.29\r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** Note that if you already have a Linux shared library with a matching major revision number to the first column of the `ldd` output, you will not need to copy the file named in the last column to your system, the one you already have should work. It is advisable to copy the shared library anyway if it is a newer version, though. You can remove the old one, as long as you make the symbolic link point to the new one. So, if you have these libraries on your system:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4.6.27\r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4 -&gt; libc.so.4.6.27\r
-\r
-\r
-and you find a new binary that claims to require a later version according to the output of `ldd`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    libc.so.4 (DLL Jump 4.5pl26) -&gt; libc.so.4.6.29\r
-\r
-\r
-If it is only one or two versions out of date in the in the trailing digit then do not worry about copying `/lib/libc.so.4.6.29` too, because the program should work fine with the slightly older version. However, if you like, you can decide to replace the `libc.so` anyway, and that should leave you with:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4.6.29\r
-    /compat/linux/lib/libc.so.4 -&gt; libc.so.4.6.29\r
-\r
-\r
- **Note:** The symbolic link mechanism is ***only*** needed for Linux binaries. The DragonFly runtime linker takes care of looking for matching major revision numbers itself and you do not need to worry about it.\r
-\r
-### 22.2.2 Installing Linux ELF Binaries \r
-\r
-ELF binaries sometimes require an extra step of ***branding***. If you attempt to run an unbranded ELF binary, you will get an error message like the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % ./my-linux-elf-binary\r
-    ELF binary type not known\r
-    Abort\r
-\r
-\r
-To help the DragonFly kernel distinguish between a DragonFly ELF binary from a Linux binary, use the [brandelf(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#brandelf&section1) utility.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % brandelf -t Linux my-linux-elf-binary\r
-\r
-\r
-The GNU toolchain now places the appropriate branding information into ELF binaries automatically, so this step should only be needed for older, libc5 binaries.\r
-\r
-### 22.2.3 Configuring the Hostname Resolver \r
-\r
-If DNS does not work or you get this message:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    resolv+: "bind" is an invalid keyword resolv+:\r
-    "hosts" is an invalid keyword\r
-\r
-\r
-You will need to configure a `/compat/linux/etc/host.conf` file containing:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    order hosts, bind\r
-    multi on\r
-\r
-\r
-The order here specifies that `/etc/hosts` is searched first and DNS is searched second. When `/compat/linux/etc/host.conf` is not installed, Linux applications find DragonFly's `/etc/host.conf` and complain about the incompatible DragonFly syntax. You should remove `bind` if you have not configured a name server using the `/etc/resolv.conf` file.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-maple.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-maple.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index dbd1833..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,94 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.4 Installing Maple™ \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Aaron Kaplan. ******Thanks to Robert Getschmann. ***\r
-\r
- **Maple™**  is a commercial mathematics program similar to  **Mathematica®** . You must purchase this software from http://www.maplesoft.com/ and then register there for a license file. To install this software on DragonFly, please follow these simple steps.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** This description applies to FreeBSD, for which it was originally written. This may or may not apply to DragonFly at this point; while FreeBSD 4.x features usually translate over to DragonFly well, your mileage may vary.\r
-\r
-  1. Execute the `INSTALL` shell script from the product distribution. Choose the ***RedHat*** option when prompted by the installation program. A typical installation directory might be `/usr/local/maple`.\r
-  1. If you have not done so, order a license for  **Maple**  from Maple Waterloo Software (http://register.maplesoft.com/) and copy it to `/usr/local/maple/license/license.dat`.\r
-  1. Install the  **FLEXlm**  license manager by running the `INSTALL_LIC` install shell script that comes with  **Maple** . Specify the primary hostname for your machine for the license server.\r
-  1. Patch the `/usr/local/maple/bin/maple.system.type` file with the following:\r
-      \r
-         ----- snip ------------------\r
-    
-*** maple.system.type.orig      Sun Jul  8 16:35:33 2001\r
-      --- maple.system.type   Sun Jul  8 16:35:51 2001\r
-    
-***************\r
-    
-*** 72,77 ****\r
-      --- 72,78 ----\r
-                # the IBM RS/6000 AIX case\r
-                MAPLE_BIN="bin.IBM_RISC_UNIX"\r
-                ;;\r
-      +     "DragonFly"|\\r
-            "Linux")\r
-                # the Linux/x86 case\r
-              # We have two Linux implementations, one for Red Hat and\r
-         ----- snip end of patch -----\r
-  \r
-  Please note that after the `"DragonFly"|\` no other whitespace should be present.\r
-  This patch instructs  **Maple**  to recognize ***DragonFly*** as a type of Linux system. The `bin/maple` shell script calls the `bin/maple.system.type` shell script which in turn calls `uname -a` to find out the operating system name. Depending on the OS name it will find out which binaries to use.\r
-  1. Start the license server.\r
-  The following script, installed as `/usr/local/etc/rc.d/lmgrd.sh` is a convenient way to start up `lmgrd`:\r
-      \r
-         ----- snip ------------\r
-      #! /bin/sh\r
-      PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/X11R6/bin\r
-      PATH=${PATH}:/usr/local/maple/bin:/usr/local/maple/FLEXlm/UNIX/LINUX\r
-      export PATH\r
-      LICENSE_FILE=/usr/local/maple/license/license.dat\r
-      LOG=/var/log/lmgrd.log\r
-      case "$1" in\r
-      start)\r
-       lmgrd -c ${LICENSE_FILE} 2&gt;&gt; ${LOG} 1&gt;&amp;2\r
-       echo -n " lmgrd"\r
-       ;;\r
-      stop)\r
-       lmgrd -c ${LICENSE_FILE} -x lmdown 2&gt;&gt; ${LOG} 1&gt;&amp;2\r
-       ;;\r
-    
-*)\r
-       echo "Usage: `basename $0` {start|stop}" 1&gt;&amp;2\r
-       exit 64\r
-       ;;\r
-      esac\r
-      exit 0\r
-         ----- snip ------------\r
-  \r
-  1. Test-start  **Maple** :\r
-      \r
-      % cd /usr/local/maple/bin\r
-      % ./xmaple\r
-  \r
-  You should be up and running. Make sure to write Maplesoft to let them know you would like a native DragonFly version!\r
-\r
-### 22.4.1 Common Pitfalls \r
-\r
-
-* The  **FLEXlm**  license manager can be a difficult tool to work with. Additional documentation on the subject can be found at http://www.globetrotter.com/.\r
-
-* `lmgrd` is known to be very picky about the license file and to core dump if there are any problems. A correct license file should look like this:\r
-      \r
-      # ######################################################=\r
-      # License File for UNIX Installations ("Pointer File")\r
-      # ######################################################=\r
-      SERVER chillig ANY\r
-      #USE_SERVER\r
-      VENDOR maplelmg\r
-      FEATURE Maple maplelmg 2000.0831 permanent 1 XXXXXXXXXXXX \\r
-               PLATFORMS#i86_r ISSUER"Waterloo Maple Inc." \\r
-               ISSUED#11-may-2000 NOTICE" Technische Universitat Wien" \\r
-               SN=XXXXXXXXX\r
-  \r
-   **Note:** Serial number and key 'X***ed out. `chillig` is a hostname.\r
-  Editing the license file works as long as you do not touch the ***FEATURE*** line (which is protected by the license key).\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-mathematica.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-mathematica.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index de41ff4..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,90 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.3 Installing Mathematica® \r
-\r
-***Updated for Mathematica 4.X by Murray Stokely. ******Merged with work by Bojan Bistrovic. ***\r
-\r
-This document describes the process of installing the Linux version of  **Mathematica® 4.X**  onto a DragonFly system.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** This description applies to FreeBSD, for which it was originally written. This may or may not apply to DragonFly at this point; while FreeBSD 4.x features usually translate over to DragonFly well, your mileage may vary.\r
-\r
-The Linux version of  **Mathematica**  runs perfectly under DragonFly however the binaries shipped by Wolfram need to be branded so that DragonFly knows to use the Linux ABI to execute them.\r
-\r
-The Linux version of  **Mathematica**  or  **Mathematica for Students**  can be ordered directly from Wolfram at http://www.wolfram.com/.\r
-\r
-### 22.3.1 Branding the Linux Binaries \r
-\r
-The Linux binaries are located in the `Unix` directory of the  **Mathematica**  CDROM distributed by Wolfram. You need to copy this directory tree to your local hard drive so that you can brand the Linux binaries with [brandelf(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#brandelf&section1) before running the installer:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # mount /cdrom\r
-    # cp -rp /cdrom/Unix/ /localdir/\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/Kernel/Binaries/Linux/*\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/FrontEnd/Binaries/Linux/*\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/Installation/Binaries/Linux/*\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/Graphics/Binaries/Linux/*\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/Converters/Binaries/Linux/*\r
-    # brandelf -t Linux /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/LicenseManager/Binaries/Linux/mathlm\r
-    # cd /localdir/Installers/Linux/\r
-    # ./MathInstaller\r
-\r
-\r
-Alternatively, you can simply set the default ELF brand to Linux for all unbranded binaries with the command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # sysctl kern.fallback_elf_brand=3\r
-\r
-\r
-This will make DragonFly assume that unbranded ELF binaries use the Linux ABI and so you should be able to run the installer straight from the CDROM.\r
-\r
-### 22.3.2 Obtaining Your Mathematica Password \r
-\r
-Before you can run  **Mathematica**  you will have to obtain a password from Wolfram that corresponds to your ***machine ID***.\r
-\r
-Once you have installed the Linux compatibility runtime libraries and unpacked  **Mathematica**  you can obtain the ***machine ID*** by running the program `mathinfo` in the installation directory. This machine ID is based solely on the MAC address of your first Ethernet card.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /localdir/Files/SystemFiles/Installation/Binaries/Linux\r
-    # mathinfo\r
-    disco.example.com 7115-70839-20412\r
-\r
-\r
-When you register with Wolfram, either by email, phone or fax, you will give them the ***machine ID*** and they will respond with a corresponding password consisting of groups of numbers. You can then enter this information when you attempt to run  **Mathematica**  for the first time exactly as you would for any other  **Mathematica**  platform.\r
-\r
-### 22.3.3 Running the Mathematica Frontend over a Network \r
-\r
- **Mathematica**  uses some special fonts to display characters not present in any of the standard font sets (integrals, sums, Greek letters, etc.). The X protocol requires these fonts to be install ***locally***. This means you will have to copy these fonts from the CDROM or from a host with  **Mathematica**  installed to your local machine. These fonts are normally stored in `/cdrom/Unix/Files/SystemFiles/Fonts` on the CDROM, or `/usr/local/mathematica/SystemFiles/Fonts` on your hard drive. The actual fonts are in the subdirectories `Type1` and `X`. There are several ways to use them, as described below.\r
-\r
-The first way is to copy them into one of the existing font directories in `/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts`. This will require editing the `fonts.dir` file, adding the font names to it, and changing the number of fonts on the first line. Alternatively, you should also just be able to run [mkfontdir(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mkfontdir&section1&manpath=XFree86+4.3.0) in the directory you have copied them to.\r
-\r
-The second way to do this is to copy the directories to `/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts\r
-    # mkdir X\r
-    # mkdir MathType1\r
-    # cd /cdrom/Unix/Files/SystemFiles/Fonts\r
-    # cp X/* /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/X\r
-    # cp Type1/* /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/MathType1\r
-    # cd /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/X\r
-    # mkfontdir\r
-    # cd ../MathType1\r
-    # mkfontdir\r
-\r
-\r
-Now add the new font directories to your font path:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # xset fp+ /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/X\r
-    # xset fp+ /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/MathType1\r
-    # xset fp rehash\r
-\r
-\r
-If you are using the  **XFree86™**  server, you can have these font directories loaded automatically by adding them to your `XF86Config` file.\r
-\r
-If you ***do not*** already have a directory called `/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/Type1`, you can change the name of the `MathType1` directory in the example above to `Type1`.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-matlab.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-matlab.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 261c2e2..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,125 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.5 Installing MATLAB® \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Dan Pelleg. ***\r
-\r
-This document describes the process of installing the Linux version of  **MATLAB® version 6.5**  onto a DragonFly system. It works quite well, with the exception of the  **Java Virtual Machine™**  (see [linuxemu-matlab.html#MATLAB-JRE Section 22.5.3]).\r
-\r
-The Linux version of  **MATLAB**  can be ordered directly from The MathWorks at http://www.mathworks.com. Make sure you also get the license file or instructions how to create it. While you are there, let them know you would like a native DragonFly version of their software.\r
-\r
-### 22.5.1 Installing MATLAB \r
-\r
-To install  **MATLAB** , do the following:\r
-\r
-  1. Insert the installation CD and mount it. Become `root`, as recommended by the installation script. To start the installation script type:\r
-      \r
-      # /compat/linux/bin/sh /cdrom/install\r
-  \r
-   **Tip:** The installer is graphical. If you get errors about not being able to open a display, type `setenv HOME ~`***USER******, where `***USER***` is the user you did a [su(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#su&section1) as.\r
-  1. When asked for the  **MATLAB**  root directory, type: /compat/linux/usr/local/matlab.\r
-   **Tip:** For easier typing on the rest of the installation process, type this at your shell prompt: `set MATLAB=/compat/linux/usr/local/matlab`\r
-  1. Edit the license file as instructed when obtaining the  **MATLAB**  license.\r
-   **Tip:** You can prepare this file in advance using your favorite editor, and copy it to `$MATLAB/license.dat` before the installer asks you to edit it.\r
-  1. Complete the installation process.\r
-\r
-At this point your  **MATLAB**  installation is complete. The following steps apply ***glue*** to connect it to your DragonFly system.\r
-\r
-### 22.5.2 License Manager Startup \r
-\r
-  1. Create symlinks for the license manager scripts:\r
-      \r
-      # ln -s $MATLAB/etc/lmboot /usr/local/etc/lmboot_TMW\r
-      # ln -s $MATLAB/etc/lmdown /usr/local/etc/lmdown_TMW\r
-  \r
-  1. Create a startup file at `/usr/local/etc/rc.d/flexlm.sh`. The example below is a modified version of the distributed `$MATLAB/etc/rc.lm.glnx86`. The changes are file locations, and startup of the license manager under Linux emulation.\r
-      \r
-      #!/bin/sh\r
-      case "$1" in\r
-        start)\r
-              if [ -f /usr/local/etc/lmboot_TMW ]; then\r
-                    /compat/linux/bin/sh /usr/local/etc/lmboot_TMW -u `***username***` &amp;&amp; echo 'MATLAB_lmgrd'\r
-              fi\r
-              ;;\r
-        stop)\r
-       if [ -f /usr/local/etc/lmdown_TMW ]; then\r
-                  /compat/linux/bin/sh /usr/local/etc/lmdown_TMW  &gt; /dev/null 2&gt;&amp;1\r
-       fi\r
-              ;;\r
-    
-*)\r
-       echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop}"\r
-       exit 1\r
-       ;;\r
-      esac\r
-      exit 0\r
-  \r
-   **Important:** The file must be made executable:\r
-      \r
-      # chmod +x /usr/local/etc/rc.d/flexlm.sh\r
-  \r
-  You must also replace `***username***` above with the name of a valid user on your system (and not `root`).\r
-  1. Start the license manager with the command:\r
-      \r
-      # /usr/local/etc/rc.d/flexlm.sh start\r
-  \r
-\r
-### 22.5.3 Linking the Java™ Runtime Environment \r
-\r
-Change the  **Java™**  Runtime Environment (JRE) link to one working under DragonFly:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd $MATLAB/sys/java/jre/glnx86/\r
-    # unlink jre; ln -s ./jre1.1.8 ./jre\r
-\r
-\r
-### 22.5.4 Creating a MATLAB Startup Script \r
-\r
-  1. Place the following startup script in `/usr/local/bin/matlab`:\r
-      \r
-      #!/bin/sh\r
-      /compat/linux/bin/sh /compat/linux/usr/local/matlab/bin/matlab "$@"\r
-  \r
-  1. Then type the command `chmod +x /usr/local/bin/matlab`.\r
-\r
- **Tip:** Depending on your version of [`emulators/linux_base`](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/linux_base), you may run into errors when running this script. To avoid that, edit the file `/compat/linux/usr/local/matlab/bin/matlab`, and change the line that says:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    if [ `expr "$lscmd" : '.*-&gt;.*'` -ne 0 ]; then\r
-\r
-\r
-(in version 13.0.1 it is on line 410) to this line:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    if test -L $newbase; then\r
-\r
-\r
-### 22.5.5 Creating a MATLAB Shutdown Script \r
-\r
-The following is needed to solve a problem with MATLAB not exiting correctly.\r
-\r
-  1. Create a file `$MATLAB/toolbox/local/finish.m`, and in it put the single line:\r
-      \r
-      ! $MATLAB/bin/finish.sh\r
-  \r
-   **Note:** The `$MATLAB` is literal.\r
-   **Tip:** In the same directory, you will find the files `finishsav.m` and `finishdlg.m`, which let you save your workspace before quitting. If you use either of them, insert the line above immediately after the `save` command.\r
-  1. Create a file `$MATLAB/bin/finish.sh`, which will contain the following:\r
-      \r
-      #!/usr/compat/linux/bin/sh\r
-      (sleep 5; killall -1 matlab_helper) &amp;\r
-      exit 0\r
-  \r
-  1. Make the file executable:\r
-      \r
-      # chmod +x $MATLAB/bin/finish.sh\r
-  \r
-\r
-### 22.5.6 Using MATLAB \r
-\r
-At this point you are ready to type `matlab` and start using it.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-oracle.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu-oracle.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c3fab6a..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,163 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 22.6 Installing Oracle® \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marcel Moolenaar. ***\r
-\r
-### 22.6.1 Preface \r
-\r
-This document describes the process of installing  **Oracle® 8.0.5**  and  **Oracle 8.0.5.1 Enterprise Edition**  for Linux onto a DragonFly machine.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** This description applies to FreeBSD, for which it was originally written. This may or may not apply to DragonFly at this point; while FreeBSD 4.x features usually translate over to DragonFly well, your mileage may vary.\r
-\r
-### 22.6.2 Installing the Linux Environment \r
-\r
-Make sure you have both [`emulators/linux_base`](http://pkgsrc.se/emulators/linux_base) and [`devel/linux_devtools`](http://pkgsrc.se/devel/linux_devtools) from the ports collection installed. If you run into difficulties with these ports, you may have to use the packages or older versions available in the ports collection.\r
-\r
-If you want to run the intelligent agent, you will also need to install the Red Hat Tcl package: `tcl-8.0.3-20.i386.rpm`. The general command for installing packages with the official  **RPM**  port ([`archivers/rpm`](http://pkgsrc.se/archivers/rpm)) is:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # rpm -i --ignoreos --root /compat/linux --dbpath /var/lib/rpm `***package***`\r
-\r
-\r
-Installation of the `***package***` should not generate any errors.\r
-\r
-### 22.6.3 Creating the Oracle Environment \r
-\r
-Before you can install  **Oracle** , you need to set up a proper environment. This document only describes what to do ***specially*** to run  **Oracle**  for Linux on DragonFly, not what has been described in the  **Oracle**  installation guide.\r
-\r
-#### 22.6.3.1 Kernel Tuning \r
-\r
-As described in the  **Oracle**  installation guide, you need to set the maximum size of shared memory. Do not use `SHMMAX` under DragonFly. `SHMMAX` is merely calculated out of `SHMMAXPGS` and `PGSIZE`. Therefore define `SHMMAXPGS`. All other options can be used as described in the guide. For example:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    options SHMMAXPGS=10000\r
-    options SHMMNI=100\r
-    options SHMSEG=10\r
-    options SEMMNS=200\r
-    options SEMMNI=70\r
-    options SEMMSL=61\r
-\r
-\r
-Set these options to suit your intended use of  **Oracle** .\r
-\r
-Also, make sure you have the following options in your kernel configuration file:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    options SYSVSHM #SysV shared memory\r
-    options SYSVSEM #SysV semaphores\r
-    options SYSVMSG #SysV interprocess communication\r
-\r
-\r
-#### 22.6.3.2 Oracle Account \r
-\r
-Create an `oracle` account just as you would create any other account. The `oracle` account is special only that you need to give it a Linux shell. Add `/compat/linux/bin/bash` to `/etc/shells` and set the shell for the `oracle` account to `/compat/linux/bin/bash`.\r
-\r
-#### 22.6.3.3 Environment \r
-\r
-Besides the normal  **Oracle**  variables, such as `ORACLE_HOME` and `ORACLE_SID` you must set the following environment variables:\r
-\r
-[[!table  data="""
-| Variable | Value 
- `LD_LIBRARY_PATH` | `$ORACLE_HOME/lib` 
- `CLASSPATH` | `$ORACLE_HOME/jdbc/lib/classes111.zip` 
- `PATH` | `/compat/linux/bin /compat/linux/sbin /compat/linux/usr/bin /compat/linux/usr/sbin /bin /sbin /usr/bin /usr/sbin /usr/local/bin $ORACLE_HOME/bin` |\r
-"""]]\r
-It is advised to set all the environment variables in `.profile`. A complete example is:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ORACLE_BASE=/oracle; export ORACLE_BASE\r
-    ORACLE_HOME=/oracle; export ORACLE_HOME\r
-    LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$ORACLE_HOME/lib\r
-    export LD_LIBRARY_PATH\r
-    ORACLE_SID=ORCL; export ORACLE_SID\r
-    ORACLE_TERM=386x; export ORACLE_TERM\r
-    CLASSPATH=$ORACLE_HOME/jdbc/lib/classes111.zip\r
-    export CLASSPATH\r
-    PATH=/compat/linux/bin:/compat/linux/sbin:/compat/linux/usr/bin\r
-    PATH=$PATH:/compat/linux/usr/sbin:/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin\r
-    PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/bin:$ORACLE_HOME/bin\r
-    export PATH\r
-\r
-\r
-### 22.6.4 Installing Oracle \r
-\r
-Due to a slight inconsistency in the Linux emulator, you need to create a directory named `.oracle` in `/var/tmp` before you start the installer. Either make it world writable or let it be owned by the `oracle` user. You should be able to install  **Oracle**  without any problems. If you have problems, check your  **Oracle**  distribution and/or configuration first! After you have installed  **Oracle** , apply the patches described in the next two subsections.\r
-\r
-A frequent problem is that the TCP protocol adapter is not installed right. As a consequence, you cannot start any TCP listeners. The following actions help solve this problem:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # cd $ORACLE_HOME/network/lib\r
-    # make -f ins_network.mk ntcontab.o\r
-    # cd $ORACLE_HOME/lib\r
-    # ar r libnetwork.a ntcontab.o\r
-    # cd $ORACLE_HOME/network/lib\r
-    # make -f ins_network.mk install\r
-\r
-\r
-Do not forget to run `root.sh` again!\r
-\r
-#### 22.6.4.1 Patching root.sh \r
-\r
-When installing  **Oracle** , some actions, which need to be performed as `root`, are recorded in a shell script called `root.sh`. This script is written in the `orainst` directory. Apply the following patch to `root.sh`, to have it use to proper location of `chown` or alternatively run the script under a Linux native shell.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    
-*** orainst/root.sh.orig Tue Oct 6 21:57:33 1998\r
-    --- orainst/root.sh Mon Dec 28 15:58:53 1998\r
-    
-***************\r
-    *** 31,37 ****\r
-
-    # This is the default value for CHOWN\r
-    # It will redefined later in this script for those ports\r
-    # which have it conditionally defined in ss_install.h\r
-    ! CHOWN=/bin/chown\r
-    #\r
-    # Define variables to be used in this script\r
-    --- 31,37 ----\r
-    # This is the default value for CHOWN\r
-    # It will redefined later in this script for those ports\r
-    # which have it conditionally defined in ss_install.h\r
-    ! CHOWN=/usr/sbin/chown\r
-    #\r
-    # Define variables to be used in this script\r
-\r
-\r
-When you do not install  **Oracle**  from CD, you can patch the source for `root.sh`. It is called `rthd.sh` and is located in the `orainst` directory in the source tree.\r
-\r
-#### 22.6.4.2 Patching genclntsh \r
-\r
-The script `genclntsh` is used to create a single shared client library. It is used when building the demos. Apply the following patch to comment out the definition of `PATH`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    
-*** bin/genclntsh.orig Wed Sep 30 07:37:19 1998\r
-    --- bin/genclntsh Tue Dec 22 15:36:49 1998\r
-    
-***************\r
-    *** 32,38 ****\r
-
-    #\r
-    # Explicit path to ensure that we're using the correct commands\r
-    #PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/ccs/bin export PATH\r
-    ! PATH=/usr/local/bin:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/X11R6/bin export PATH\r
-    #\r
-    # each product MUST provide a $PRODUCT/admin/shrept.lst\r
-    --- 32,38 ----\r
-    #\r
-    # Explicit path to ensure that we're using the correct commands\r
-    #PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/ccs/bin export PATH\r
-    ! #PATH=/usr/local/bin:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/X11R6/bin export PATH\r
-    #\r
-    # each product MUST provide a $PRODUCT/admin/shrept.lst\r
-\r
-\r
-### 22.6.5 Running Oracle \r
-\r
-When you have followed the instructions, you should be able to run  **Oracle**  as if it was run on Linux itself.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-linuxcompatibility\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-linuxemu.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0161213..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,88 +0,0 @@
-
-
-
-## Chapter 22 Linux Binary Compatibility 
-
-
-
- **Table of Contents** 
-
-
-* 22.1 [Synopsis](linuxemu.html#LINUXEMU-SYNOPSIS)
-
-
-* 22.2 [Installation](handbook-linuxemu-lbc-install.html)
-
-
-* 22.3 [Installing Mathematica®](handbook-linuxemu-mathematica.html)
-
-
-* 22.4 [Installing Maple™](handbook-linuxemu-maple.html)
-
-
-* 22.5 [Installing MATLAB®](handbook-linuxemu-matlab.html)
-
-
-* 22.6 [Installing Oracle®](handbook-linuxemu-oracle.html)
-
-
-* 22.7 [Installing SAP® R/3®](handbook-sapr3.html)
-
-
-* 22.8 [Advanced Topics](handbook-linuxemu-advanced.html)
-
-***Restructured and parts updated by Jim Mock. ******Originally contributed by Brian N. Handy and Rich Murphey. ***
-
-
-
-## 22.1 Synopsis 
-
-
-
-DragonFly provides binary compatibility with several other UNIX® like operating systems, including Linux. At this point, you may be asking yourself why exactly, does DragonFly need to be able to run Linux binaries? The answer to that question is quite simple. Many companies and developers develop only for Linux, since it is the latest ***hot thing*** in the computing world. That leaves the rest of us DragonFly users bugging these same companies and developers to put out native DragonFly versions of their applications. The problem is, that most of these companies do not really realize how many people would use their product if there were DragonFly versions too, and most continue to only develop for Linux. So what is a DragonFly user to do? This is where the Linux binary compatibility of DragonFly comes into play.
-
-
-
-In a nutshell, the compatibility allows DragonFly users to run about 90% of all Linux applications without modification. This includes applications such as ***StarOffice™***, the Linux version of ***Netscape®***, ***Adobe® Acrobat®***, ***RealPlayer®*** 5 and 7, ***VMware™***', ***Oracle®***, ***WordPerfect®***, ***Doom***, ***Quake***, and more. It is also reported that in some situations, Linux binaries perform better on DragonFly than they do under Linux.
-
-
-
-There are, however, some Linux-specific operating system features that are not supported under DragonFly. Linux binaries will not work on DragonFly if they overly use the Linux `/proc` file system (which is different from DragonFly's `/proc` file system), or i386™ specific calls, such as enabling virtual 8086 mode.
-
-
-
-After reading this chapter, you will know:
-
-
-
-
-* How to enable Linux binary compatibility on your system.
-
-
-* How to install additional Linux shared libraries.
-
-
-* How to install Linux applications on your DragonFly system.
-
-
-* The implementation details of Linux compatibility in DragonFly.
-
-
-
-Before reading this chapter, you should:
-
-
-
-
-* Know how to install additional third-party software ([Chapter 4](pkgsrc.html)).
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-CategoryHandbook
-
-Category
-
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-advanced.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-advanced.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 62c1f9e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,98 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 20.6 Advanced Topics \r
-\r
-The following section covers more involved topics such as mail configuration and setting up mail for your entire domain.\r
-\r
-### 20.6.1 Basic Configuration \r
-\r
-Out of the box, you should be able to send email to external hosts as long as you have set up `/etc/resolv.conf` or are running your own name server. If you would like to have mail for your host delivered to the MTA (e.g.,  **sendmail** ) on your own DragonFly host, there are two methods:\r
-\r
-
-* Run your own name server and have your own domain. For example, `dragonflybsd.org`\r
-
-* Get mail delivered directly to your host. This is done by delivering mail directly to the current DNS name for your machine. For example, `example.dragonflybsd.org`.\r
-\r
-Regardless of which of the above you choose, in order to have mail delivered directly to your host, it must have a permanent static IP address (not a dynamic address, as with most PPP dial-up configurations). If you are behind a firewall, it must pass SMTP traffic on to you. If you want to receive mail directly at your host, you need to be sure of either of two things:\r
-\r
-
-* Make sure that the (lowest-numbered) MX record in your DNS points to your host's IP address.\r
-
-* Make sure there is no MX entry in your DNS for your host.\r
-\r
-Either of the above will allow you to receive mail directly at your host.\r
-\r
-Try this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # hostname\r
-    example.dragonflybsd.org\r
-    # host example.dragonflybsd.org\r
-    example.dragonflybsd.org has address 204.216.27.XX\r
-\r
-\r
-If that is what you see, mail directly to `&lt;[mailto:yourlogin@example.dragonflybsd.org yourlogin@example.dragonflybsd.org]&gt;` should work without problems (assuming  **sendmail**  is running correctly on `example.dragonflybsd.org`).\r
-\r
-If instead you see something like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # host example.dragonflybsd.org\r
-    example.dragonflybsd.org has address 204.216.27.XX\r
-    example.dragonflybsd.org mail is handled (pri=10) by hub.dragonflybsd.org\r
-\r
-\r
-All mail sent to your host (`example.dragonflybsd.org`) will end up being collected on `hub` under the same username instead of being sent directly to your host.\r
-\r
-The above information is handled by your DNS server. The DNS record that carries mail routing information is the ***M***ail e***X***change entry. If no MX record exists, mail will be delivered directly to the host by way of its IP address.\r
-\r
-The MX entry for `freefall.FreeBSD.org` at one time looked like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    freefall           MX      30      mail.crl.net\r
-    freefall           MX      40      agora.rdrop.com\r
-    freefall           MX      10      freefall.FreeBSD.org\r
-    freefall           MX      20      who.cdrom.com\r
-\r
-\r
-As you can see, `freefall` had many MX entries. The lowest MX number is the host that receives mail directly if available; if it is not accessible for some reason, the others (sometimes called ***backup MXes***) accept messages temporarily, and pass it along when a lower-numbered host becomes available, eventually to the lowest-numbered host.\r
-\r
-Alternate MX sites should have separate Internet connections from your own in order to be most useful. Your ISP or another friendly site should have no problem providing this service for you.\r
-\r
-### 20.6.2 Mail for Your Domain \r
-\r
-In order to set up a ***mailhost*** (a.k.a. mail server) you need to have any mail sent to various workstations directed to it. Basically, you want to ***claim*** any mail for any hostname in your domain (in this case `*.dragonflybsd.org`) and divert it to your mail server so your users can receive their mail on the master mail server.\r
-\r
-To make life easiest, a user account with the same ***username*** should exist on both machines. Use [adduser(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#adduser&section8) to do this.\r
-\r
-The mailhost you will be using must be the designated mail exchanger for each workstation on the network. This is done in your DNS configuration like so:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    example.dragonflybsd.org   A       204.216.27.XX           ; Workstation\r
-                       MX      10 hub.dragonflybsd.org ; Mailhost\r
-\r
-\r
-This will redirect mail for the workstation to the mailhost no matter where the A record points. The mail is sent to the MX host.\r
-\r
-You cannot do this yourself unless you are running a DNS server. If you are not, or cannot run your own DNS server, talk to your ISP or whoever provides your DNS.\r
-\r
-If you are doing virtual email hosting, the following information will come in handy. For this example, we will assume you have a customer with his own domain, in this case `customer1.org`, and you want all the mail for `customer1.org` sent to your mailhost, `mail.myhost.com`. The entry in your DNS should look like this:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    customer1.org              MX      10      mail.myhost.com\r
-\r
-\r
-You do ***not*** need an A record for `customer1.org` if you only want to handle email for that domain.\r
-\r
- **Note:** Be aware that pinging `customer1.org` will not work unless an A record exists for it.\r
-\r
-The last thing that you must do is tell  **sendmail**  on your mailhost what domains and/or hostnames it should be accepting mail for. There are a few different ways this can be done. Either of the following will work:\r
-\r
-
-* Add the hosts to your `/etc/mail/local-host-names` file if you are using the `FEATURE(use_cw_file)`.\r
-
-* Add a `Cwyour.host.com` line to your `/etc/mail/sendmail.cf`.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-agents.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-agents.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c41168b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,156 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Mail User Agents \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marc Silver. ***\r
-\r
-A Mail User Agent (MUA) is an application that is used to send and receive email. Furthermore, as email ***evolves*** and becomes more complex, MUA's are becoming increasingly powerful in the way they interact with email; this gives users increased functionality and flexibility. DragonFly contains support for numerous mail user agents, all of which can be easily installed using the [pkgsrc®](pkgsrc.html) collection. Users may choose between graphical email clients such as ***evolution*** or ***balsa***, console based clients such as ***mutt***, ***pine*** or `mail`, or the web interfaces used by some large organizations.\r
-\r
-### mail \r
-\r
-[mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1) is the default Mail User Agent (MUA) in DragonFly. It is a console based MUA that offers all the basic functionality required to send and receive text-based email, though it is limited in interaction abilities with attachments and can only support local mailboxes.\r
-\r
-Although `mail` does not natively support interaction with POP or IMAP servers, these mailboxes may be downloaded to a local `mbox` file using an application such as ***fetchmail***, which will be discussed later in [in this Chapter](mail-fetchmail.html).\r
-\r
-In order to send and receive email, simply invoke the `mail` command as per the following example:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % mail\r
-\r
-\r
-The contents of the user mailbox in `/var/mail` are automatically read by the `mail` utility. Should the mailbox be empty, the utility exits with a message indicating that no mails could be found. Once the mailbox has been read, the application interface is started, and a list of messages will be displayed. Messages are automatically numbered, as can be seen in the following example:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    Mail version 8.1 6/6/93.  Type ? for help.\r
-    "/var/mail/marcs": 3 messages 3 new\r
-    &gt;N  1 root@localhost        Mon Mar  8 14:05  14/510   "test"\r
-     N  2 root@localhost        Mon Mar  8 14:05  14/509   "user account"\r
-     N  3 root@localhost        Mon Mar  8 14:05  14/509   "sample"\r
-\r
-\r
-Messages can now be read by using the  **t**  `mail` command, suffixed by the message number that should be displayed. In this example, we will read the first email:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    &amp; t 1\r
-    Message 1:\r
-    From root@localhost  Mon Mar  8 14:05:52 2004\r
-    X-Original-To: marcs@localhost\r
-    Delivered-To: marcs@localhost\r
-    To: marcs@localhost\r
-    Subject: test\r
-    Date: Mon,  8 Mar 2004 14:05:52 +0200 (SAST)\r
-    From: root@localhost (Charlie Root)\r
-    \r
-    This is a test message, please reply if you receive it.\r
-\r
-\r
-As can be seen in the example above, the  **t**  key will cause the message to be displayed with full headers. To display the list of messages again, the  **h**  key should be used.\r
-\r
-If the email requires a response, you may use `mail` to reply, by using either the  **R**  or  **r**  `mail` keys. The  **R**  key instructs `mail` to reply only to the sender of the email, while  **r**  replies not only to the sender, but also to other recipients of the message. You may also suffix these commands with the mail number which you would like make a reply to. Once this has been done, the response should be entered, and the end of the message should be marked by a single  **.**  on a new line. An example can be seen below:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    &amp; R 1\r
-    To: root@localhost\r
-    Subject: Re: test\r
-    \r
-    Thank you, I did get your email.\r
-    .\r
-    EOT\r
-\r
-\r
-In order to send new email, the  **m**  key should be used, followed by the recipient email address. Multiple recipients may also be specified by separating each address with the ***',***' delimiter. The subject of the message may then be entered, followed by the message contents. The end of the message should be specified by putting a single  **.**  on a new line.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    &amp; mail root@localhost\r
-    Subject: I mastered mail\r
-    \r
-    Now I can send and receive email using mail ... :)\r
-    .\r
-    EOT\r
-\r
-\r
-While inside the `mail` utility, the  **?**  command may be used to display help at any time, the [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1) manual page should also be consulted for more help with `mail`.\r
-\r
- **Note:** As previously mentioned, the [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1) command was not originally designed to handle attachments, and thus deals with them very poorly. Newer MUAs such as ***mutt*** handle attachments in a much more intelligent way. But should you still wish to use the `mail` command, the [converters/mpack](http://pkgsrc.se/converters/mpack) port may be of considerable use.\r
-\r
-### mutt \r
-\r
-***mutt*** is a small yet very powerful Mail User Agent, with excellent features, just some of which include:\r
-\r
-
-* The ability to thread messages;\r
-
-* PGP support for digital signing and encryption of email;\r
-
-* MIME Support;\r
-
-* Maildir Support;\r
-
-* Highly customizable.\r
-\r
-All of these features help to make ***mutt*** one of the most advanced mail user agents available. See http://www.mutt.org for more information on ***mutt***.\r
-\r
-The stable version of ***mutt*** may be installed using the [mail/mutt](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/mutt) port, while the current development version may be installed via the [mail/mutt-devel](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/mutt-devel) port. After the port has been installed, ***mutt*** can be started by issuing the following command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % mutt\r
-\r
-\r
-***mutt*** will automatically read the contents of the user mailbox in `/var/mail` and display the contents if applicable. If no mails are found in the user mailbox, then ***mutt*** will wait for commands from the user. The example below shows ***mutt*** displaying a list of messages:\r
-\r
-mail/mutt1.png\r
-\r
-In order to read an email, simply select it using the cursor keys, and press the  **Enter**  key. An example of  **mutt**  displaying email can be seen below:\r
-\r
-mail/mutt2.png\r
-\r
-As with the [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1) command,  **mutt**  allows users to reply only to the sender of the message as well as to all recipients. To reply only to the sender of the email, use the  **r**  keyboard shortcut. To send a group reply, which will be sent to the original sender as well as all the message recipients, use the  **g**  shortcut.\r
-\r
- **Note:**  **mutt**  makes use of the [vi(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vi&section1) command as an editor for creating and replying to emails. This may be customized by the user by creating or editing their own `.muttrc` file in their home directory and setting the `editor` variable.\r
-\r
-In order to compose a new mail message, press  **m** . After a valid subject has been given,  **mutt**  will start [vi(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vi&section1) and the mail can be written. Once the contents of the mail are complete, save and quit from `vi` and  **mutt**  will resume, displaying a summary screen of the mail that is to be delivered. In order to send the mail, press  **y** . An example of the summary screen can be seen below:\r
-\r
-mail/mutt3.png\r
-\r
- **mutt**  also contains extensive help, which can be accessed from most of the menus by pressing the  **?**  key. The top line also displays the keyboard shortcuts where appropriate.\r
-\r
-### pine \r
-\r
- **pine**  is aimed at a beginner user, but also includes some advanced features.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** The  **pine**  software has had several remote vulnerabilities discovered in the past, which allowed remote attackers to execute arbitrary code as users on the local system, by the action of sending a specially-prepared email. All such ***known*** problems have been fixed, but the  **pine**  code is written in a very insecure style and the DragonFly Security Officer believes there are likely to be other undiscovered vulnerabilities. You install  **pine**  at your own risk.\r
-\r
-The current version of  **pine**  may be installed using the [`mail/pine4`](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/pine4) port. Once the port has installed,  **pine**  can be started by issuing the following command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    pine\r
-\r
-\r
-The first time that  **pine**  is run it displays a greeting page with a brief introduction, as well as a request from the  **pine**  development team to send an anonymous email message allowing them to judge how many users are using their client. To send this anonymous message, press  **Enter** , or alternatively press  **E**  to exit the greeting without sending an anonymous message. An example of the greeting page can be seen below:\r
-\r
-mail/pine1.png\r
-\r
-Users are then presented with the main menu, which can be easily navigated using the cursor keys. This main menu provides shortcuts for the composing new mails, browsing of mail directories, and even the administration of address book entries. Below the main menu, relevant keyboard shortcuts to perform functions specific to the task at hand are shown.\r
-\r
-The default directory opened by  **pine**  is the `inbox`. To view the message index, press  **I** , or select the MESSAGE INDEX option as seen below:\r
-\r
-mail/pine2.png\r
-\r
-The message index shows messages in the current directory, and can be navigated by using the cursor keys. Highlighted messages can be read by pressing the  **Enter**  key.\r
-\r
-mail/pine3.png\r
-\r
-In the screenshot below, a sample message is displayed by  **pine** . Keyboard shortcuts are displayed as a reference at the bottom of the screen. An example of one of these shortcuts is the  **r**  key, which tells the MUA to reply to the current message being displayed.\r
-\r
-mail/pine4.png\r
-\r
-Replying to an email in  **pine**  is done using the  **pico**  editor, which is installed by default with  **pine** . The  **pico**  utility makes it easy to navigate around the message and is slightly more forgiving on novice users than [vi(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#vi&section1) or [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=mail&section=1). Once the reply is complete, the message can be sent by pressing  **Ctrl** + **X** . The  **pine**  application will ask for confirmation.\r
-\r
-mail/pine5.png\r
-\r
-The  **pine**  application can be customized using the SETUP option from the main menu. Consult http://www.washington.edu/pine/ for more information.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-changingmta.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-changingmta.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 446b967..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,88 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 20.4 Changing Your Mail Transfer Agent \r
-\r
-***Written by Andrew Boothman. ******Information taken from e-mails written by Gregory Neil Shapiro. ***\r
-\r
-As already mentioned, DragonFly comes with  **sendmail**  already installed as your MTA (Mail Transfer Agent). Therefore by default it is in charge of your outgoing and incoming mail.\r
-\r
-However, for a variety of reasons, some system administrators want to change their system's MTA. These reasons range from simply wanting to try out another MTA to needing a specific feature or package which relies on another mailer. Fortunately, whatever the reason, DragonFly makes it easy to make the change.\r
-\r
-### 20.4.1 Install a New MTA \r
-\r
-You have a wide choice of MTAs available. A good starting point is the [pkgsrc.html pkgsrc® collection]or where you will be able to find many. Of course you are free to use any MTA you want from any location, as long as you can make it run under DragonFly.\r
-\r
-Start by installing your new MTA. Once it is installed it gives you a chance to decide if it really fulfills your needs, and also gives you the opportunity to configure your new software before getting it to take over from  **sendmail** . When doing this, you should be sure that installing the new software will not attempt to overwrite system binaries such as `/usr/bin/sendmail`. Otherwise, your new mail software has essentially been put into service before you have configured it.\r
-\r
-Please refer to your chosen MTA's documentation for information on how to configure the software you have chosen.\r
-\r
-### 20.4.2 Disable  **sendmail**  \r
-\r
-In order to completely disable  **sendmail**  you must use\r
-\r
-    \r
-    sendmail_enable="NONE"\r
-\r
-\r
-in `/etc/rc.conf.`\r
-\r
- **Warning:** If you disable  **sendmail** 's outgoing mail service in this way, it is important that you replace it with a fully working alternative mail delivery system. If you choose not to, system functions such as [periodic(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#periodic&section8) will be unable to deliver their results by e-mail as they would normally expect to. Many parts of your system may expect to have a functional  **sendmail** -compatible system. If applications continue to use  **sendmail** 's binaries to try to send e-mail after you have disabled them, mail could go into an inactive  **sendmail**  queue, and never be delivered.\r
-\r
-If you only want to disable  **sendmail** 's incoming mail service, you should set\r
-\r
-    \r
-    sendmail_enable="NO"\r
-\r
-\r
-in `/etc/rc.conf`. More information on  **sendmail** 's startup options is available from the [rc.sendmail(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#rc.sendmail&section8) manual page.\r
-\r
-### 20.4.3 Running Your New MTA on Boot \r
-\r
-You may have a choice of two methods for running your new MTA on boot, again depending on what version of DragonFly you are running.\r
-\r
-With later versions of DragonFly, you can use the above method or you can set\r
-\r
-    \r
-    mta_start_script="filename"\r
-\r
-\r
-in `/etc/rc.conf`, where `***filename***` is the name of some script that you want executed at boot to start your MTA.\r
-\r
-### 20.4.4 Replacing  **sendmail**  as the System's Default Mailer \r
-\r
-The program  **sendmail**  is so ubiquitous as standard software on UNIX® systems that some software just assumes it is already installed and configured. For this reason, many alternative MTA's provide their own compatible implementations of the  **sendmail**  command-line interface; this facilitates using them as ***drop-in*** replacements for  **sendmail** .\r
-\r
-Therefore, if you are using an alternative mailer, you will need to make sure that software trying to execute standard  **sendmail**  binaries such as `/usr/bin/sendmail` actually executes your chosen mailer instead. Fortunately, DragonFly provides a system called [mailwrapper(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mailwrapper&section8) that does this job for you.\r
-\r
-When  **sendmail**  is operating as installed, you will find something like the following in `/etc/mail/mailer.conf`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    sendmail    /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-    send-mail  /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-    mailq              /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-    newaliases /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-    hoststat   /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-    purgestat  /usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail\r
-\r
-\r
-This means that when any of these common commands (such as `sendmail` itself) are run, the system actually invokes a copy of mailwrapper named `sendmail`, which checks `mailer.conf` and executes `/usr/libexec/sendmail/sendmail` instead. This system makes it easy to change what binaries are actually executed when these default `sendmail` functions are invoked.\r
-\r
-Therefore if you wanted `/usr/local/supermailer/bin/sendmail-compat` to be run instead of  **sendmail** , you could change `/etc/mail/mailer.conf` to read:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    sendmail    /usr/local/supermailer/bin/sendmail-compat\r
-    send-mail  /usr/local/supermailer/bin/sendmail-compat\r
-    mailq              /usr/local/supermailer/bin/mailq-compat\r
-    newaliases /usr/local/supermailer/bin/newaliases-compat\r
-    hoststat   /usr/local/supermailer/bin/hoststat-compat\r
-    purgestat  /usr/local/supermailer/bin/purgestat-compat\r
-\r
-\r
-### 20.4.5 Finishing \r
-\r
-Once you have everything configured the way you want it, you should either kill the  **sendmail**  processes that you no longer need and start the processes belonging to your new software, or simply reboot. Rebooting will also give you the opportunity to ensure that you have correctly configured your system to start your new MTA automatically on boot.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-fetchmail.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-fetchmail.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0199cc6..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,51 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Using fetchmail \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marc Silver. ***\r
-\r
-***fetchmail*** is a full-featured IMAP and POP client which allows users to automatically download mail from remote IMAP and POP servers and save it into local mailboxes; there it can be accessed more easily. ***fetchmail*** can be installed using the [mail/fetchmail](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/fetchmail) port, and offers various features, some of which include:\r
-\r
-
-* Support of POP3, APOP, KPOP, IMAP, ETRN and ODMR protocols.\r
-
-* Ability to forward mail using SMTP, which allows filtering, forwarding, and aliasing to function normally.\r
-
-* May be run in daemon mode to check periodically for new messages.\r
-
-* Can retrieve multiple mailboxes and forward them based on configuration, to different local users.\r
-\r
-While it is outside the scope of this document to explain all of ***fetchmail*** 's features, some basic features will be explained. The ***fetchmail*** utility requires a configuration file known as `.fetchmailrc`, in order to run correctly. This file includes server information as well as login credentials. Due to the sensitive nature of the contents of this file, it is advisable to make it readable only by the owner, with the following command:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % chmod 600 .fetchmailrc\r
-\r
-\r
-The following `.fetchmailrc` serves as an example for downloading a single user mailbox using POP. It tells ***fetchmail*** to connect to `example.com` using a username of `joesoap` and a password of `XXX`. This example assumes that the user `joesoap` is also a user on the local system.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    poll example.com protocol pop3 username "joesoap" password "XXX"\r
-\r
-\r
-The next example connects to multiple POP and IMAP servers and redirects to different local usernames where applicable:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    poll example.com proto pop3:\r
-    user "joesoap", with password "XXX", is "jsoap" here;\r
-    user "andrea", with password "XXXX";\r
-    poll example2.net proto imap:\r
-    user "john", with password "XXXXX", is "myth" here;\r
-\r
-\r
-The ***fetchmail*** utility can be run in daemon mode by running it with the `-d` flag, followed by the interval (in seconds) that ***fetchmail*** should poll servers listed in the `.fetchmailrc` file. The following example would cause ***fetchmail*** to poll every 60 seconds:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % fetchmail -d 60\r
-\r
-\r
-More information on ***fetchmail*** can be found at http://www.catb.org/~esr/fetchmail/.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-procmail.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-procmail.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 767e178..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,68 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Using procmail \r
-\r
-***Contributed by Marc Silver. ***\r
-\r
-The ***procmail*** utility is an incredibly powerful application used to filter incoming mail. It allows users to define ***rules*** which can be matched to incoming mails to perform specific functions or to reroute mail to alternative mailboxes and/or email addresses.  **procmail**  can be installed using the [mail/procmail](http://pkgsrc.se/mail/procmail) port. Once installed, it can be directly integrated into most MTAs; consult your MTA documentation for more information. Alternatively,  **procmail**  can be integrated by adding the following line to a `.forward` in the home directory of the user utilizing  **procmail**  features:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    "|exec /usr/local/bin/procmail || exit 75"\r
-\r
-\r
-The following section will display some basic  **procmail**  rules, as well as brief descriptions on what they do. These rules, and others must be inserted into a `.procmailrc` file, which must reside in the user's home directory.\r
-\r
-Forward all mail from `user@example.com` to an external address of `goodmail@example2.com`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    :0\r
-    
-* ^From.*user@example.com\r
-    ! goodmail@example2.com\r
-\r
-\r
-Forward all mails shorter than 1000 bytes to an external address of `goodmail@example2.com`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    :0\r
-    
-* < 1000\r
-    ! goodmail@example2.com\r
-\r
-\r
-Send all mail sent to `alternate@example.com` into a mailbox called `alternate`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    :0\r
-    
-* ^TOalternate@example.com\r
-    alternate\r
-\r
-\r
-Send all mail with a subject of ***Spam*** to `/dev/null`:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    :0\r
-    ^Subject:.*Spam\r
-    /dev/null\r
-\r
-\r
-A useful recipe that parses incoming `dragonflybsd.org` mailing lists and places each list in its own mailbox:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    :0\r
-    
-* ^List-Post: &lt;mailto:\/[^@]+\r
-    {\r
-       LISTNAME=${MATCH}\r
-       :0\r
-    
-* LISTNAME??^\/[^-]+\r
-       DragonFly-${MATCH}\r
-    }\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-trouble.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-trouble.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c6b8533..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,138 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 20.5 Troubleshooting \r
-\r
-20.5.1. [mail-trouble.html#Q20.5.1. Why do I have to use the FQDN for hosts on my site?]:: 20.5.2. [mail-trouble.html#Q20.5.2.  **sendmail**  says ***`mail loops back to myself`***]:: 20.5.3. [mail-trouble.html#Q20.5.3. How can I run a mail server on a dial-up PPP host?]:: 20.5.4. [mail-trouble.html#Q20.5.4. Why do I keep getting ***`Relaying Denied`*** errors when sending mail from other hosts?]::\r
-\r
- **20.5.1.** Why do I have to use the FQDN for hosts on my site?\r
-\r
- **** You will probably find that the host is actually in a different domain; for example, if you are in `foo.bar.edu` and you wish to reach a host called `mumble` in the `bar.edu` domain, you will have to refer to it by the fully-qualified domain name, `mumble.bar.edu`, instead of just `mumble`.\r
-\r
-Traditionally, this was allowed by BSD BIND resolvers. However the current version of  **BIND**  that ships with DragonFly no longer provides default abbreviations for non-fully qualified domain names other than the domain you are in. So an unqualified host `mumble` must either be found as `mumble.foo.bar.edu`, or it will be searched for in the root domain.\r
-\r
-This is different from the previous behavior, where the search continued across `mumble.bar.edu`, and `mumble.edu`. Have a look at RFC 1535 for why this was considered bad practice, or even a security hole.\r
-\r
-As a good workaround, you can place the line:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    search foo.bar.edu bar.edu\r
-\r
-\r
- instead of the previous:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    domain foo.bar.edu\r
-\r
-\r
- into your `/etc/resolv.conf`. However, make sure that the search order does not go beyond the ***boundary between local and public administration***, as RFC 1535 calls it.\r
-\r
- **20.5.2.**  **sendmail**  says ***`mail loops back to myself`***\r
-\r
- **** This is answered in the  **sendmail**  FAQ as follows:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    I'm getting these error messages:\r
-    \r
-    553 MX list for domain.net points back to relay.domain.net\r
-    554 &lt;user@domain.net&gt;... Local configuration error\r
-    \r
-    How can I solve this problem?\r
-    \r
-    You have asked mail to the domain (e.g., domain.net) to be\r
-    forwarded to a specific host (in this case, relay.domain.net)\r
-    by using an MX record, but the relay machine does not recognize\r
-    itself as domain.net. Add domain.net to /etc/mail/local-host-names\r
-    [known as /etc/sendmail.cw prior to version 8.10]\r
-    (if you are using FEATURE(use_cw_file)) or add ***Cw domain.net***\r
-    to /etc/mail/sendmail.cf.\r
-\r
-\r
-The  **sendmail**  FAQ can be found at http://www.sendmail.org/faq/ and is recommended reading if you want to do any ***tweaking*** of your mail setup.\r
-\r
-***'20.5.3. ***'How can I run a mail server on a dial-up PPP host?\r
-\r
- **** You want to connect a DragonFly box on a LAN to the Internet. The DragonFly box will be a mail gateway for the LAN. The PPP connection is non-dedicated.\r
-\r
-There are at least two ways to do this. One way is to use UUCP.\r
-\r
-Another way is to get a full-time Internet server to provide secondary MX services for your domain. For example, if your company's domain is `example.com` and your Internet service provider has set `example.net` up to provide secondary MX services to your domain:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    example.com.          MX        10      example.com.\r
-                          MX        20      example.net.\r
-\r
-\r
-Only one host should be specified as the final recipient (add `Cw example.com` in `/etc/mail/sendmail.cf` on `example.com`).\r
-\r
-When the sending `sendmail` is trying to deliver the mail it will try to connect to you (`example.com`) over the modem link. It will most likely time out because you are not online. The program  **sendmail**  will automatically deliver it to the secondary MX site, i.e. your Internet provider (`example.net`). The secondary MX site will then periodically try to connect to your host and deliver the mail to the primary MX host (`example.com`).\r
-\r
-You might want to use something like this as a login script:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    #!/bin/sh\r
-    # Put me in /usr/local/bin/pppmyisp\r
-    ( sleep 60 ; /usr/sbin/sendmail -q ) &amp;\r
-    /usr/sbin/ppp -direct pppmyisp\r
-\r
-\r
-If you are going to create a separate login script for a user you could use `sendmail -qRexample.com` instead in the script above. This will force all mail in your queue for `example.com` to be processed immediately.\r
-\r
-A further refinement of the situation is as follows:\r
-\r
-Message stolen from the [FreeBSD Internet service provider's mailing list](http://lists.FreeBSD.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-isp).\r
-\r
-    \r
-    &gt; we provide the secondary MX for a customer. The customer connects to\r
-    &gt; our services several times a day automatically to get the mails to\r
-    &gt; his primary MX (We do not call his site when a mail for his domains\r
-    &gt; arrived). Our sendmail sends the mailqueue every 30 minutes. At the\r
-    &gt; moment he has to stay 30 minutes online to be sure that all mail is\r
-    &gt; gone to the primary MX.\r
-    &gt;\r
-    &gt; Is there a command that would initiate sendmail to send all the mails\r
-    &gt; now? The user has not root-privileges on our machine of course.\r
-    \r
-    In the ***privacy flags*** section of sendmail.cf, there is a\r
-    definition Opgoaway,restrictqrun\r
-    \r
-    Remove restrictqrun to allow non-root users to start the queue processing.\r
-    You might also like to rearrange the MXs. We are the 1st MX for our\r
-    customers like this, and we have defined:\r
-    \r
-    # If we are the best MX for a host, try directly instead of generating\r
-    # local config error.\r
-    OwTrue\r
-    \r
-    That way a remote site will deliver straight to you, without trying\r
-    the customer connection.  You then send to your customer.  Only works for\r
-    ***hosts***, so you need to get your customer to name their mail\r
-    machine ***customer.com*** as well as\r
-    ***hostname.customer.com*** in the DNS.  Just put an A record in\r
-    the DNS for ***customer.com***.\r
-\r
-\r
- **20.5.4.** Why do I keep getting ***`Relaying Denied`*** errors when sending mail from other hosts?\r
-\r
- **** In default DragonFly installations,  **sendmail**  is configured to only send mail from the host it is running on. For example, if a POP server is available, then users will be able to check mail from school, work, or other remote locations but they still will not be able to send outgoing emails from outside locations. Typically, a few moments after the attempt, an email will be sent from  **MAILER-DAEMON**  with a ***`5.7 Relaying Denied`*** error message.\r
-\r
-There are several ways to get around this. The most straightforward solution is to put your ISP's address in a relay-domains file at `/etc/mail/relay-domains`. A quick way to do this would be:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # echo "your.isp.example.com" &gt; /etc/mail/relay-domains\r
-\r
-\r
-After creating or editing this file you must restart  **sendmail** . This works great if you are a server administrator and do not wish to send mail locally, or would like to use a point and click client/system on another machine or even another ISP. It is also very useful if you only have one or two email accounts set up. If there is a large number of addresses to add, you can simply open this file in your favorite text editor and then add the domains, one per line:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    your.isp.example.com\r
-    other.isp.example.net\r
-    users-isp.example.org\r
-    www.example.org\r
-\r
-\r
-Now any mail sent through your system, by any host in this list (provided the user has an account on your system), will succeed. This is a very nice way to allow users to send mail from your system remotely without allowing people to send SPAM through your system.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-using.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail-using.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 71fd45b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,81 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 20.2 Using Electronic Mail \r
-\r
-There are five major parts involved in an email exchange. They are: [mail-using.html#MAIL-MUA the user program], [mail-using.html#MAIL-MTA the server daemon], [mail-using.html#MAIL-DNS DNS], [mail-using.html#MAIL-RECEIVE a remote or local mailbox], and of course, [mail-using.html#MAIL-HOST the mailhost itself].\r
-\r
-### 20.2.1 The User Program \r
-\r
-This includes command line programs such as  **mutt** ,  **pine** ,  **elm** , and `mail`, and GUI programs such as  **balsa** ,  **xfmail**  to name a few, and something more ***sophisticated*** like a WWW browser. These programs simply pass off the email transactions to the local [mail-using.html#MAIL-HOST ***mailhost***], either by calling one of the [mail-using.html#MAIL-MTA server daemons] available, or delivering it over TCP.\r
-\r
-### 20.2.2 Mailhost Server Daemon \r
-\r
-DragonFly ships with  **sendmail**  by default, but also support numerous other mail server daemons, just some of which include:\r
-\r
-
-*  **exim** ;\r
-
-*  **postfix** ;\r
-
-*  **qmail** .\r
-\r
-The server daemon usually has two functions--it is responsible for receiving incoming mail as well as delivering outgoing mail. It is ***not*** responsible for the collection of mail using protocols such as POP or IMAP to read your email, nor does it allow connecting to local `mbox` or Maildir mailboxes. You may require an additional [mail-using.html#MAIL-RECEIVE daemon] for that.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** Older versions of  **sendmail**  have some serious security issues which may result in an attacker gaining local and/or remote access to your machine. Make sure that you are running a current version to avoid these problems. Optionally, install an alternative MTA from the [pkgsrc.html DragonFly Pkgsrc Collection].\r
-\r
-### 20.2.3 Email and DNS \r
-\r
-The Domain Name System (DNS) and its daemon `named` play a large role in the delivery of email. In order to deliver mail from your site to another, the server daemon will look up the remote site in the DNS to determine the host that will receive mail for the destination. This process also occurs when mail is sent from a remote host to your mail server.\r
-\r
-DNS is responsible for mapping hostnames to IP addresses, as well as for storing information specific to mail delivery, known as MX records. The MX (Mail eXchanger) record specifies which host, or hosts, will receive mail for a particular domain. If you do not have an MX record for your hostname or domain, the mail will be delivered directly to your host provided you have an A record pointing your hostname to your IP address.\r
-\r
-You may view the MX records for any domain by using the [host(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#host&section1) command, as seen in the example below:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % host -t mx DragonflyBSD.org\r
-    DragonflyBSD.org mail is handled (pri=10) by crater.dragonflybsd.org\r
-\r
-\r
-### 20.2.4 Receiving Mail \r
-\r
-Receiving mail for your domain is done by the mail host. It will collect all mail sent to your domain and store it either in `mbox` (the default method for storing mail) or Maildir format, depending on your configuration. Once mail has been stored, it may either be read locally using applications such as [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1) or  **mutt** , or remotely accessed and collected using protocols such as POP or IMAP. This means that should you only wish to read mail locally, you are not required to install a POP or IMAP server.\r
-\r
-#### 20.2.4.1 Accessing remote mailboxes using POP and IMAP \r
-\r
-In order to access mailboxes remotely, you are required to have access to a POP or IMAP server. These protocols allow users to connect to their mailboxes from remote locations with ease. Though both POP and IMAP allow users to remotely access mailboxes, IMAP offers many advantages, some of which are:\r
-\r
-
-* IMAP can store messages on a remote server as well as fetch them.\r
-
-* IMAP supports concurrent updates.\r
-
-* IMAP can be extremely useful over low-speed links as it allows users to fetch the structure of messages without downloading them; it can also perform tasks such as searching on the server in order to minimize data transfer between clients and servers.\r
-\r
-In order to install a POP or IMAP server, the following steps should be performed:\r
-\r
-  1. Choose an IMAP or POP server that best suits your needs. The following POP and IMAP servers are well known and serve as some good examples:\r
-
-*  **qpopper** ;\r
-
-*  **teapop** ;\r
-
-*  **imap-uw** ;\r
-
-*  **courier-imap** ;\r
-  1. Install the POP or IMAP daemon of your choosing from the ports collection.\r
-  1. Where required, modify `/etc/inetd.conf` to load the POP or IMAP server.\r
-\r
- **Warning:** It should be noted that both POP and IMAP transmit information, including username and password credentials in clear-text. This means that if you wish to secure the transmission of information across these protocols, you should consider tunneling sessions over [ssh(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#ssh&section1&manpath=OpenBSD+3.3). Tunneling sessions is described in [ Section 10.10.7](openssh.html#SECURITY-SSH-TUNNELING).\r
-\r
-#### 20.2.4.2 Accessing local mailboxes \r
-\r
-Mailboxes may be accessed locally by directly utilizing MUAs on the server on which the mailbox resides. This can be done using applications such as  **mutt**  or [mail(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mail&section1).\r
-\r
-### 20.2.5 The Mail Host \r
-\r
-The mail host is the name given to a server that is responsible for delivering and receiving mail for your host, and possibly your network.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-CategoryHandbook-email\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mail.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mail.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 5c98e19..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,79 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 20 Electronic Mail \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 20.1 [ Synopsis](mail.html#MAIL-SYNOPSIS)\r
-
-* 20.2 [Using Electronic Mail](mail-using.html)\r
-
-* 20.3 [Sendmail Configuration](sendmail.html)\r
-
-* 20.4 [Changing Your Mail Transfer Agent](mail-changingmta.html)\r
-
-* 20.5 [Troubleshooting](mail-trouble.html)\r
-
-* 20.6 [Advanced Topics](mail-advanced.html)\r
-
-* 20.7 [SMTP with UUCP](smtp-uucp.html)\r
-
-* 20.8 [Setting up to send only](outgoing-only.html)\r
-
-* 20.9 [Using Mail with a Dialup Connection](smtp-dialup.html)\r
-
-* 20.10 [SMTP Authentication](smtp-auth.html)\r
-
-* 20.11 [Mail User Agents](mail-agents.html)\r
-
-* 20.12 [Using fetchmail](mail-fetchmail.html)\r
-
-* 20.13 [Using procmail](mail-procmail.html)\r
-***Original work by Bill Lloyd. Rewritten by Jim Mock. ***\r
-\r
-## 20.1 Synopsis \r
-\r
-***Electronic Mail***, better known as email, is one of the most widely used forms of communication today. This chapter provides a basic introduction to running a mail server on DragonFly, as well as an introduction to sending and receiving email using DragonFly; however, it is not a complete reference and in fact many important considerations are omitted. For more complete coverage of the subject, the reader is referred to the many excellent books listed in [Appendix B](bibliography.html).\r
-\r
-After reading this chapter, you will know:\r
-\r
-
-* What software components are involved in sending and receiving electronic mail.\r
-
-* Where basic sendmail configuration files are located in DragonFly.\r
-
-* The difference between remote and local mailboxes.\r
-
-* How to block spammers from illegally using your mail server as a relay.\r
-
-* How to install and configure an alternate Mail Transfer Agent on your system, replacing sendmail.\r
-
-* How to troubleshoot common mail server problems.\r
-
-* How to use SMTP with UUCP.\r
-
-* How to set up the system to send mail only.\r
-
-* How to use mail with a dialup connection.\r
-
-* How to configure SMTP Authentication for added security.\r
-
-* How to install and use a Mail User Agent, such as mutt to send and receive email.\r
-
-* How to download your mail from a remote POP or IMAP server.\r
-
-* How to automatically apply filters and rules to incoming email.\r
-\r
-Before reading this chapter, you should:\r
-\r
-
-* Properly set up your network connection ([Chapter 19](advanced-networking.html)).\r
-
-* Properly set up the DNS information for your mail host ([Chapter 19](advanced-networking.html)).\r
-
-* Know how to install additional third-party software ([Chapter 4](pkgsrc.html)).\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors-ftp.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors-ftp.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 744e22b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,3 +0,0 @@
-## FTP mirrors
-
-This page is outdated. Please update your links to point to: [DragonFly download sites](/mirrors/).
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-mirrors.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4ecd034..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,6 +0,0 @@
-
-## Obtaining DragonFly via commercial vendors
-
-
-
-A number of commercial sites selling DragonFly related material is [[here|commercial/]].
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-multimedia.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-multimedia.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index c0507fb..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,57 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## Chapter 16 Multimedia \r
-\r
- **Table of Contents** \r
-
-* 16.1 [ Synopsis](multimedia.html#MULTIMEDIA-SYNOPSIS)\r
-
-* 16.2 [Setting Up the Sound Card](sound-setup.html)\r
-
-* 16.3 [MP3 Audio](sound-mp3.html)\r
-
-* 16.4 [Video Playback](video-playback.html)\r
-
-* 16.5 [Setting Up TV Cards](tvcard.html)\r
-***Edited by Ross Lippert. ***\r
-\r
-## 16.1 Synopsis \r
-\r
-DragonFly supports a wide variety of sound cards, allowing you to enjoy high fidelity output from your computer. This includes the ability to record and playback audio in the MPEG Audio Layer 3 (MP3), WAV, and Ogg Vorbis formats as well as many other formats. The pkgsrc® tree also contain applications allowing you to edit your recorded audio, add sound effects, and control attached MIDI devices.\r
-\r
-With some willingness to experiment, DragonFly can support playback of video files and DVD's. The number of applications to encode, convert, and playback various video media is more limited than the number of sound applications. For example as of this writing, there is no good re-encoding application in the pkgsrc tree, which could be use to convert between formats, as there is with [audio/sox](http://pkgsrc.se/audio/sox). However, the software landscape in this area is changing rapidly.\r
-\r
-This chapter will describe the necessary steps to configure your sound card. The configuration and installation of X11 ([Chapter 5](x11.html)) has already taken care of the hardware issues for your video card, though there may be some tweaks to apply for better playback.\r
-\r
-After reading this chapter, you will know:\r
-\r
-
-* How to configure your system so that your sound card is recognized.\r
-
-* Methods to test that your card is working using sample applications.\r
-
-* How to troubleshoot your sound setup.\r
-
-* How to playback and encode MP3s and other audio.\r
-
-* How video is supported by the X server.\r
-
-* Some video player/encoder ports which give good results.\r
-
-* How to playback DVD's, `.mpg` and `.avi` files.\r
-
-* How to rip CD and DVD information into files.\r
-
-* How to configure a TV card.\r
-\r
-Before reading this chapter, you should:\r
-\r
-
-* Know how to configure and install a new kernel ([Chapter 9](kernelconfig.html)).\r
-\r
- **Warning:** Trying to mount audio CDs with the [mount(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#mount&section8) command will result in an error, at least, and a ***kernel panic***, at worst. These media have specialized encodings which differ from the usual ISO-filesystem.\r
-\r
-\r
-\r
-CategoryHandbook\r
-Category\r
diff --git a/docs/handbook/handbook-network-bluetooth.mdwn b/docs/handbook/handbook-network-bluetooth.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 65634ff..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,333 +0,0 @@
-\r
-\r
-## 19.4 Bluetooth \r
-\r
-***Written by Pav Lucistnik. ***\r
-\r
-### 19.4.1 Introduction \r
-\r
-Bluetooth is a wireless technology for creating personal networks operating in the 2.4 GHz unlicensed band, with a range of 10 meters. Networks are usually formed ad-hoc from portable devices such as cellular phones, handhelds and laptops. Unlike the other popular wireless technology, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth offers higher level service profiles, e.g. FTP-like file servers, file pushing, voice transport, serial line emulation, and more.\r
-\r
-The Bluetooth stack in DragonFly is implemented using the Netgraph framework (see [netgraph(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#netgraph&section4)). A broad variety of Bluetooth USB dongles is supported by the [ng_ubt(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ng_ubt&section=4) driver. The Broadcom BCM2033 chip based Bluetooth devices are supported via the [ubtbcmfw(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ubtbcmfw&section=4) and [ng_ubt(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ng_ubt&section=4) drivers. The 3Com Bluetooth PC Card 3CRWB60-A is supported by the [ng_bt3c(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ng_bt3c&section=4) driver. Serial and UART based Bluetooth devices are supported via [sio(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=sio&section=4), [ng_h4(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=ng_h4&section=4) and [hcseriald(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=hcseriald&section=8). This chapter describes the use of the USB Bluetooth dongle. Bluetooth support is available in DragonFly 5.0 and newer systems.\r
-\r
-### 19.4.2 Plugging in the Device \r
-\r
-By default Bluetooth device drivers are available as kernel modules. Before attaching a device, you will need to load the driver into the kernel.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # kldload ng_ubt\r
-\r
-\r
-If the Bluetooth device is present in the system during system startup, load the module from `/boot/loader.conf`.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ng_ubt_load="YES"\r
-\r
-\r
-Plug in your USB dongle. The output similar to the following will appear on the console (or in syslog).\r
-\r
-    \r
-    ubt0: vendor 0x0a12 product 0x0001, rev 1.10/5.25, addr 2\r
-    ubt0: Interface 0 endpoints: interrupt#0x81, bulk-in0x82, bulk-out=0x2\r
-    ubt0: Interface 1 (alt.config 5) endpoints: isoc-in#0x83, isoc-out0x3,\r
-          wMaxPacketSize#49, nframes6, buffer size=294\r
-\r
-\r
-Copy `/usr/share/examples/netgraph/bluetooth/rc.bluetooth` into some convenient place, like `/etc/rc.bluetooth`. This script is used to start and stop the Bluetooth stack. It is a good idea to stop the stack before unplugging the device, but it is not (usually) fatal. When starting the stack, you will receive output similar to the following:\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # /etc/rc.bluetooth start ubt0\r
-    BD_ADDR: 00:02:72:00:d4:1a\r
-    Features: 0xff 0xff 0xf 00 00 00 00 00\r
-    &lt;3-Slot&gt; &lt;5-Slot&gt; &lt;Encryption&gt; &lt;Slot offset&gt;\r
-    &lt;Timing accuracy&gt; &lt;Switch&gt; &lt;Hold mode&gt; &lt;Sniff mode&gt;\r
-    &lt;Park mode&gt; &lt;RSSI&gt; &lt;Channel quality&gt; &lt;SCO link&gt;\r
-    &lt;HV2 packets&gt; &lt;HV3 packets&gt; &lt;u-law log&gt; &lt;A-law log&gt; &lt;CVSD&gt;\r
-    &lt;Paging scheme&gt; &lt;Power control&gt; &lt;Transparent SCO data&gt;\r
-    Max. ACL packet size: 192 bytes\r
-    Number of ACL packets: 8\r
-    Max. SCO packet size: 64 bytes\r
-    Number of SCO packets: 8\r
-\r
-\r
-### 19.4.3 Host Controller Interface (HCI) \r
-\r
-Host Controller Interface (HCI) provides a command interface to the baseband controller and link manager, and access to hardware status and control registers. This interface provides a uniform method of accessing the Bluetooth baseband capabilities. HCI layer on the Host exchanges data and commands with the HCI firmware on the Bluetooth hardware. The Host Controller Transport Layer (i.e. physical bus) driver provides both HCI layers with the ability to exchange information with each other.\r
-\r
-A single Netgraph node of type ***hci*** is created for a single Bluetooth device. The HCI node is normally connected to the Bluetooth device driver node (downstream) and the L2CAP node (upstream). All HCI operations must be performed on the HCI node and not on the device driver node. Default name for the HCI node is ***devicehci***. For more details refer to the [ng_hci(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#ng_hci&section4) man page.\r
-\r
-One of the most common tasks is discovery of Bluetooth devices in RF proximity. This operation is called ***inquiry***. Inquiry and other HCI realated operations are done with the [hccontrol(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#hccontrol&section8) utility. The example below shows how to find out which Bluetooth devices are in range. You should receive the list of devices in a few seconds. Note that a remote device will only answer the inquiry if it put into ***discoverable*** mode.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % hccontrol -n ubt0hci inquiry\r
-    Inquiry result, num_responses=1\r
-    Inquiry result #0\r
-           BD_ADDR: 00:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-           Page Scan Rep. Mode: 0x1\r
-           Page Scan Period Mode: 00\r
-           Page Scan Mode: 00\r
-           Class: 52:02:04\r
-           Clock offset: 0x78ef\r
-    Inquiry complete. Status: No error [00]\r
-\r
-\r
-`BD_ADDR` is unique address of a Bluetooth device, similar to MAC addresses of a network card. This address is needed for further communication with a device. It is possible to assign human readable name to a BD_ADDR. The `/etc/bluetooth/hosts` file contains information regarding the known Bluetooth hosts. The following example shows how to obtain human readable name that was assigned to the remote device.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % hccontrol -n ubt0hci remote_name_request 00:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    BD_ADDR: 00:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    Name: Pav's T39\r
-\r
-\r
-If you perform an inquiry on a remote Bluetooth device, it will find your computer as ***your.host.name (ubt0)***. The name assigned to the local device can be changed at any time.\r
-\r
-The Bluetooth system provides a point-to-point connection (only two Bluetooth units involved), or a point-to-multipoint connection. In the point-to-multipoint connection the connection is shared among several Bluetooth devices. The following example shows how to obtain the list of active baseband connections for the local device.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % hccontrol -n ubt0hci read_connection_list\r
-    Remote BD_ADDR    Handle Type Mode Role Encrypt Pending Queue State\r
-    00:80:37:29:19:a4     41  ACL    0 MAST    NONE       0     0 OPEN\r
-\r
-\r
-A ***connection handle*** is useful when termination of the baseband connection is required. Note, that it is normally not required to do it by hand. The stack will automatically terminate inactive baseband connections.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # hccontrol -n ubt0hci disconnect 41\r
-    Connection handle: 41\r
-    Reason: Connection terminated by local host [0x16]\r
-\r
-\r
-Refer to `hccontrol help` for a complete listing of available HCI commands. Most of the HCI commands do not require superuser privileges.\r
-\r
-### 19.4.4 Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol (L2CAP) \r
-\r
-Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol (L2CAP) provides connection-oriented and connectionless data services to upper layer protocols with protocol multiplexing capability and segmentation and reassembly operation. L2CAP permits higher level protocols and applications to transmit and receive L2CAP data packets up to 64 kilobytes in length.\r
-\r
-L2CAP is based around the concept of ***channels***. Channel is a logical connection on top of baseband connection. Each channel is bound to a single protocol in a many-to-one fashion. Multiple channels can be bound to the same protocol, but a channel cannot be bound to multiple protocols. Each L2CAP packet received on a channel is directed to the appropriate higher level protocol. Multiple channels can share the same baseband connection.\r
-\r
-A single Netgraph node of type ***l2cap*** is created for a single Bluetooth device. The L2CAP node is normally connected to the Bluetooth HCI node (downstream) and Bluetooth sockets nodes (upstream). Default name for the L2CAP node is ***devicel2cap***. For more details refer to the [ng_l2cap(4)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#ng_l2cap&section4) man page.\r
-\r
-A useful command is [l2ping(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#l2ping&section8), which can be used to ping other devices. Some Bluetooth implementations might not return all of the data sent to them, so ***0 bytes*** in the following example is normal.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    # l2ping -a 00:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    0 bytes from 0:80:37:29:19:a4 seq_no#0 time48.633 ms result=0\r
-    0 bytes from 0:80:37:29:19:a4 seq_no#1 time37.551 ms result=0\r
-    0 bytes from 0:80:37:29:19:a4 seq_no#2 time28.324 ms result=0\r
-    0 bytes from 0:80:37:29:19:a4 seq_no#3 time46.150 ms result=0\r
-\r
-\r
-The [l2control(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#l2control&section8) utility is used to perform various operations on L2CAP nodes. This example shows how to obtain the list of logical connections (channels) and the list of baseband connections for the local device.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % l2control -a 00:02:72:00:d4:1a read_channel_list\r
-    L2CAP channels:\r
-    Remote BD_ADDR     SCID/ DCID   PSM  IMTU/ OMTU State\r
-    00:07:e0:00:0b:ca    66/   64     3   132/  672 OPEN\r
-    % l2control -a 00:02:72:00:d4:1a read_connection_list\r
-    L2CAP connections:\r
-    Remote BD_ADDR    Handle Flags Pending State\r
-    00:07:e0:00:0b:ca     41 O           0 OPEN\r
-\r
-\r
-Another diagnostic tool is [btsockstat(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#btsockstat&section1). It does a job similar to as [netstat(1)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=netstat&section=1) does, but for Bluetooth network-related data structures. The example below shows the same logical connection as [l2control(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=l2control&section=8) above.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    % btsockstat\r
-    Active L2CAP sockets\r
-    PCB      Recv-Q Send-Q Local address/PSM       Foreign address   CID   State\r
-    c2afe900      0      0 00:02:72:00:d4:1a/3     00:07:e0:00:0b:ca 66    OPEN\r
-    Active RFCOMM sessions\r
-    L2PCB    PCB      Flag MTU   Out-Q DLCs State\r
-    c2afe900 c2b53380 1    127   0     Yes  OPEN\r
-    Active RFCOMM sockets\r
-    PCB      Recv-Q Send-Q Local address     Foreign address   Chan DLCI State\r
-    c2e8bc80      0    250 00:02:72:00:d4:1a 00:07:e0:00:0b:ca 3    6    OPEN\r
-\r
-\r
-### 19.4.5 RFCOMM Protocol \r
-\r
-The RFCOMM protocol provides emulation of serial ports over the L2CAP protocol. The protocol is based on the ETSI standard TS 07.10. RFCOMM is a simple transport protocol, with additional provisions for emulating the 9 circuits of RS-232 (EIATIA-232-E) serial ports. The RFCOMM protocol supports up to 60 simultaneous connections (RFCOMM channels) between two Bluetooth devices.\r
-\r
-For the purposes of RFCOMM, a complete communication path involves two applications running on different devices (the communication endpoints) with a communication segment between them. RFCOMM is intended to cover applications that make use of the serial ports of the devices in which they reside. The communication segment is a Bluetooth link from one device to another (direct connect).\r
-\r
-RFCOMM is only concerned with the connection between the devices in the direct connect case, or between the device and a modem in the network case. RFCOMM can support other configurations, such as modules that communicate via Bluetooth wireless technology on one side and provide a wired interface on the other side.\r
-\r
-In DragonFly the RFCOMM protocol is implemented at the Bluetooth sockets layer.\r
-\r
-### 19.4.6 Pairing of Devices \r
-\r
-By default, Bluetooth communication is not authenticated, and any device can talk to any other device. A Bluetooth device (for example, cellular phone) may choose to require authentication to provide a particular service (for example, Dial-Up service). Bluetooth authentication is normally done with ***PIN codes***. A PIN code is an ASCII string up to 16 characters in length. User is required to enter the same PIN code on both devices. Once user has entered the PIN code, both devices will generate a ***link key***. After that the link key can be stored either in the devices themselves or in a persistent storage. Next time both devices will use previously generated link key. The described above procedure is called ***pairing***. Note that if the link key is lost by any device then pairing must be repeated.\r
-\r
-The [hcsecd(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#hcsecd&section8) daemon is responsible for handling of all Bluetooth authentication requests. The default configuration file is `/etc/bluetooth/hcsecd.conf`. An example section for a cellular phone with the PIN code arbitrarily set to ***1234*** is shown below.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    device {\r
-            bdaddr  00:80:37:29:19:a4;\r
-            name    "Pav's T39";\r
-            key     nokey;\r
-            pin     "1234";\r
-          }\r
-\r
-\r
-There is no limitation on PIN codes (except length). Some devices (for example Bluetooth headsets) may have a fixed PIN code built in. The `-d` switch forces the [hcsecd(8)](http://leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command#hcsecd&section8) daemon to stay in the foreground, so it is easy to see what is happening. Set the remote device to receive pairing and initiate the Bluetooth connection to the remote device. The remote device should say that pairing was accepted, and request the PIN code. Enter the same PIN code as you have in `hcsecd.conf`. Now your PC and the remote device are paired. Alternatively, you can initiate pairing on the remote device. Below in the sample `hcsecd` output.\r
-\r
-    \r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Got Link_Key_Request event from 'ubt0hci', remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Found matching entry, remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4, name 'Pav's T39', link key doesn't exist\r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Sending Link_Key_Negative_Reply to 'ubt0hci' for remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Got PIN_Code_Request event from 'ubt0hci', remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Found matching entry, remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4, name 'Pav's T39', PIN code exists\r
-    hcsecd[16484]: Sending PIN_Code_Reply to 'ubt0hci' for remote bdaddr 0:80:37:29:19:a4\r
-\r
-\r
-### 19.4.7 Service Discovery Protocol (SDP) \r
-\r
-The Service Discovery Protocol (SDP) provides the means for client applications to discover the existence of services provided by server applications as well as the attributes of those services. The attributes of a service include the type or class of service offered and the mechanism or protocol information needed to utilize the service.\r
-\r
-SDP involves communication between a SDP server and a SDP client. The server maintains a list of service records that describe the characteristics of services associated with the server. Each service record contains information about a single service. A client may retrieve information from a service record maintained by the SDP server by issuing a SDP request. If the client, or an application associated with the client, decides to use a service, it must open a separate connection to the service provider in order to utilize the service. SDP provides a mechanism for discovering services and their attributes, but it does not provide a mechanism for utilizing those se