Import binutils-2.20
[dragonfly.git] / contrib / binutils-2.20 / binutils / README
1                 README for BINUTILS
2
3 These are the GNU binutils.  These are utilities of use when dealing
4 with binary files, either object files or executables.  These tools
5 consist of the linker (ld), the assembler (gas), and the profiler
6 (gprof) each of which have their own sub-directory named after them.
7 There is also a collection of other binary tools, including the
8 disassembler (objdump) in this directory.  These tools make use of a
9 pair of libraries (bfd and opcodes) and a common set of header files
10 (include).
11
12 There are README and NEWS files in most of the program sub-directories
13 which give more information about those specific programs.
14
15
16 Unpacking and Installation -- quick overview
17 ============================================
18
19 When you unpack the binutils archive file, you will get a directory
20 called something like `binutils-XXX', where XXX is the number of the
21 release.  (Probably 2.13 or higher).  This directory contains
22 various files and sub-directories.  Most of the files in the top
23 directory are for information and for configuration.  The actual
24 source code is in sub-directories.
25
26 To build binutils, you can just do:
27
28         cd binutils-XXX
29         ./configure [options]
30         make
31         make install # copies the programs files into /usr/local/bin
32                      # by default.
33
34 This will configure and build all the libraries as well as the
35 assembler, the binutils, and the linker.
36
37 If you have GNU make, we recommend building in a different directory:
38
39         mkdir objdir
40         cd objdir
41         ../binutils-XXX/configure [options]
42         make
43         make install
44
45 This relies on the VPATH feature of GNU make.
46
47 By default, the binutils will be configured to support the system on
48 which they are built.  When doing cross development, use the --target
49 configure option to specify a different target, eg:
50
51         ./configure --target=foo-elf        
52
53 The --enable-targets option adds support for more binary file formats
54 besides the default.  List them as the argument to --enable-targets,
55 separated by commas.  For example:
56
57         ./configure --enable-targets=sun3,rs6000-aix,decstation
58
59 The name 'all' compiles in support for all valid BFD targets:
60
61         ./configure --enable-targets=all
62
63 On 32-bit hosts though, this support will be restricted to 32-bit
64 target unless the --enable-64-bit-bfd option is also used:
65
66         ./configure --enable-64-bit-bfd --enable-targets=all
67
68 You can also specify the --enable-shared option when you run
69 configure.  This will build the BFD and opcodes libraries as shared
70 libraries.  You can use arguments with the --enable-shared option to
71 indicate that only certain libraries should be built shared; for
72 example, --enable-shared=bfd.  The only potential shared libraries in
73 a binutils release are bfd and opcodes.
74
75 The binutils will be linked against the shared libraries.  The build
76 step will attempt to place the correct library in the run-time search
77 path for the binaries.  However, in some cases, after you install the
78 binaries, you may have to set an environment variable, normally
79 LD_LIBRARY_PATH, so that the system can find the installed libbfd
80 shared library.
81
82 On hosts that support shared system libraries the binutils will be
83 linked against them.  If you have static versions of the system
84 libraries installed as well and you wish to create static binaries
85 instead then use the LDFLAGS environment variable,  like this:
86
87   ../binutils-XXX/configure LDFLAGS="--static" [more options]
88
89 Note: the two dashes are important.  The binutils make use of the
90 libtool script which has a special interpretation of "-static" when it
91 is in the LDFLAGS environment variable.
92
93 To build under openVMS/AXP, see the file makefile.vms in the top level
94 directory.
95
96
97 Native Language Support
98 =======================
99
100 By default Native Language Support will be enabled for binutils.  On
101 some systems however this support is not present and can lead to error
102 messages such as "undefined reference to `libintl_gettext'" when
103 building there tools.  If that happens the NLS support can be disabled
104 by adding the --disable-nls switch to the configure line like this:
105
106         ../binutils-XXX/configure --disable-nls
107
108
109 If you don't have ar
110 ====================
111
112 If your system does not already have an 'ar' program, the normal
113 binutils build process will not work.  In this case, run configure as
114 usual.  Before running make, run this script:
115
116 #!/bin/sh
117 MAKE_PROG="${MAKE-make}"
118 MAKE="${MAKE_PROG} AR=true LINK=true"
119 export MAKE
120 ${MAKE} $* all-libiberty
121 ${MAKE} $* all-intl
122 ${MAKE} $* all-bfd
123 cd binutils
124 MAKE="${MAKE_PROG}"
125 export MAKE
126 ${MAKE} $* ar_DEPENDENCIES= ar_LDADD='../bfd/*.o ../libiberty/*.o `if test -f ../intl/gettext.o; then echo '../intl/*.o'; fi`' ar
127
128 This script will build an ar program in binutils/ar.  Move binutils/ar
129 into a directory on your PATH.  After doing this, you can run make as
130 usual to build the complete binutils distribution.  You do not need
131 the ranlib program in order to build the distribution.
132
133 Porting
134 =======
135
136 Binutils-2.13 supports many different architectures, but there
137 are many more not supported, including some that were supported
138 by earlier versions.  We are hoping for volunteers to improve this
139 situation.
140
141 The major effort in porting binutils to a new host and/or target
142 architecture involves the BFD library.  There is some documentation
143 in ../bfd/doc.  The file ../gdb/doc/gdbint.texinfo (distributed
144 with gdb-5.x) may also be of help.
145
146 Reporting bugs
147 ==============
148
149 Send bug reports and patches to:
150
151    bug-binutils@gnu.org.
152
153 Please include the following in bug reports:
154
155 - A description of exactly what went wrong, and exactly what should have
156   happened instead.
157
158 - The configuration name(s) given to the "configure" script.  The
159   "config.status" file should have this information.  This is assuming
160   you built binutils yourself.  If you didn't build binutils youself,
161   then we need information regarding your machine and operating system,
162   and it may be more appropriate to report bugs to wherever you obtained
163   binutils.
164
165 - The options given to the tool (gas, objcopy, ld etc.) at run time.
166
167 - The actual input file that caused the problem.
168
169 Always mention the version number you are running; this is printed by
170 running any of the binutils with the --version option.  We appreciate
171 reports about bugs, but we do not promise to fix them, particularly so
172 when the bug report is against an old version.  If you are able, please
173 consider building the latest tools from CVS to check that your bug has
174 not already been fixed.
175
176 When reporting problems about gas and ld, it's useful to provide a
177 testcase that triggers the problem.  In the case of a gas problem, we
178 want input files to gas and command line switches used.  The inputs to
179 gas are _NOT_ .c or .i files, but rather .s files.  If your original
180 source was a C program, you can generate the .s file and see the command
181 line options by passing -v -save-temps to gcc in addition to all the
182 usual options you use.  The reason we don't want C files is that we
183 might not have a C compiler around for the target you use.  While it
184 might be possible to build a compiler, that takes considerable time and
185 disk space, and we might not end up with exactly the same compiler you
186 use.
187
188 In the case of a ld problem, the input files are .o, .a and .so files,
189 and possibly a linker script specified with -T.  Again, when using gcc
190 to link, you can see these files by adding options to the gcc command
191 line.  Use -v -save-temps -Wl,-t, except that on targets that use gcc's
192 collect2, you would add -v -save-temps -Wl,-t,-debug.  The -t option
193 tells ld to print all files and libraries used, so that, for example,
194 you can associate -lc on the ld command line with the actual libc used.
195 Note that your simple two line C program to trigger a problem typically
196 expands into several megabytes of objects by the time you include
197 libraries.
198
199 It is antisocial to post megabyte sized attachments to mailing lists, so
200 please put large testcases somewhere on an ftp or web site so that only
201 interested developers need to download them, or offer to email them on
202 request.  Better still, try to reduce the testcase, for example, try to
203 develop a ld testcase that doesn't use system libraries.  However,
204 please be sure it is a complete testcase and that it really does
205 demonstrate the problem.  Also, don't bother paring it down if that will
206 cause large delays in filing the bug report.
207
208 If you expect to be contributing a large number of test cases, it would
209 be helpful if you would look at the test suite included in the release
210 (based on the Deja Gnu testing framework, available from the usual ftp
211 sites) and write test cases to fit into that framework.  This is
212 certainly not required.
213
214 VMS
215 ===
216
217 This section was written by Klaus K"ampf <kkaempf@rmi.de>.  It
218 describes how to build and install the binutils on openVMS (Alpha and
219 Vax).  (The BFD library only supports reading Vax object files.)
220
221 Compiling the release:
222
223 To compile the gnu binary utilities and the gnu assembler, you'll
224 need DEC C or GNU C for openVMS/Alpha. You'll need *both* compilers
225 on openVMS/Vax.
226
227 Compiling with either DEC C or GNU C works on openVMS/Alpha only. Some
228 of the opcodes and binutils files trap a bug in the DEC C optimizer,
229 so these files must be compiled with /noopt.
230
231 Compiling on openVMS/Vax is a bit complicated, as the bfd library traps
232 a bug in GNU C and the gnu assembler a bug in (my version of) DEC C.
233
234 I never tried compiling with VAX C.
235
236
237 You further need GNU Make Version 3.76 or later. This is available
238 at ftp.progis.de or any GNU archive site. The makefiles assume that
239 gmake starts gnu make as a foreign command.
240
241 If you're compiling with DEC C or VAX C, you must run
242
243   $ @setup
244
245 before starting gnu-make. This isn't needed with GNU C.
246
247 On the Alpha you can choose the compiler by editing the toplevel
248 makefile.vms. Either select CC=cc (for DEC C) or CC=gcc (for GNU C)
249
250
251 Installing the release
252
253 Provided that your directory setup conforms to the GNU on openVMS
254 standard, you already have a concealed device named 'GNU_ROOT'.
255 In this case, a simple
256
257  $ gmake install
258
259 suffices to copy all programs and libraries to the proper directories.
260
261 Define the programs as foreign commands by adding these lines to your
262 login.com:
263
264   $ gas :== $GNU_ROOT:[bin]as.exe
265   $ size :== $GNU_ROOT:[bin]size.exe
266   $ nm :== $GNU_ROOT:[bin]nm.exe
267   $ objdump :== $GNU_ROOT:[bin]objdump.exe
268   $ strings :== $GNU_ROOT:[bin]strings.exe
269
270 If you have a different directory setup, copy the binary utilities
271 ([.binutils]size.exe, [.binutils]nm.exe, [.binutils]objdump.exe,
272 and [.binutils]strings.exe) and the gnu assembler and preprocessor
273 ([.gas]as.exe and [.gas]gasp.exe]) to a directory of your choice
274 and define all programs as foreign commands.
275
276
277 If you're satisfied with the compilation, you may want to remove
278 unneeded objects and libraries:
279
280   $ gmake clean
281
282
283 If you have any problems or questions about the binutils on VMS, feel
284 free to mail me at kkaempf@rmi.de.