gdb vendor branch: Bring in additional source files
[dragonfly.git] / contrib / gdb-7 / gdb / progspace.h
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1/* Program and address space management, for GDB, the GNU debugger.
2
a45ae5f8 3 Copyright (C) 2009-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
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4
5 This file is part of GDB.
6
7 This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
8 it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
9 the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or
10 (at your option) any later version.
11
12 This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
13 but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
14 MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
15 GNU General Public License for more details.
16
17 You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
18 along with this program. If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. */
19
20
21#ifndef PROGSPACE_H
22#define PROGSPACE_H
23
24#include "target.h"
25#include "vec.h"
26
27struct target_ops;
28struct bfd;
29struct objfile;
30struct inferior;
31struct exec;
32struct address_space;
33struct program_space_data;
34
35/* A program space represents a symbolic view of an address space.
36 Roughly speaking, it holds all the data associated with a
37 non-running-yet program (main executable, main symbols), and when
38 an inferior is running and is bound to it, includes the list of its
39 mapped in shared libraries.
40
41 In the traditional debugging scenario, there's a 1-1 correspondence
42 among program spaces, inferiors and address spaces, like so:
43
44 pspace1 (prog1) <--> inf1(pid1) <--> aspace1
45
46 In the case of debugging more than one traditional unix process or
47 program, we still have:
48
49 |-----------------+------------+---------|
50 | pspace1 (prog1) | inf1(pid1) | aspace1 |
51 |----------------------------------------|
52 | pspace2 (prog1) | no inf yet | aspace2 |
53 |-----------------+------------+---------|
54 | pspace3 (prog2) | inf2(pid2) | aspace3 |
55 |-----------------+------------+---------|
56
57 In the former example, if inf1 forks (and GDB stays attached to
58 both processes), the new child will have its own program and
59 address spaces. Like so:
60
61 |-----------------+------------+---------|
62 | pspace1 (prog1) | inf1(pid1) | aspace1 |
63 |-----------------+------------+---------|
64 | pspace2 (prog1) | inf2(pid2) | aspace2 |
65 |-----------------+------------+---------|
66
67 However, had inf1 from the latter case vforked instead, it would
68 share the program and address spaces with its parent, until it
69 execs or exits, like so:
70
71 |-----------------+------------+---------|
72 | pspace1 (prog1) | inf1(pid1) | aspace1 |
73 | | inf2(pid2) | |
74 |-----------------+------------+---------|
75
76 When the vfork child execs, it is finally given new program and
77 address spaces.
78
79 |-----------------+------------+---------|
80 | pspace1 (prog1) | inf1(pid1) | aspace1 |
81 |-----------------+------------+---------|
82 | pspace2 (prog1) | inf2(pid2) | aspace2 |
83 |-----------------+------------+---------|
84
85 There are targets where the OS (if any) doesn't provide memory
86 management or VM protection, where all inferiors share the same
87 address space --- e.g. uClinux. GDB models this by having all
88 inferiors share the same address space, but, giving each its own
89 program space, like so:
90
91 |-----------------+------------+---------|
92 | pspace1 (prog1) | inf1(pid1) | |
93 |-----------------+------------+ |
94 | pspace2 (prog1) | inf2(pid2) | aspace1 |
95 |-----------------+------------+ |
96 | pspace3 (prog2) | inf3(pid3) | |
97 |-----------------+------------+---------|
98
99 The address space sharing matters for run control and breakpoints
100 management. E.g., did we just hit a known breakpoint that we need
101 to step over? Is this breakpoint a duplicate of this other one, or
102 do I need to insert a trap?
103
104 Then, there are targets where all symbols look the same for all
105 inferiors, although each has its own address space, as e.g.,
106 Ericsson DICOS. In such case, the model is:
107
108 |---------+------------+---------|
109 | | inf1(pid1) | aspace1 |
110 | +------------+---------|
111 | pspace | inf2(pid2) | aspace2 |
112 | +------------+---------|
113 | | inf3(pid3) | aspace3 |
114 |---------+------------+---------|
115
116 Note however, that the DICOS debug API takes care of making GDB
117 believe that breakpoints are "global". That is, although each
118 process does have its own private copy of data symbols (just like a
119 bunch of forks), to the breakpoints module, all processes share a
120 single address space, so all breakpoints set at the same address
121 are duplicates of each other, even breakpoints set in the data
122 space (e.g., call dummy breakpoints placed on stack). This allows
123 a simplification in the spaces implementation: we avoid caring for
124 a many-many links between address and program spaces. Either
125 there's a single address space bound to the program space
126 (traditional unix/uClinux), or, in the DICOS case, the address
127 space bound to the program space is mostly ignored. */
128
129/* The program space structure. */
130
131struct program_space
132 {
133 /* Pointer to next in linked list. */
134 struct program_space *next;
135
136 /* Unique ID number. */
137 int num;
138
139 /* The main executable loaded into this program space. This is
140 managed by the exec target. */
141
142 /* The BFD handle for the main executable. */
143 bfd *ebfd;
144 /* The last-modified time, from when the exec was brought in. */
145 long ebfd_mtime;
146
147 /* The address space attached to this program space. More than one
148 program space may be bound to the same address space. In the
149 traditional unix-like debugging scenario, this will usually
150 match the address space bound to the inferior, and is mostly
151 used by the breakpoints module for address matches. If the
152 target shares a program space for all inferiors and breakpoints
153 are global, then this field is ignored (we don't currently
154 support inferiors sharing a program space if the target doesn't
155 make breakpoints global). */
156 struct address_space *aspace;
157
158 /* True if this program space's section offsets don't yet represent
159 the final offsets of the "live" address space (that is, the
160 section addresses still require the relocation offsets to be
161 applied, and hence we can't trust the section addresses for
162 anything that pokes at live memory). E.g., for qOffsets
163 targets, or for PIE executables, until we connect and ask the
164 target for the final relocation offsets, the symbols we've used
165 to set breakpoints point at the wrong addresses. */
166 int executing_startup;
167
168 /* True if no breakpoints should be inserted in this program
169 space. */
170 int breakpoints_not_allowed;
171
172 /* The object file that the main symbol table was loaded from
173 (e.g. the argument to the "symbol-file" or "file" command). */
174 struct objfile *symfile_object_file;
175
176 /* All known objfiles are kept in a linked list. This points to
c50c785c 177 the head of this list. */
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178 struct objfile *objfiles;
179
180 /* The set of target sections matching the sections mapped into
181 this program space. Managed by both exec_ops and solib.c. */
182 struct target_section_table target_sections;
183
184 /* List of shared objects mapped into this space. Managed by
185 solib.c. */
186 struct so_list *so_list;
187
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188 /* Number of calls to solib_add. */
189 unsigned solib_add_generation;
190
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191 /* Per pspace data-pointers required by other GDB modules. */
192 void **data;
193 unsigned num_data;
194 };
195
196/* The object file that the main symbol table was loaded from (e.g. the
197 argument to the "symbol-file" or "file" command). */
198
199#define symfile_objfile current_program_space->symfile_object_file
200
201/* All known objfiles are kept in a linked list. This points to the
c50c785c 202 root of this list. */
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203#define object_files current_program_space->objfiles
204
205/* The set of target sections matching the sections mapped into the
206 current program space. */
207#define current_target_sections (&current_program_space->target_sections)
208
209/* The list of all program spaces. There's always at least one. */
210extern struct program_space *program_spaces;
211
212/* The current program space. This is always non-null. */
213extern struct program_space *current_program_space;
214
215#define ALL_PSPACES(pspace) \
216 for ((pspace) = program_spaces; (pspace) != NULL; (pspace) = (pspace)->next)
217
218/* Add a new empty program space, and assign ASPACE to it. Returns the
219 pointer to the new object. */
220extern struct program_space *add_program_space (struct address_space *aspace);
221
222/* Release PSPACE and removes it from the pspace list. */
223extern void remove_program_space (struct program_space *pspace);
224
225/* Returns the number of program spaces listed. */
226extern int number_of_program_spaces (void);
227
228/* Copies program space SRC to DEST. Copies the main executable file,
229 and the main symbol file. Returns DEST. */
230extern struct program_space *clone_program_space (struct program_space *dest,
231 struct program_space *src);
232
233/* Save the current program space so that it may be restored by a later
234 call to do_cleanups. Returns the struct cleanup pointer needed for
235 later doing the cleanup. */
236extern struct cleanup *save_current_program_space (void);
237
238/* Sets PSPACE as the current program space. This is usually used
239 instead of set_current_space_and_thread when the current
240 thread/inferior is not important for the operations that follow.
241 E.g., when accessing the raw symbol tables. If memory access is
242 required, then you should use switch_to_program_space_and_thread.
243 Otherwise, it is the caller's responsibility to make sure that the
244 currently selected inferior/thread matches the selected program
245 space. */
246extern void set_current_program_space (struct program_space *pspace);
247
248/* Saves the current thread (may be null), frame and program space in
249 the current cleanup chain. */
250extern struct cleanup *save_current_space_and_thread (void);
251
252/* Switches full context to program space PSPACE. Switches to the
253 first thread found bound to PSPACE. */
254extern void switch_to_program_space_and_thread (struct program_space *pspace);
255
256/* Create a new address space object, and add it to the list. */
257extern struct address_space *new_address_space (void);
258
259/* Maybe create a new address space object, and add it to the list, or
260 return a pointer to an existing address space, in case inferiors
261 share an address space. */
262extern struct address_space *maybe_new_address_space (void);
263
264/* Returns the integer address space id of ASPACE. */
265extern int address_space_num (struct address_space *aspace);
266
267/* Update all program spaces matching to address spaces. The user may
268 have created several program spaces, and loaded executables into
269 them before connecting to the target interface that will create the
270 inferiors. All that happens before GDB has a chance to know if the
271 inferiors will share an address space or not. Call this after
272 having connected to the target interface and having fetched the
273 target description, to fixup the program/address spaces
274 mappings. */
275extern void update_address_spaces (void);
276
277/* Prune away automatically added program spaces that aren't required
278 anymore. */
279extern void prune_program_spaces (void);
280
281/* Keep a registry of per-pspace data-pointers required by other GDB
282 modules. */
283
284extern const struct program_space_data *register_program_space_data (void);
285extern const struct program_space_data *register_program_space_data_with_cleanup
286 (void (*cleanup) (struct program_space *, void *));
287extern void clear_program_space_data (struct program_space *pspace);
288extern void set_program_space_data (struct program_space *pspace,
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289 const struct program_space_data *data,
290 void *value);
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291extern void *program_space_data (struct program_space *pspace,
292 const struct program_space_data *data);
293
294#endif