Convert to mdoc.
authorSascha Wildner <swildner@dragonflybsd.org>
Sun, 11 Mar 2007 19:05:31 +0000 (19:05 +0000)
committerSascha Wildner <swildner@dragonflybsd.org>
Sun, 11 Mar 2007 19:05:31 +0000 (19:05 +0000)
Obtained from (except for bs(6)): NetBSD

games/atc/atc.6
games/backgammon/backgammon/backgammon.6
games/battlestar/battlestar.6
games/bs/bs.6
games/canfield/canfield/canfield.6
games/cribbage/cribbage.6
games/fish/fish.6
games/hack/hack.6

index 88a096d..6dbb5d5 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)atc.6       8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/atc/atc.6,v 1.6.2.1 2001/07/22 11:32:34 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/atc/atc.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:22 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/atc/atc.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:30 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.       \" XP - exdented paragraph
-.de XP
-.RT
-.if \\n(1T .sp \\n(PDu
-.ne 1.1
-.if !\\n(IP .nr IP +1
-.in +\\n(I\\n(IRu
-.ti -\\n(I\\n(IRu
-..
 .\" Copyright (c) 1986 Ed James. All rights reserved.
 .\"
-.TH ATC 6 "May 31, 1993"
-.UC
-.SH NAME
-atc \- air traffic controller game
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B atc
--[u?lstp] [-[gf] game_name] [-r random seed]
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-.LP
-.I Atc
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt ATC 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm atc
+.Nd air traffic controller game
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl u?lstp
+.Op Fl gf Ar game
+.Op Fl r Ar seed
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+.Nm
 lets you try your hand at the nerve wracking duties of the air traffic
-controller without endangering the lives of millions of
-travelers each year.
+controller without endangering the lives of millions of travelers each year.
 Your responsibilities require you to direct the flight of jets
 and prop planes into and out of the flight arena and airports.
 The speed (update time) and frequency of the planes depend on the
 difficulty of the chosen arena.
-.SH OPTIONS
-.LP
-.TP 8
-.B \-u
+.Sh OPTIONS
+.Bl -tag -width ".Fl u"
+.It Fl u
 Print the usage line and exit.
-.TP
-.B \-?
+.It Fl \&?
 Same as
-.B \-u.
-.TP
-.B \-l
+.Fl u .
+.It Fl l
 Print a list of available games and exit.
 The first game name printed is the default game.
-.TP
-.B \-s
+.It Fl s
 Print the score list (formerly the Top Ten list).
-.TP
-.B \-t
+.It Fl t
 Same as
-.B \-s.
-.TP
-.B \-p
+.Fl s .
+.It Fl p
 Print the path to the special directory where
-.I atc
-expects to find its private files.  This is used during the
-installation of the program.
-.TP
-.B "\-g game"
-Play the named game.  If the game listed is not one of the
-ones printed from the
-.B \-l
+.Nm
+expects to find its private files.
+This is used during the installation of the program.
+.It Fl g Ar game
+Play the named game.
+If the game listed is not one of the ones printed from the
+.Fl l
 option, the default game is played.
-.TP
-.B "\-f game"
+.It Fl f Ar game
 Same as
-.B \-g.
-.TP
-.B "\-r seed"
-Set the random seed.  The purpose of this flag is questionable.
-.SH GOALS
-.LP
+.Fl g .
+.It Fl r Ar seed
+Set the random seed.
+The purpose of this flag is questionable.
+.El
+.Sh GOALS
 Your goal in
-.I atc
+.Nm
 is to keep the game going as long as possible.
 There is no winning state, except to beat the times of other players.
 You will need to: launch planes at airports (by instructing them to
 increase their altitude); land planes at airports (by instructing them to
 go to altitude zero when exactly over the airport); and maneuver planes
 out of exit points.
-.LP
+.Pp
 Several things will cause the end of the game.
 Each plane has a destination (see information area), and
 sending a plane to the wrong destination is an error.
-Planes can run out of fuel, or can collide.  Collision is defined as
-adjacency in any of the three dimensions.  A plane leaving the arena
+Planes can run out of fuel, or can collide.
+Collision is defined as adjacency in all three dimensions.
+A plane leaving the arena
 in any other way than through its destination exit is an error as well.
-.LP
-Scores are sorted in order of the number of planes safe.  The other
-statistics are provided merely for fun.  There is no penalty for
+.Pp
+Scores are sorted in order of the number of planes safe.
+The other statistics are provided merely for fun.
+There is no penalty for
 taking longer than another player (except in the case of ties).
-.LP
-Suspending a game is not permitted.  If you get a talk message, tough.
-When was the last time an Air Traffic Controller got called away to
-the phone?
-.SH "THE DISPLAY"
-.LP
+.Pp
+Suspending a game is not permitted.
+If you get a talk message, tough.
+When was the last time an Air Traffic Controller got called away to the phone?
+.Sh THE DISPLAY
 Depending on the terminal you run
-.I atc
+.Nm
 on, the screen will be divided into 4 areas.
 It should be stressed that the terminal driver portion of the
 game was designed to be reconfigurable, so the display format can vary
-depending the version you are playing.  The descriptions here are based
-on the ASCII version
-of the game.  The game rules and input format, however,
-should remain consistent.
+depending on the version you are playing.
+The descriptions here are based on the ASCII version of the game.
+The game rules and input format, however, should remain consistent.
 Control-L redraws the screen, should it become muddled.
-.SS RADAR
-.IP
+.Ss RADAR
 The first screen area is the radar display, showing the relative locations
 of the planes, airports, standard entry/exit points, radar
-beacons, and "lines" which simply serve to aid you in guiding
+beacons, and ``lines'' which simply serve to aid you in guiding
 the planes.
-.IP
-Planes are shown as a single letter with an altitude.  If
-the numerical altitude is a single digit, then it represents
+.Pp
+Planes are shown as a single letter with an altitude.
+If the numerical altitude is a single digit, then it represents
 thousands of feet.
-Some distinction is made between the prop
-planes and the jets.  On ASCII terminals, prop planes are
+Some distinction is made between the prop planes and the jets.
+On ASCII terminals, prop planes are
 represented by a upper case letter, jets by a lower case letter.
-.IP
+.Pp
 Airports are shown as a number and some indication of the direction
 planes must be going to land at the airport.
-On ASCII terminals, this is one of '^', '>', '<', and 'v', to indicate
+On ASCII terminals, this is one of '^', '\*[Gt]', '\*[Lt]', and 'v', to indicate
 north (0 degrees), east (90), west (270) and south (180), respectively.
-The planes will also
-take off in this direction.
-.IP
+The planes will also take off in this direction.
+.Pp
 Beacons are represented as circles or asterisks and a number.
 Their purpose is to offer a place of easy reference to the plane pilots.
-See 'the delay command' under the input section of this manual.
-.IP
+See
+.Sx THE DELAY COMMAND
+section below.
+.Pp
 Entry/exit points are displayed as numbers along the border of the
-radar screen.  Planes will enter the arena from these points without
-warning.  These points have a direction associated with them, and
-planes will always enter the arena from this direction.  On the
-ASCII version of
-.I atc,
-this direction is not displayed.  It will become apparent
-what this direction is as the game progresses.
-.IP
+radar screen.
+Planes will enter the arena from these points without warning.
+These points have a direction associated with them, and
+planes will always enter the arena from this direction.
+On the ASCII version of
+.Nm ,
+this direction is not displayed.
+It will become apparent what this direction is as the game progresses.
+.Pp
 Incoming planes will always enter at the same altitude: 7000 feet.
 For a plane to successfully depart through an entry/exit point,
 it must be flying at 9000 feet.
 It is not necessary for the planes to be flying in any particular
 direction when they leave the arena (yet).
-.SS "INFORMATION AREA"
-.IP
+.Ss INFORMATION AREA
 The second area of the display is the information area, which lists
 the time (number of updates since start), and the number of planes you
 have directed safely out of the arena.
@@ -188,356 +173,290 @@ Below this is a list of planes currently in the air, followed by a
 blank line, and then a list of planes on the ground (at airports).
 Each line lists the plane name and its current altitude,
 an optional asterisk indicating low fuel, the plane's destination,
-and the plane's current command.  Changing altitude is not considered
-to be a command and is therefore not displayed.  The following are
-some possible information lines:
-.IP
-       B4*A0: Circle @ b1
-.br
-       g7 E4: 225
-.IP
-The first example shows a prop plane named 'B' that is flying at 4000
-feet.  It is low on fuel (note the '*').  It's destination is
-Airport #0.
-The next command it expects
-to do is circle when it reaches Beacon #1.
-The second example shows a jet named 'g' at 7000 feet, destined for
-Exit #4.  It is just now executing a turn to 225 degrees (South-West).
-.SS "INPUT AREA"
-.IP
-The third area of the display is the input area.  It is here that
-your input is reflected.  See the INPUT heading of this manual
-for more details.
-.SS "AUTHOR AREA"
-.IP
+and the plane's current command.
+Changing altitude is not considered
+to be a command and is therefore not displayed.
+The following are some possible information lines:
+.Pp
+.Bd -literal -offset indent
+B4*A0: Circle @ b1
+g7 E4: 225
+.Ed
+.Pp
+The first example shows a prop plane named `B' that is flying at 4000 feet.
+It is low on fuel (note the `*').
+Its destination is Airport #0.
+The next command it expects to do is circle when it reaches Beacon #1.
+The second example shows a jet named `g' at 7000 feet, destined for
+Exit #4.
+It is just now executing a turn to 225 degrees (South-West).
+.Ss INPUT AREA
+The third area of the display is the input area.
+It is here that your input is reflected.
+See the
+.Sx INPUT
+heading of this manual for more details.
+.Ss AUTHOR AREA
 This area is used simply to give credit where credit is due. :-)
-.SH INPUT
-.LP
-A command completion interface is built into
-the game.  At any time, typing '?' will list possible input characters.
+.Sh INPUT
+A command completion interface is built into the game.
+At any time, typing `?' will list possible input characters.
 Typing a backspace (your erase character) backs up, erasing the last part
-of the command.  When a command is complete, a return enters it, and
-any semantic checking is done at that time.  If no errors are detected,
-the command is sent to the appropriate plane.  If an error is discovered
+of the command.
+When a command is complete, a return enters it, and
+any semantic checking is done at that time.
+If no errors are detected, the command is sent to the appropriate plane.
+If an error is discovered
 during the check, the offending statement will be underscored and a
 (hopefully) descriptive message will be printed under it.
-.LP
+.Pp
 The command syntax is broken into two parts:
-.I "Immediate Only"
+.Em Immediate Only
 and
-.I Delayable
+.Em Delayable
 commands.
-.I "Immediate Only"
-commands happen on the next
-update.
-.I Delayable
+.Em Immediate Only
+commands happen on the next update.
+.Em Delayable
 commands also happen on the next update unless they
 are followed by an optional predicate called the
-.I Delay
+.Em Delay
 command.
-.LP
+.Pp
 In the following tables, the syntax
-.B [0\-9]
+.Em [0\-9]
 means any single digit, and
-.B <dir>
-refers to the keys around the 's' key, namely ``wedcxzaq''.
-In absolute references, 'q' refers to North-West or 315 degrees, and 'w'
+.Aq Em dir
+refers to a direction, given by the keys around the `s' key: ``wedcxzaq''.
+In absolute references, `q' refers to North-West or 315 degrees, and `w'
 refers to North, or 0 degrees.
-In relative references, 'q' refers to -45 degrees or 45 degrees left, and 'w'
+In relative references, `q' refers to \-45 degrees or 45 degrees left, and `w'
 refers to 0 degrees, or no change in direction.
-.LP
-All commands start with a plane letter.  This indicates the recipient
-of the command.  Case is ignored.
-.SS "IMMEDIATE ONLY COMMANDS"
-.RS
-.B "\- a Altitude:"
-.RS
-Affect a plane's altitude (and take off).
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0\-9] Number:"
-.RS
-Go to the given altitude (thousands of feet).
-.RE
-.B "\- c/+ Climb:"
-.RS
-Relative altitude change.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0\-9] Number:"
-.RS
-Difference in thousands of feet.
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- d/\- Descend:"
-.RS
-Relative altitude change.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0\-9] Number:"
-.RS
-Difference in thousands of feet.
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- m Mark:"
-.RS
-Display in highlighted mode.  Command is displayed normally.
-.RE
-.B "\- i Ignore:"
-.RS
-Do not display highlighted.  Command is displayed as a
-line of dashes if there is no command.
-.RE
-.B "\- u Unmark:"
-.RS
-Same as ignore, but if a delayed command is processed,
-the plane will become marked.  This is useful if you want
-to forget about a plane during part, but not all, of its
-journey.
-.RE
-.RE
-.SS "DELAYABLE COMMANDS"
-.RS
-.B "\- c Circle:"
-.RS
-Have the plane circle.
-.RE
-.B "\- t Turn:"
-.RS
-Change direction.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- l Left:"
-.RS
-Turn counterclockwise (45 degrees by default).
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- <dir> Direction:"
-.RS
-Turn ccw the given number of degrees.
-Zero degrees is no turn.  A ccw turn
-of -45 degrees is 45 cw.
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- r Right:"
-.RS
-Turn clockwise (45 degrees by default).
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- <dir> Direction:"
-.RS
-Same as turn left <dir>.
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- L Left 90:"
-.RS
-Turn counterclockwise 90 degrees.
-.RE
-.B "\- R Right 90:"
-.RS
-Turn clockwise 90 degrees.
-.RE
-.B "\- <dir> Direction:"
-.RS
-Turn to the absolute compass heading given.
+.Pp
+All commands start with a plane letter.
+This indicates the recipient of the command.
+Case is ignored.
+.Ss IMMEDIATE ONLY COMMANDS
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaa"
+.It "a [ cd+- ]" Em number
+Altitude: Change a plane's altitude, possibly requesting takeoff.
+`+' and `-' are the same as `c' and `d'.
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaaaaaaaa" -compact
+.It a Em number
+Climb or descend to the given altitude (in thousands of feet).
+.It ac Em number
+Climb: relative altitude change.
+.It ad Em number
+Descend: relative altitude change.
+.El
+.It m
+Mark: Display in highlighted mode.
+Plane and command information is displayed normally.
+.It i
+Ignore: Do not display highlighted.
+Command is displayed as a line of dashes if there is no command.
+.It u
+Unmark: Same as ignore, but if a delayed command is processed,
+the plane will become marked.
+This is useful if you want to forget about a plane during part,
+but not all, of its journey.
+.El
+.Ss DELAYABLE COMMANDS
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaa"
+.It "c [ lr ]"
+Circle: Have the plane circle.
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaaaaaaaa" -compact
+.It cl
+Left: Circle counterclockwise.
+.It cr
+Right: Circle clockwise (default).
+.El
+.It "t [ l-r+LR ] [ dir ] or tt [ abe* ]" Em number
+Turn: Change direction.
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaaaaaaaa" -compact
+.It "t\*[Lt]dir\*[Gt]"
+Turn to direction: Turn to the absolute compass heading given.
 The shortest turn will be taken.
-.RE
-.B "\- t Towards:"
-.RS
-Turn towards a beacon, airport or exit.  The turn is
-just an estimate.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- b/* Beacon:"
-.RS
-Turn towards the beacon.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0-9] Number:"
-.RS
-The beacon number.
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- e Exit:"
-.RS
-Turn towards the exit.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0-9] Number:"
-.RS
-The exit number.
-.RE
-.RE
-.B "\- a Airport:"
-.RS
-Turn towards the airport.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0-9] Number:"
-.RS
-The airport number.
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.SS THE DELAY COMMAND
-.LP
+.It "tl [ dir ]"
+Left: Turn counterclockwise: 45 degrees by default, or the amount
+specified in
+.Aq dir
+(not
+.Em to
+.Aq dir . )
+`w' (0 degrees) is no turn.
+`e' is 45 degrees; `q' gives \-45 degrees counterclockwise, that is,
+45 degrees clockwise.
+.It "t- [ dir ]"
+Same as left.
+.It "tr [ dir ]"
+Right: Turn clockwise, 45 degrees by default, or the amount specified in
+.Aq dir .
+.It "t+ [ dir ]"
+Same as right.
+.It tL
+Hard left: Turn counterclockwise 90 degrees.
+.It tR
+Hard right: Turn clockwise 90 degrees.
+.It "tt [abe*]"
+Towards: Turn towards a beacon, airport or exit.
+The turn is just an estimate.
+.It "tta" Em number
+Turn towards the given airport.
+.It "ttb" Em number
+Turn towards the specified beacon.
+.It "tte" Em number
+Turn towards an exit.
+.It "tt*" Em number
+Same as ttb.
+.El
+.El
+.Ss THE DELAY COMMAND
 The
-.B Delay
-(a/@)
-command may be appended to any
-.B Delayable
-command.  It allows the controller to instruct a plane to do an action
-when the plane reaches a particular beacon (or other objects in future
-versions).
-.sp
-.RS
-.B "\- a/@ At:"
-.RS
-Do the given delayable command when the plane reaches the given beacon.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- b/* Beacon:"
-.RS
-This is redundant to allow for expansion.
-.RE
-.RS
-.B "\- [0-9] Number:"
-.RS
-The beacon number.
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.RE
-.SS "MARKING, UNMARKING AND IGNORING"
-.LP
+.Em Delay
+(a/@) command may be appended to any
+.Em Delayable
+command.
+It allows the controller to instruct a plane to do an action when the
+plane reaches a particular beacon (or other objects in future versions).
+.Bl -tag -width "aaaa"
+.It ab Em number
+Do the delayable command when the plane reaches the specified beacon.
+The `b' for ``beacon'' is redundant to allow for expansion.
+`@' can be used instead of `a'.
+.El
+.Ss MARKING, UNMARKING AND IGNORING
 Planes are
-.B marked
-when they enter the arena.  This means they are displayed in highlighted
-mode on the radar display.  A plane may also be either
-.B unmarked
+.Em marked
+by default when they enter the arena.
+This means they are displayed in highlighted mode on the radar display.
+A plane may also be either
+.Em unmarked
 or
-.B ignored.
+.Em ignored .
 An
-.B unmarked
+.Em ignored
 plane is drawn in unhighlighted mode, and a line of dashes is displayed in
-the command field of the information area.  The plane will remain this
-way until a mark command has been issued.  Any other command will be issued,
-but the command line will return to a line of dashes when the command
-is completed.
-.LP
+the command field of the information area.
+The plane will remain this way until a mark command has been issued.
+Any other command will be issued, but the command line will return to a
+line of dashes when the command is completed.
+.Pp
 An
-.B ignored
-plane is treated the same as an unmarked plane, except that it will
-automatically switch to
-.B marked
-status when a delayed command has been processed.  This is useful if
-you want to forget about a plane for a while, but its flight path has
-not yet been completely set.
-.LP
+.Em unmarked
+plane is treated the same as an
+.Em ignored
+plane, except that it will automatically switch to
+.Em marked
+status when a delayed command has been processed.
+This is useful if you want to forget about a plane for a while, but its
+flight path has not yet been completely set.
+.Pp
 As with all of the commands, marking, unmarking and ignoring will take effect
-at the beginning of the next update.  Do not be surprised if the plane does
+at the beginning of the next update.
+Do not be surprised if the plane does
 not immediately switch to unhighlighted mode.
-.SS EXAMPLES
-.RS
-.TP 16
-atlab1
-a: turn left at beacon #1
-.TP 16
-cc
-C: circle
-.TP 16
-gtte4ab2
-g: turn towards exit #4 at beacon #2
-.TP 16
-ma+2
-m: altitude: climb 2000 feet
-.TP 16
-stq
-S: turn to 315
-.TP 16
-xi
-x: ignore
-.RE
-.SH "OTHER INFORMATION"
-.LP
+.Ss EXAMPLES
+.Bl -tag -width gtte4ab2 -offset indent
+.It atlab1
+Plane A: turn left at beacon #1
+.It cc
+Plane C: circle
+.It gtte4ab2
+Plane G: turn towards exit #4 at beacon #2
+.It ma+2
+Plane M: altitude: climb 2000 feet
+.It stq
+Plane S: turn to 315
+.It xi
+Plane X: ignore
+.El
+.Sh OTHER INFORMATION
+.Bl -bullet
+.It
 Jets move every update; prop planes move every other update.
-.LP
-All planes turn a most 90 degrees per movement.
-.LP
+.It
+All planes turn at most 90 degrees per movement.
+.It
 Planes enter at 7000 feet and leave at 9000 feet.
-.LP
+.It
 Planes flying at an altitude of 0 crash if they are not over an airport.
-.LP
+.It
 Planes waiting at airports can only be told to take off (climb in altitude).
-.SH "NEW GAMES"
-.LP
+.It
+Pressing return (that is, entering an empty command) will perform the
+next update immediately.
+This allows you to ``fast forward''
+the game clock if nothing interesting is happening.
+.El
+.Sh NEW GAMES
 The
-.B Game_List
-file lists the currently available play fields.  New field description
-file names must be placed in this file to be 'playable'.  If a player
-specifies a game not in this file, his score will not be logged.
-.LP
-The game field description files are broken into two parts.  The first
-part is the definition section.  Here, the four tunable game parameters
-must be set.  These variables are set with the syntax:
-.IP
-variable = number;
-.LP
+.Pa Game_List
+file lists the currently available play fields.
+New field description file names must be placed in this file to be playable.
+If a player specifies a game not in this file, his score will not be logged.
+.Pp
+The game field description files are broken into two parts.
+The first part is the definition section.
+Here, the four tunable game parameters must be set.
+These variables are set with the syntax:
+.Pp
+.Dl "variable = number;"
+.Pp
 Variable may be one of:
-.B update,
+.Li update ,
 indicating the number of seconds between forced updates;
-.B newplane,
+.Li newplane ,
 indicating (about) the number of updates between new plane entries;
-.B width,
-indicating the width of the play field; and
-.B height,
+.Li width ,
+indicating the width of the play field; or
+.Li height ,
 indicating the height of the play field.
-.LP
+.Pp
 The second part of the field description files describes the locations
 of the exits, the beacons, the airports and the lines.
 The syntax is as follows:
-.IP
-beacon:        (x y) ... ;
-.br
-airport:       (x y direction) ... ;
-.br
-exit:  (x y direction) ... ;
-.br
-line:  [ (x1 y1) (x2 y2) ] ... ;
-.LP
+.Pp
+.Bd -literal -offset indent
+.Bl -tag -width airport: -compact
+.It beacon :
+(x y) ... ;
+.It airport :
+(x y direction) ... ;
+.It exit :
+(x y direction) ... ;
+.It line :
+[ (x1 y1) (x2 y2) ] ... ;
+.El
+.Ed
+.Pp
 For beacons, a simple x, y coordinate pair is used (enclosed in parenthesis).
-Airports and exits require a third value, a direction, which is one
-of
-.B wedcxzaq.
+Airports and exits require a third value, which is one of the directions
+.Em wedcxzaq .
 For airports, this is the direction that planes must be going to take
-off and land, and for exits, this is the direction that planes will going
-when they
-.B enter
-the arena.  This may not seem intuitive, but as there is no restriction on
+off and land, and for exits, this is the direction that planes will be
+going when they
+.Em enter
+the arena.
+This may not seem intuitive, but as there is no restriction on
 direction of exit, this is appropriate.
 Lines are slightly different, since they need two coordinate pairs to
-specify the line endpoints.  These endpoints must be enclosed in
-square brackets.
-.LP
-All statements are semi-colon (;) terminated.  Multiple item statements
-accumulate.  Each definition must occur exactly once, before any
-item statements.  Comments begin with a hash (#) symbol
-and terminate with a newline.
-The coordinates are between zero and width-1 and height-1
-inclusive.  All of the exit coordinates must lie on the borders, and
+specify the line endpoints.
+These endpoints must be enclosed in square brackets.
+.Pp
+All statements are semi-colon (;) terminated.
+Multiple item statements accumulate.
+Each definition must occur exactly once, before any item statements.
+Comments begin with a hash (#) symbol and terminate with a newline.
+The coordinates are between zero and width-1 and height-1 inclusive.
+All of the exit coordinates must lie on the borders, and
 all of the beacons and airports must lie inside of the borders.
 Line endpoints may be anywhere within the field, so long as
 the lines are horizontal, vertical or
-.B "exactly diagonal."
-.SS "FIELD FILE EXAMPLE"
-.RS
-.sp
-.nf
-.TA 1i 1i
-.ta 1i 1i
+.Em exactly
+diagonal.
+.Ss FIELD FILE EXAMPLE
+.Bd -literal
 # This is the default game.
 
 update = 5;
@@ -561,28 +480,26 @@ line:             [ (  1  1 ) (  6  6 ) ]
                [ ( 11 18 ) ( 10 19 ) ]
                [ ( 13 17 ) ( 28 17 ) ]
                [ (  1  7 ) ( 11  7 ) ] ;
-.fi
-.RE
-.SH FILES
-.LP
-Files are kept in a special directory. See the OPTIONS for a way to
-print this path out.
-.TP 16
-/var/games/atc_score   Where the scores are kept.
-.TP 16
-/usr/share/games/atc/Game_List The list of playable games.
-.SH AUTHOR
-.LP
+
+.Ed
+.Sh FILES
+Files are kept in a special directory.
+See the
+.Sx OPTIONS
+section for a way to print this path out.
+It is normally
+.Pa /usr/share/games/atc .
+.Pp
+This directory contains the file
+.Pa Game_List ,
+which holds the list of playable games, as well as the games themselves.
+.Pp
+The scores are kept in
+.Pa /var/games/atc_score .
+.Sh AUTHORS
 Ed James, UC Berkeley: edjames@ucbvax.berkeley.edu, ucbvax!edjames
-.LP
+.Pp
 This game is based on someone's description of the overall flavor
 of a game written for some unknown PC many years ago, maybe.
-.SH BUGS
-.LP
+.Sh BUGS
 The screen sometimes refreshes after you have quit.
-.LP
-Yet Another Curses Bug was discovered during the development of this game.
-If your curses library clrtobot.o is version 5.1 or earlier,
-you will have erase problems with the backspace operator in the input
-window.
-
index bf6c4a3..b2f6aa1 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)backgammon.6        8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/backgammon/backgammon/backgammon.6,v 1.7.2.1 2001/07/22 11:01:21 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/backgammon/backgammon/backgammon.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:22 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/backgammon/backgammon/backgammon.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.TH BACKGAMMON 6  "May 31, 1993"
-.UC 5
-.SH NAME
-backgammon \- the game of backgammon
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B backgammon
-[ -h n r w b pr pw pb t\c
-.I term
-s\c
-.I file
-]
-.SH DESCRIPTION
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt BACKGAMMON 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm backgammon
+.Nd the game of backgammon
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl hnrwb
+.Op Fl pr
+.Op Fl pw
+.Op Fl pb
+.Op Fl t Ar term
+.Op Fl s Ar file
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
 This program lets you play backgammon against the computer
 or against a "friend".
-All commands only are one letter,
-so you don't need to type a carriage return,
+All commands are only one letter, so you don't need to type a carriage return,
 except at the end of a move.
-The program is mostly self documenting,
+The program is mostly self-explanatory,
 so that a question mark (?) will usually get some help.
 If you answer `y' when the program asks if you want the rules,
-you will get text explaining the rules of the game,
-some hints on strategy,
-instruction on how to use the program,
+you will get text explaining the rules of the game, some hints on strategy,
+instructions on how to use the program,
 and a tutorial consisting of a practice game against the computer.
 A description of how to use the program can be
 obtained by answering `y' when it asks if you want instructions.
-.PP
+.Pp
 The possible arguments for backgammon
 (most are unnecessary but some are very convenient)
 consist of:
-.ne 11
-.PP
-.na
-.TP 8
-.B -h
-Get a description of possible arguments and exit
-.TP 8
-.B -n
+.Bl -tag -width ".Fl pr"
+.It Fl h
+get a description of possible arguments and exit
+.It Fl n
 don't ask for rules or instructions
-.TP 8
-.B -r
-player is red (implies -n)
-.TP 8
-.B -w
-player is white (implies -n)
-.TP 8
-.B -b
-two players, red and white (implies -n)
-.TP 8
-.B -pr
+.It Fl r
+player is red (implies
+.Fl n )
+.It Fl w
+player is white (implies
+.Fl n )
+.It Fl b
+two players, red and white (implies
+.Fl n )
+.It Fl pr
 print the board before red's turn
-.TP 8
-.B -pw
+.It Fl pw
 print the board before white's turn
-.TP 8
-.B -pb
+.It Fl pb
 print the board before both player's turn
-.TP 8
-.B -t\fIterm
+.It Fl t Ar term
 terminal is type
-.IR term ,
-uses /etc/termcap
-.TP 8
-.B -s\fIfile
+.Ar term ,
+uses
+.Pa /usr/share/misc/termcap
+.It Fl s Ar file
 recover previously saved game from
-.IR file .
-.ad
-.PP
-.PP
+.Ar file
+.El
+.Pp
 If
-.IR term
+.Ar term
 has capabilities for direct cursor movement (see
-.IR termcap (5))
-.IR backgammon
+.Xr termcap 5 )
+.Nm
 ``fixes'' the board after each move,
 so the board does not need to be reprinted,
 unless the screen suffers some horrendous malady.
-Also, any `-p' option will be ignored.
-(The `-t' option is not necessary unless the terminal type does not match
-the entry in the /etc/termcap data base.)
-.SH QUICK\ REFERENCE
+Also, any `p' option will be ignored.
+(The `t' option is not necessary unless the terminal type does not match
+the entry in the
+.Pa /usr/share/misc/termcap
+data base.)
+.Sh QUICK REFERENCE
 When the program prompts by typing only your color,
 type a space or carriage return to roll, or
-.ne 5
-.PP
-.na
-.TP 8
-.B d
+.Bl -tag -width ".Ic s-f"
+.It Ic d
 to double
-.TP 8
-.B p
+.It Ic p
 to print the board
-.TP 8
-.B q
+.It Ic q
 to quit
-.TP 8
-.B s
+.It Ic s
 to save the game for later
-.PP
-.i0
-.ad
+.El
+.Pp
 When the program prompts with 'Move:', type
-.ne 4
-.PP
-.na
-.TP 8
-.B p
+.Bl -tag -width ".Ic s-f"
+.It Ic p
 to print the board
-.TP 8
-.B q
+.It Ic q
 to quit
-.TP 8
-.B s
+.It Ic s
 to save the game
-.ad
-.i0
-.PP
+.El
+.Pp
 or a
-.IR move ,
+.Em move ,
 which is a sequence of
-.ne 4
-.PP
-.na
-.TP 8
-.B s-f
+.Bl -tag -width ".Ic s-f"
+.It Ic s-f
 move from
-.BR s
+.Ic s
 to
-.BR f
-.TP 8
-.B s/r
+.Ic f
+.It Ic s/r
 move one man on
-.BR s
+.Ic s
 the roll
-.BR r
-.ad
-.PP
+.Ic r
 separated by commas or spaces and ending with a newline.
 Available abbreviations are
-.ne 4
-.PP
-.na
-.TP 10
-.B s-f1-f2
+.Bl -tag -width ".Ic s-f1-f2"
+.It Ic s-f1-f2
 means
-.BR s-f1,f1-f2
-.TP 10
-.B s/r1r2
+.Ic s-f1,f1-f2
+.It Ic s/r1r2
 means
-.BR s/r1,s/r2
-.ad
-.PP
-Use `b' for bar and `h' for home,
+.Ic s/r1,s/r2
+.El
+.El
+.Pp
+Use
+.Ic b
+for bar and
+.Ic h
+for home,
 or 0 or 25 as appropriate.
-.SH AUTHOR
-Alan Char
-.SH FILES
-.TP 25
-/usr/games/teachgammon
-\- rules and tutorial
-.br
-.TP 25
-/etc/termcap
-\- terminal capabilities
-.SH BUGS
+.Sh FILES
+.Bl -tag -width ".Pa /usr/share/misc/termcap" -compact
+.It Pa /usr/games/teachgammon
+rules and tutorial
+.It Pa /usr/share/misc/termcap
+terminal capabilities
+.El
+.Sh AUTHORS
+.An Alan Char
+.Sh BUGS
 The program's strategy needs much work.
index 6f3f4ef..7499c14 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)battlestar.6        8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/battlestar/battlestar.6,v 1.4.2.1 2001/07/22 11:32:34 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/battlestar/battlestar.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:22 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/battlestar/battlestar.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.TH BATTLESTAR 6 "May 31, 1993
-.UC 6
-.SH NAME
-battlestar \- a tropical adventure game
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B battlestar
-[
-.B -r (recover a saved game)
-]
-.br
-.fi
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-.I Battlestar
-is an adventure game in the classic style.  However, it's slightly less
-of a
-puzzle and more a game of exploration.  There are a few magical words
-in the game, but on the whole, simple English
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt BATTLESTAR 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm battlestar
+.Nd a tropical adventure game
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl r
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+.Nm
+is an adventure game in the classic style.
+However, it's slightly less of a puzzle and more a game of exploration.
+There are a few magical words in the game, but on the whole, simple English
 should suffice to make one's desires understandable to the parser.
-.SH "THE SETTING"
-In the days before the darkness came, when battlestars ruled the
-heavens...
-.br
-.nf
+.Sh THE SETTING
+In the days before the darkness came, when battlestars ruled the heavens...
+.Bd -literal -offset indent
+Three He made and gave them to His daughters,
+Beautiful nymphs, the goddesses of the waters.
+One to bring good luck and simple feats of wonder,
+Two to wash the lands and churn the waves asunder,
+Three to rule the world and purge the skies with thunder.
+.Ed
+.Pp
+In those times great wizards were known and their powers were beyond belief.
+They could take any object from thin air, and, uttering the word
+.Sq su
+could disappear.
+.Pp
+In those times men were known for their lust for gold and desire to
+wear fine weapons.
+Swords and coats of mail were fashioned that could withstand a laser blast.
+.Pp
+But when the darkness fell, the rightful reigns were toppled.
+Swords and helms and heads of state went rolling across the grass.
+The entire fleet of battlestars was reduced to a single ship.
+.Sh SAMPLE COMMANDS
+.Bd -literal -offset indent
+take   ---     take an object
+drop   ---     drop an object
 
-               Three He made and gave them to His daughters,
-               Beautiful nymphs, the goddesses of the waters.
-               One to bring good luck and simple feats of wonder,
-               Two to wash the lands and churn the waves asunder,
-               Three to rule the world and purge the skies with thunder.
+wear   ---     wear an object you are holding
+draw   ---     carry an object you are wearing
 
-.fi
-.PP
-In those times great wizards were known and their powers were beyond
-belief.  They could take any object from thin air, and, uttering the
-word `su' could disappear.
-.PP
-In those times men were known for their lust of gold and desire to
-wear fine weapons.  Swords and coats of mail were fashioned that could
-withstand a laser blast.
-.PP
-But when the darkness fell, the rightful reigns were toppled.  Swords
-and helms and heads of state went rolling across the grass.  The entire
-fleet of battlestars was reduced to a single ship.
-.SH "SAMPLE COMMANDS"
-.nf
+put on ---     take an object and wear it
+take off --    draw an object and drop it
 
-       take    ---     take an object
-       drop    ---     drop an object
+throw  \*[Lt]object\*[Gt] \*[Lt]direction\*[Gt]
 
-       wear    ---     wear an object you are holding
-       draw    ---     carry an object you are wearing
-
-       puton   ---     take an object and wear it
-       take off --     draw an object and drop it
-
-       throw  <object> <direction>
-
-       !       <shell esc>
-
-.fi
-.SH "IMPLIED OBJECTS"
-.nf
-
-       >-: take watermelon
-       watermelon:
-       Taken.
-       >-: eat
-       watermelon:
-       Eaten.
-       >-: take knife and sword and apple, drop all
-       knife:
-       Taken.
-       broadsword:
-       Taken.
-       apple:
-       Taken.
-       knife:
-       Dropped.
-       broadsword:
-       Dropped.
-       apple:
-       Dropped.
-       >-: get
-       knife:
-       Taken.
-
-.fi
-.PP
+!      \*[Lt]shell esc\*[Gt]
+.Ed
+.Sh IMPLIED OBJECTS
+.Bd -literal -offset indent
+\*[Gt]-: take watermelon
+watermelon:
+Taken.
+\*[Gt]-: eat
+watermelon:
+Eaten.
+\*[Gt]-: take knife and sword and apple, drop all
+knife:
+Taken.
+broadsword:
+Taken.
+apple:
+Taken.
+knife:
+Dropped.
+broadsword:
+Dropped.
+apple:
+Dropped.
+\*[Gt]-: get
+knife:
+Taken.
+.Ed
+.Pp
 Notice that the "shadow" of the next word stays around if you
-want to take advantage of it.  That is, saying "take knife" and then
-"drop"
+want to take advantage of it.
+That is, saying "take knife" and then "drop"
 will drop the knife you just took.
-.SH "SCORE & INVEN"
-The two commands "score" and "inven" will print out your current status
-in
-the game.
-.SH "SAVING A GAME"
-The command "save" will save your game in a file called "Bstar."  You
-can
-recover a saved game by using the "-r" option when you start up the
-game.
-.SH DIRECTIONS
+.Sh SCORE \*[Am] INVEN
+The two commands
+.Dq score
+and
+.Dq inven
+will print out your current status in the game.
+.Sh SAVING A GAME
+The command
+.Dq save
+will save your game in a file called
+.Pa Bstar
+in your home directory by default.
+You can recover a saved game by using the 
+.Fl r
+option when you start up the game.
+.Sh DIRECTIONS
 The compass directions N, S, E, and W can be used if you have a compass.
 If you don't have a compass, you'll have to say R, L, A, or B, which
-stand for
-Right, Left, Ahead, and Back.  Directions printed in room descriptions
-are
-always printed in R, L, A, & B relative directions.
-.SH HISTORY
+stand for Right, Left, Ahead, and Back.
+Directions printed in room descriptions are
+always printed in R, L, A, and B relative directions.
+.Sh HISTORY
 I wrote Battlestar in 1979 in order to experiment with the niceties of
 the C Language.
 Most interesting things that happen in the game are hardwired into the
-code, so don't
-send me any hate mail about it!  Instead, enjoy art for art's sake!
-.SH AUTHOR
-David Riggle
-.SH "INSPIRATION & ASSISTANCE"
+code, so don't send me any hate mail about it!
+Instead, enjoy art for art's sake!
+.Sh AUTHORS
+.An David Riggle
+.Sh INSPIRATION \*[Am] ASSISTANCE
+.Bl -item -compact
+.It
 Chris Guthrie
-.br
+.It
 Peter Da Silva
-.br
+.It
 Kevin Brown
-.br
+.It
 Edward Wang
-.br
-Ken Arnold & Company
-.SH BUGS
+.It
+Ken Arnold \*[Am] Company
+.El
+.Sh BUGS
 Countless.
-.SH "FAN MAIL"
-Send to edward%ucbarpa@Berkeley.arpa, chris%ucbcory@berkeley.arpa,
+.Sh FAN MAIL
+Send to edward%ucbarpa@berkeley.arpa, chris%ucbcory@berkeley.arpa,
 riggle.pa@xerox.arpa.
index 2c11136..2ba44d7 100644 (file)
@@ -1,44 +1,77 @@
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/bs/bs.6,v 1.1.1.1.12.1 2001/07/22 11:32:10 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/bs/bs.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:23 dillon Exp $
-.TH BATTLESHIPS 6 "Aug 23, 1989"
-.SH NAME
-bs \- battleships game
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-bs [ -b | -s ] [ -c ]
-.SH DESCRIPTION
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/bs/bs.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
+.Dd August 23, 1989
+.Dt BS 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm bs
+.Nd battleships game
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl bsc
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
 This program allows you to play the familiar Battleships game against the
-computer on a 10x10 board. The interface is visual and largely
-self-explanatory; you place your ships and pick your shots by moving the
-cursor around the `sea' with the rogue/hack motion keys hjklyubn.
-.PP
+computer on a 10x10 board.
+The interface is visual and largely self-explanatory;
+you place your ships and pick your shots by moving the
+cursor around the
+.Sq sea
+with the
+.Xr rogue 6 /
+.Xr hack 6
+motion keys
+.Dq hjklyubn .
+.Pp
 Note that when selecting a ship to place, you must type the capital letter
-(these are, after all, capital ships). During ship placement, the `r' command
-may be used to ignore the current position and randomly place your currently
-selected ship. The `R' command will place all remaining ships randomly. The ^L
-command (form feed, ASCII 12) will force a screen redraw).
-.PP
+(these are, after all, capital ships).
+During ship placement, the `r' command may be used to ignore the current
+position and randomly place your currently selected ship.
+The `R' command will place all remaining ships randomly.
+The \&^L command (form feed, ASCII 12) will force a screen redraw).
+.Pp
 The command-line arguments control game modes.
-
-.nf
-       -b selects a `blitz' variant
-       -s selects a `salvo' variant
-       -c permits ships to be placed adjacently
-.fi
-
-The `blitz' variant allows a side to shoot for as long as it continues to
-score hits.
-.PP
-The `salvo' game allows a player one shot per turn for each of his/her ships
-still afloat.  This puts a premium scoring hits early and knocking out some
+.Pp
+.Bl -tag -width ".Fl b"
+.It Fl b
+selects a
+.Dq blitz
+variant
+.It Fl s
+selects a
+.Dq salvo
+variant
+.It Fl c
+permits ships to be placed adjacently
+.El
+.Pp
+The
+.Dq blitz
+variant allows a side to shoot for as long as it continues to score hits.
+.Pp
+The
+.Dq salvo
+game allows a player one shot per turn for each of his/her ships still afloat.
+This puts a premium scoring hits early and knocking out some
 ships and also makes much harder the situation where you face a superior force
 with only your PT-boat.
-.PP
-Normally, ships must be separated by at least one square of open water. The
--c option disables this check and allows them to close-pack.
-.PP
+.Pp
+Normally, ships must be separated by at least one square of open water.
+The
+.Fl c
+option disables this check and allows them to close-pack.
+.Pp
 The algorithm the computer uses once it has found a ship to sink is provably
-optimal. The dispersion criterion for the random-fire algorithm may not be.
-.SH AUTHORS
-Originally written by one Bruce Holloway in 1986. Salvo mode added by Chuck A.
-DeGaul (cbosgd!cad). Visual user interface, `closepack' option, code rewrite
-and manual page by Eric S. Raymond <esr@snark.thyrsus.com> August 1989.
+optimal.
+The dispersion criterion for the random-fire algorithm may not be.
+.Sh AUTHORS
+.An -nosplit
+Originally written by one
+.An Bruce Holloway
+in 1986.
+Salvo mode added by
+.An Chuck A. DeGaul Aq cbosgd!cad .
+Visual user interface,
+.Sq closepack
+option, code rewrite and manual page by
+.An Eric S. Raymond Aq esr@snark.thyrsus.com
+August 1989.
index 8b6bbbc..ad97ecb 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)canfield.6  8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/canfield/canfield/canfield.6,v 1.4.2.2 2001/07/22 11:32:35 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/canfield/canfield/canfield.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:23 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/canfield/canfield/canfield.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.TH CANFIELD 6 "May 31, 1993"
-.UC 5
-.SH NAME
-canfield, cfscores \- the solitaire card game canfield
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B canfield
-.br
-.B cfscores
-.SH DESCRIPTION
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt CANFIELD 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm canfield ,
+.Nm cfscores
+.Nd the solitaire card game canfield
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Nm cfscores
+.Op Fl a
+.Op Ar user
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
 If you have never played solitaire before, it is recommended
 that you consult a solitaire instruction book. In
 Canfield, tableau cards may be built on each other downward
 in alternate colors. An entire pile must be moved as a unit
 in building. Top cards of the piles are available
 to be played on foundations, but never into empty spaces.
-.PP
+.Pp
 Spaces must be filled from the stock. The top card of
 the stock also is available to be played on foundations or
 built on tableau piles. After the stock is exhausted,
 tableau spaces may be filled from the talon and the player may
 keep them open until he wishes to use them.
-.PP
+.Pp
 Cards are dealt from the hand to the talon by threes
 and this repeats until there are no more cards in the hand
-or the player quits. To have cards dealt onto the talon the
-player types 'ht' for his move. Foundation base cards are
-also automatically moved to the foundation when they become
-available.
-.PP
-The command 'c' causes
-.I canfield
-to maintain card counting statistics
-on the bottom of the screen.
-When properly used this can greatly increase one's chances of
-winning.
-.PP
+or the player quits.
+To have cards dealt onto the talon the player types
+.Sq Ic ht
+for his move.
+Foundation base cards are also automatically moved to the foundation
+when they become available.
+.Pp
+The command
+.Sq Ic c
+causes
+.Nm
+to maintain card counting statistics on the bottom of the screen.
+When properly used this can greatly increase one's chances of winning.
+.Pp
 The rules for betting are somewhat less strict than
 those used in the official version of the game.
 The initial deal costs $13.
 You may quit at this point or inspect the game.
 Inspection costs $13 and allows you to make as many
-moves as possible without moving any cards from your hand
-to the talon.
+moves as possible without moving any cards from your hand to the talon.
 (The initial deal places three cards on the talon;
-if all these cards are used,
-three more are made available.)
+if all these cards are used, three more are made available.)
 Finally, if the game seems interesting,
 you must pay the final installment of $26.
 At this point you are
@@ -88,32 +92,41 @@ card that is moved to the foundation.
 Each run through the hand after the first costs $5.
 The card counting feature
 costs $1 for each unknown card that is identified.
-If the information is toggled on,
-you are only charged for cards
+If the information is toggled on, you are only charged for cards
 that became visible since it was last turned on.
 Thus the maximum cost of information is $34.
 Playing time is charged at a rate of $1 per minute.
-.PP
+.Pp
 With no arguments, the program
-.I cfscores
+.Nm cfscores
 prints out the current status of your canfield account.
-If a user name is specified,
-it prints out the status of their canfield account.
+If a
+.Ar user
+name is specified, it prints out the status of their canfield account.
 If the
-.B \-a
+.Fl a
 flag is specified,
 it prints out the canfield accounts for all users that have
 played the game since the database was set up.
-.SH FILES
-/usr/games/canfield    the game itself
-.br
-/usr/games/cfscores    the database printer
-.br
-/var/games/cfscores    the database of scores
-.SH BUGS
+.Sh FILES
+.Bl -tag -width ".Pa /usr/games/canfield" -compact
+.It Pa /usr/games/canfield
+the game itself
+.It Pa /usr/games/cfscores
+the database printer
+.It Pa /var/games/cfscores
+the database of scores
+.El
+.Sh AUTHORS
+.An -nosplit
+Originally written:
+.An Steve Levine
+.Pp
+Further random hacking by:
+.An Steve Feldman ,
+.An Kirk McKusick ,
+.An Mikey Olson ,
+and
+.An Eric Allman .
+.Sh BUGS
 It is impossible to cheat.
-.SH AUTHORS
-Originally written: Steve Levine
-.br
-Further random hacking by: Steve Feldman, Kirk McKusick,
-Mikey Olson, and Eric Allman.
index 4def81d..8e00fd0 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)cribbage.6  8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/cribbage/cribbage.6,v 1.3 1999/08/27 23:28:59 peter Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/cribbage/cribbage.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:23 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/cribbage/cribbage.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.TH CRIBBAGE 6 "May 31, 1993"
-.UC 4
-.SH NAME
-cribbage \- the card game cribbage
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B /usr/games/cribbage
-[
-.B \-req
-]
-.I name ...
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-.I Cribbage
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt CRIBBAGE 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm cribbage
+.Nd the card game cribbage
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl eqr
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+.Nm
 plays the card game cribbage, with the program playing one hand
-and the user the other.  The program will initially ask the user if
-the rules of the game are needed \- if so, it will print out
-the appropriate section from
-.I According to Hoyle
+and the user the other.
+The program will initially ask the user if the rules of the game are
+needed \(en if so, it will print out the appropriate section from
+.Em According to Hoyle
 with
-.I more (I).
-.PP
-.I Cribbage
+.Xr more 1 .
+.Pp
+.Nm
 options include:
-.TP
-.B \-e
+.Bl -tag -width ".Fl e"
+.It Fl e
 When the player makes a mistake scoring his hand or crib, provide an
-explanation of the correct score.  (This is especially useful for
-beginning players.)
-.TP
-.B \-q
-Print a shorter form of all messages \- this is only recommended for
+explanation of the correct score.
+(This is especially useful for beginning players.)
+.It Fl q
+Print a shorter form of all messages \(en this is only recommended for
 users who have played the game without specifying this option.
-.TP
-.B \-r
+.It Fl r
 Instead of asking the player to cut the deck, the program will randomly
 cut the deck.
-.PP
-.I Cribbage
-first asks the player whether he wishes to play a short game
-(\*(lqonce around\*(rq, to 61) or a long game (\*(lqtwice around\*(rq, to 121).  A
-response of `s' will result in a short game, any other response will
-play a long game.
-.PP
+.El
+.Pp
+.Nm
+first asks the player whether he wishes to play a short game (
+.Dq once around ,
+to 61) or a long game (
+.Dq twice around ,
+to 121).
+A response of
+.Sq Ic s
+will result in a short game, any other response will play a long game.
+.Pp
 At the start of the first game, the program
-asks the player to cut the deck to determine who gets the
-first crib.  The user should respond with a number between 0 and
-51, indicating how many cards down the deck is to be cut.  The player
-who cuts the lower ranked card gets the first crib.
+asks the player to cut the deck to determine who gets the first crib.
+The user should respond with a number between 0 and
+51, indicating how many cards down the deck is to be cut.
+The player who cuts the lower ranked card gets the first crib.
 If more than one game is played, the
 loser of the previous game gets the first crib in the current game.
-.PP
+.Pp
 For each hand, the program first prints the player's hand,
 whose crib it is, and then asks the player
-to discard two cards into the crib.  The cards are prompted for
-one per line, and are typed as explained below.
-.PP
+to discard two cards into the crib.
+The cards are prompted for one per line, and are typed as explained below.
+.Pp
 After discarding, the program cuts the deck (if it is the player's
 crib) or asks the player to cut the deck (if it's its crib); in the latter
 case, the appropriate response is a number from 0 to 39 indicating
 how far down the remaining 40 cards are to be cut.
-.PP
+.Pp
 After cutting the deck, play starts with the non-dealer (the person
 who doesn't have the crib) leading the first card.
-Play continues, as per cribbage, until all cards are exhausted.  The
-program keeps track of the scoring of all points and the total of
+Play continues, as per cribbage, until all cards are exhausted.
+The program keeps track of the scoring of all points and the total of
 the cards on the table.
-.PP
-After play, the hands are scored.  The program requests the player to
+.Pp
+After play, the hands are scored.
+The program requests the player to
 score his hand (and the crib, if it is his) by printing out the
 appropriate cards (and the cut card enclosed in brackets).
 Play continues until one player reaches the game limit (61 or 121).
-.PP
+.Pp
 A carriage return when a numeric input is expected is equivalent
 to typing the lowest legal value; when cutting the deck this
 is equivalent to choosing the top card.
-.PP
-Cards are specified as rank followed by suit.  The ranks may be specified
+.Pp
+Cards are specified as rank followed by suit.
+The ranks may be specified
 as one of:
-`a', `2', `3', `4', `5', `6', `7', `8', `9', `t', `j', `q', and `k',
-or alternatively, one of: \*(lqace\*(rq, \*(lqtwo\*(rq, \*(lqthree\*(rq, \*(lqfour\*(rq, \*(lqfive\*(rq, \*(lqsix\*(rq,
-\*(lqseven\*(rq, \*(lqeight\*(rq, \*(lqnine\*(rq, \*(lqten\*(rq, \*(lqjack\*(rq, \*(lqqueen\*(rq, and \*(lqking\*(rq.
-Suits may be specified as: `s', `h', `d', and `c', or alternatively as:
-\*(lqspades\*(rq, \*(lqhearts\*(rq, \*(lqdiamonds\*(rq, and \*(lqclubs\*(rq.
-A card may be specified as: <rank> \*(lq \*(rq <suit>, or: <rank> \*(lq of \*(rq <suit>.
+.Sq a ,
+.Sq 2 ,
+.Sq 3 ,
+.Sq 4 ,
+.Sq 5 ,
+.Sq 6 ,
+.Sq 7 ,
+.Sq 8 ,
+.Sq 9 ,
+.Sq t ,
+.Sq j ,
+.Sq q ,
+and
+.Sq k ,
+or alternatively, one of:
+.Sq ace ,
+.Sq two ,
+.Sq three ,
+.Sq four ,
+.Sq five ,
+.Sq six ,
+.Sq seven ,
+.Sq eight ,
+.Sq nine ,
+.Sq ten ,
+.Sq jack ,
+.Sq queen ,
+and
+.Sq king .
+Suits may be specified as:
+.Sq s ,
+.Sq h ,
+.Sq d ,
+and
+.Sq c ,
+or alternatively as:
+.Sq spades ,
+.Sq hearts ,
+.Sq diamonds ,
+and
+.Sq clubs .
+A card may be specified as:
+.Dq Ao rank Ac \  Aq suit ,
+or:
+.Dq Ao rank Ac of Aq suit .
 If the single letter rank and suit designations are used, the space
-separating the suit and rank may be left out.  Also, if only one card
+separating the suit and rank may be left out.
+Also, if only one card
 of the desired rank is playable, typing the rank is sufficient.
-For example, if your hand was \*(lq2H, 4D, 5C, 6H, JC, KD\*(rq and it was
-desired to discard the king of diamonds, any of the following could be typed:
-\*(lqk\*(rq, \*(lqking\*(rq, \*(lqkd\*(rq, \*(lqk d\*(rq, \*(lqk of d\*(rq, \*(lqking d\*(rq, \*(lqking of d\*(rq, \*(lqk diamonds\*(rq,
-\*(lqk of diamonds\*(rq, \*(lqking diamonds\*(rq, or \*(lqking of diamonds\*(rq.
-.SH FILES
-.ta 2i
-/usr/games/cribbage
-.SH AUTHORS
-Earl T. Cohen wrote the logic.
-Ken Arnold added the screen oriented interface.
+For example, if your hand was
+.Dq 2H, 4D, 5C, 6H, JC, and KD
+and it was desired to discard the king of diamonds, any of
+the following could be typed:
+.Sq k ,
+.Sq king ,
+.Sq kd ,
+.Sq k d ,
+.Sq k of d ,
+.Sq king d ,
+.Sq king of d ,
+.Sq k diamonds ,
+.Sq k of diamonds ,
+.Sq king diamonds ,
+.Sq king of diamonds .
+.Sh FILES
+.Bl -tag -width ".Pa /usr/share/games/cribbage.instr" -compact
+.It Pa /usr/games/cribbage
+.It Pa /var/games/criblog
+.It Pa /usr/share/games/cribbage.instr
+.El
+.Sh AUTHORS
+.An -nosplit
+.An Earl T. Cohen
+wrote the logic.
+.An Ken Arnold
+added the screen oriented interface.
index e39ec4e..aedc88b 100644 (file)
 .\"
 .\"    @(#)fish.6      8.1 (Berkeley) 5/31/93
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/fish/fish.6,v 1.3 1999/08/27 23:29:02 peter Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/fish/fish.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:23 dillon Exp $
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/fish/fish.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
 .\"
-.TH FISH 6 "May 31, 1993"
-.UC 4
-.SH NAME
-fish \- play ``Go Fish''
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.ft B
-fish [\-p]
-.ft R
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-.I Fish
+.Dd May 31, 1993
+.Dt FISH 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm fish
+.Nd play
+.Dq Go Fish
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl p
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+.Nm
 is the game
-.IR "Go Fish" ,
+.Dq Go Fish ,
 a traditional children's card game.
-.PP
+.Pp
 The computer deals the player and itself seven cards, and places
 the rest of the deck face-down (figuratively).
-The object of the game is to collect ``books'', or all of the members
-of a single rank.
-For example, collecting four 2's would give the player a ``book of
-2's''.
-.PP
+The object of the game is to collect
+.Dq books ,
+or all of the members of a single rank.
+For example, collecting four 2's would give the player a
+.Dq book of 2's .
+.Pp
 The options are as follows:
-.TP
-\-p
+.Bl -tag -width ".Fl p"
+.It Fl p
 Professional mode.
-.PP
+.El
+.Pp
 The computer makes a random decision as to who gets to start the
 game, and then the computer and player take turns asking each other
 for cards of a specified rank.
@@ -67,20 +71,21 @@ them up to the asking player.
 A player must have at least one of the cards of the rank they request
 in their hand.
 When a player asks for a rank of which the other player has no
-cards, the asker is told to ``Go Fish!''.
+cards, the asker is told to
+.Dq Go Fish! .
 Then, the asker draws a card from the non-dealt cards.
 If they draw the card they asked for, they continue their turn, asking
 for more ranks from the other player.
 Otherwise, the other player gets a turn.
-.PP
+.Pp
 When a player completes a book, either by getting cards from the
 other player or drawing from the deck, they set those cards aside and
 the rank is no longer in play.
-.PP
+.Pp
 The game ends when either player no longer has any cards in their hand.
 The player with the most books wins.
-.PP
-.I Fish
+.Pp
+.Nm
 provides instructions as to what input it accepts.
-.SH BUGS
+.Sh BUGS
 The computer cheats only rarely.
index 5cd1f88..2c87349 100644 (file)
 .\" $FreeBSD: src/games/hack/hack.6,v 1.2.8.1 2001/07/22 11:01:22 dd Exp $
-.\" $DragonFly: src/games/hack/hack.6,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:25:24 dillon Exp $
-.TH HACK 6 "31 March 1985"
-.UC 4
-.SH NAME
-hack \- exploring The Dungeons of Doom
-.SH SYNOPSIS
-.B /usr/games/hack
-[
-.B \-d
-.I directory
-]
-[
-.B \-n
-]
-[
-.B \-u
-.I playername
-]
-.br
-.B /usr/games/hack
-[
-.B \-d
-.I directory
-]
-.B \-s
-[
-.B \-X
-]
-[
-.I playernames
-]
-.SH DESCRIPTION
-.I Hack
-is a display oriented dungeons & dragons - like game.
+.\" $DragonFly: src/games/hack/hack.6,v 1.3 2007/03/11 19:05:31 swildner Exp $
+.Dd March 31, 1985
+.Dt HACK 6
+.Os
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm hack
+.Nd exploring The Dungeons of Doom
+.Sh SYNOPSIS
+.Nm
+.Op Fl d Ar directory
+.Op Fl n
+.Op Fl u Ar playername
+.Nm
+.Op Fl d Ar directory
+.Op Fl s
+.Op Fl X
+.Op Ar playername ...
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+.Nm
+is a display oriented dungeons \*[Am] dragons-like game.
 Both display and command structure resemble rogue.
 (For a game with the same structure but entirely different display -
 a real cave instead of dull rectangles - try Quest.)
-.PP
-To get started you really only need to know two commands.  The command
-.B ?
+.Pp
+To get started you really only need to know two commands.
+The command
+.Ic \&?
 will give you a list of the available commands and the command
-.B /
+.Ic /
 will identify the things you see on the screen.
-.PP
-To win the game (as opposed to merely playing to beat other people high
+.Pp
+To win the game (as opposed to merely playing to beat other people's high
 scores) you must locate the Amulet of Yendor which is somewhere below
-the 20th level of the dungeon and get it out.  Nobody has achieved this
-yet and if somebody does, he will probably go down in history as a hero
-among heroes.
-.PP
+the 20th level of the dungeon and get it out.
+Nobody has achieved this yet and if somebody does, he will probably go
+down in history as a hero among heroes.
+.Pp
 When the game ends, either by your death, when you quit, or if you escape
 from the caves,
-.I hack
-will give you (a fragment of) the list of top scorers.  The scoring
-is based on many aspects of your behavior but a rough estimate is
-obtained by taking the amount of gold you've found in the cave plus four
-times your (real) experience. Precious stones may be worth a lot of gold
-when brought to the exit.
+.Nm
+will give you (a fragment of) the list of top scorers.
+The scoring is based on many aspects of your behavior but a rough estimate
+is obtained by taking the amount of gold you've found in the cave plus four
+times your (real) experience.
+Precious stones may be worth a lot of gold when brought to the exit.
 There is a 10% penalty for getting yourself killed.
-.PP
+.Pp
 The administration of the game is kept in the directory specified with the
-.B \-d
+.Fl d
 option, or, if no such option is given, in the directory specified by
-the environment variable HACKDIR, or, if no such variable exists, in
-the current directory. This same directory contains several auxiliary
-files such as lockfiles and the list of top scorers and a subdirectory
-.I save
+the environment variable
+.Ev HACKDIR ,
+or, if no such variable exists, in the current directory.
+This same directory contains several auxiliary files such as lockfiles and
+the list of topscorers and a subdirectory
+.Pa save
 where games are saved.
 The game administrator may however choose to install hack with a fixed
-playing ground, usually /usr/games/lib/hackdir.
-.PP
+playing ground, usually
+.Pa /var/games/hackdir .
+.Pp
 The
-.B \-n
+.Fl n
 option suppresses printing of the news.
-.PP
+.Pp
 The
-.B \-u
-.I playername
+.Fl u Ar playername
 option supplies the answer to the question "Who are you?".
 When
-.I playername
+.Ar playername
 has as suffix one of
-.B \-T \-S \-K \-F \-C \-W
+.Em -T ,
+.Em -S ,
+.Em -K ,
+.Em -F ,
+.Em -C ,
+or
+.Em -W ,
 then this supplies the answer to the question "What kind of character ... ?".
-.PP
+.Pp
 The
-.B \-s
-option will print out the list of your scores. It may be followed by arguments
-.B \-X
+.Fl s
+option will print out the list of your scores.
+It may be followed by arguments
+.Fl X
 where X is one of the letters C, F, K, S, T, W to print the scores of
 Cavemen, Fighters, Knights, Speleologists, Tourists or Wizards.
 It may also be followed by one or more player names to print the scores of the
 players mentioned.
-.SH AUTHORS
+.Sh ENVIRONMENT
+.Bl -tag -width 24n -compact
+.It Ev USER No or Ev LOGNAME
+Your login name.
+.It Ev HOME
+Your home directory.
+.It Ev SHELL
+Your shell.
+.It Ev TERM
+The type of your terminal.
+.It Ev HACKPAGER, PAGER
+Pager used instead of default pager.
+.It Ev MAIL
+Mailbox file.
+.It Ev MAILREADER
+Reader used instead of default (probably
+.Pa /usr/bin/mail ) .
+.It Ev HACKDIR
+Playground.
+.It Ev HACKOPTIONS
+String predefining several hack options (see help file).
+.El
+.Pp
+Several other environment variables are used in debugging (wizard) mode,
+like
+.Ev GENOCIDED ,
+.Ev INVENT ,
+.Ev MAGIC
+and
+.Ev SHOPTYPE .
+.Sh FILES
+.Bl -tag -width 24n -compact
+.It Pa hack
+The hack program.
+.It Pa data, rumors
+Data files used by hack.
+.It Pa help, hh
+Help data files.
+.It Pa record
+The list of topscorers.
+.It Pa save
+A subdirectory containing the saved games.
+.It Pa bones_dd
+Descriptions of the ghost and belongings of a deceased adventurer.
+.It Pa xlock.dd
+Description of a dungeon level.
+.It Pa safelock
+Lock file for xlock.
+.It Pa record_lock
+Lock file for record.
+.El
+.Sh AUTHORS
 Jay Fenlason (+ Kenny Woodland, Mike Thome and Jon Payne) wrote the
 original hack, very much like rogue (but full of bugs).
-.br
+.Pp
 Andries Brouwer continuously deformed their sources into the current
 version - in fact an entirely different game.
-.SH FILES
-.DT
-.ta \w'data, rumors\ \ \ 'u
-hack   The hack program.
-.br
-data, rumors   Data files used by hack.
-.br
-help, hh       Help data files.
-.br
-record The list of top scorers.
-.br
-save   A subdirectory containing the saved
-.br
-       games.
-.br
-bones_dd       Descriptions of the ghost and
-.br
-       belongings of a deceased adventurer.
-.br
-xlock.dd       Description of a dungeon level.
-.br
-safelock       Lock file for xlock.
-.br
-record_lock    Lock file for record.
-.SH ENVIRONMENT
-.DT
-.ta \w'HACKPAGER, PAGER\ \ \ 'u
-USER or LOGNAME        Your login name.
-.br
-HOME           Your home directory.
-.br
-SHELL          Your shell.
-.br
-TERM           The type of your terminal.
-.br
-HACKPAGER, PAGER       Pager used instead of default pager.
-.br
-MAIL   Mailbox file.
-.br
-MAILREADER     Reader used instead of default.
-.br
-HACKDIR        Playground.
-.br
-HACKOPTIONS    String predefining several hack options
-.br
-       (see help file).
-.br
-
-Several other environment variables are used in debugging (wizard) mode,
-like GENOCIDED, INVENT, MAGIC and SHOPTYPE.
-.SH BUGS
+.Sh BUGS
 Probably infinite.
 Mail complaints to mcvax!aeb .