just amended here & there
authorgergoszakal <gergoszakal@web>
Fri, 6 Feb 2009 21:02:49 +0000 (13:02 -0800)
committerCharlie <root@leaf.dragonflybsd.org>
Fri, 6 Feb 2009 21:02:49 +0000 (13:02 -0800)
docs/howtos/HowToFilteringBridge.mdwn

index 85f61ca..e2bee55 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ I have spent many days getting my bridge up & running. Thought I would share the
 I used a dual PII/400 system with 2 Planet-ENW-9607 /sk(4)/ NICs and the machine was running DragonflyBSD 1.6.1.
 
 ## Setting up bridging 
-To enable bridging and PF support on DragonFly you have two options: load the required kernel modules or compile them directly into the kernel. I chose the latter, because ALTQ support ha to be compiled into the kernel anyway in order to use traffic shaping (and I had to recompile for SMP as well :P). Here is my kernel config (only the parts that differ from GENERIC. Note that):
+To enable bridging and PF support on DragonFly you have two options: load the required kernel modules or compile them directly into the kernel. I chose the latter, because ALTQ support ha to be compiled into the kernel anyway in order to use traffic shaping (and I had to recompile for SMP as well :P). Here is my kernel config (only the parts that differ from GENERIC.):
 
     
     machine         i386
@@ -30,31 +30,27 @@ To enable bridging and PF support on DragonFly you have two options: load the re
     device          pflog
     # Symmetric Multiprocessing support
     options        SMP                     # Symmetric MultiProcessor Kernel
-options        APIC_IO                 # Symmetric (APIC) I/O
+    options        APIC_IO                 # Symmetric (APIC) I/O
 After compiling, installing and rebooting I got bridging support. If you don't need/want to compile a kernel you can simply open (or create) ** /boot/loader.conf**  and add these lines:
 
     
     if_bridge_load="YES"
     pf_load="YES"
-pflog_load="YES"
+    pflog_load="YES"
 and if you don't want to reboot, you can load the modules realtime:
-
-    
     # kldload pf.ko
     # kldload pflog.ko
-# kldload if_bridge.ko
+    # kldload if_bridge.ko
 Well, we have bridging support now, we have to create an interface that represents the bridge and tell which NICs belong to it.
 
 Edit /etc/rc.conf and include:
-
-    
     # Replace x.x.x.x with the desired IP.
     ifconfig_sk0="inet x.x.x.x netmask 255.255.255.0"
     ifconfig_sk1="up"
     cloned_interfaces="bridge0"
     ifconfig_bridge0="addm sk0 addm sk1 up"
     pf_enable="YES"
-pflog_enable="YES"
+    pflog_enable="YES"
 There is no need to have IPs in a bridge, but it is generally a good idea to have one interface with an IP address assigned, and if we would like to do filtering, it is necessary (well, for me at least. :P) It is also good because you can SSH into the machine or run it as a DHCP server, caching DNS server etc. as well (I run dhcpd on it, but won't cover that now, there are many great howto's out there). That's it, we have a running bridge with PF. Now let's go and configure filtering!
 
 ## Configuring the firewall