Clean up the code in bin/ to reduce warnings from GCC3.
[dragonfly.git] / bin / date / date.1
1 .\" Copyright (c) 1980, 1990, 1993
2 .\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
3 .\"
4 .\" This code is derived from software contributed to Berkeley by
5 .\" the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
6 .\"
7 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
8 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
9 .\" are met:
10 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
11 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
12 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
13 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
14 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
15 .\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
16 .\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
17 .\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
18 .\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
19 .\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
20 .\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
21 .\"    without specific prior written permission.
22 .\"
23 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
24 .\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
25 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
26 .\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
27 .\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
28 .\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
29 .\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
30 .\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
31 .\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
32 .\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
33 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
34 .\"
35 .\"     @(#)date.1      8.3 (Berkeley) 4/28/95
36 .\" $FreeBSD: src/bin/date/date.1,v 1.34.2.15 2003/02/24 03:01:00 trhodes Exp $
37 .\" $DragonFly: src/bin/date/date.1,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:22:49 dillon Exp $
38 .\"
39 .Dd November 17, 1993
40 .Dt DATE 1
41 .Os
42 .Sh NAME
43 .Nm date
44 .Nd display or set date and time
45 .Sh SYNOPSIS
46 .Nm
47 .Op Fl jnu
48 .Op Fl d Ar dst
49 .Op Fl r Ar seconds
50 .Op Fl t Ar minutes_west
51 .Oo
52 .Fl v
53 .Sm off
54 .Op Cm + | -
55 .Ar val Op Ar ymwdHMS
56 .Sm on
57 .Oc
58 .Ar ...
59 .Oo
60 .Fl f
61 .Ar fmt date |
62 .Sm off
63 .Op Oo Oo Oo Oo Ar cc Oc Ar yy Oc Ar mm Oc Ar dd Oc Ar HH
64 .Ar MM Op Ar .ss
65 .Sm on
66 .Oc
67 .Op Cm + Ns Ar format
68 .Sh DESCRIPTION
69 When invoked without arguments, the
70 .Nm
71 utility displays the current date and time.
72 Otherwise, depending on the options specified,
73 .Nm
74 will set the date and time or print it in a user-defined way.
75 .Pp
76 The
77 .Nm
78 utility displays the date and time read from the kernel clock.
79 When used to set the date and time,
80 both the kernel clock and the hardware clock are updated.
81 .Pp
82 Only the superuser may set the date,
83 and if the system securelevel (see
84 .Xr securelevel 8 )
85 is greater than 1,
86 the time may not be changed by more than 1 second.
87 .Pp
88 The options are as follows:
89 .Bl -tag -width Ds
90 .It Fl d Ar dst
91 Set the kernel's value for daylight saving time.
92 If
93 .Ar dst
94 is non-zero, future calls
95 to
96 .Xr gettimeofday 2
97 will return a non-zero for
98 .Fa tz_dsttime  .
99 .It Fl f
100 Use
101 .Ar fmt
102 as the format string to parse the
103 .Ar date
104 provided rather than using the default
105 .Sm off
106 .Oo Oo Oo Oo Oo
107 .Ar cc Oc
108 .Ar yy Oc
109 .Ar mm Oc
110 .Ar dd Oc
111 .Ar HH
112 .Oc Ar MM Op Ar .ss
113 .Sm on
114 format.
115 Parsing is done using
116 .Xr strptime 3 .
117 .It Fl j
118 Do not try to set the date.
119 This allows you to use the
120 .Fl f
121 flag in addition to the
122 .Cm +
123 option to convert one date format to another.
124 .It Fl n
125 By default, if the
126 .Xr timed 8
127 daemon is running,
128 .Nm
129 sets the time on all of the machines in the local group.
130 The
131 .Fl n
132 option suppresses this behavior and causes the time to be set only on the
133 current machine.
134 .It Fl r Ar seconds
135 Print the date and time represented by
136 .Ar seconds ,
137 where
138 .Ar seconds
139 is the number of seconds since the Epoch
140 (00:00:00 UTC, January 1, 1970;
141 see
142 .Xr time 3 ) ,
143 and can be specified in decimal, octal, or hex.
144 .It Fl t Ar minutes_west
145 Set the system's value for minutes west of
146 .Tn GMT .
147 .Ar minutes_west
148 specifies the number of minutes returned in
149 .Fa tz_minuteswest
150 by future calls to
151 .Xr gettimeofday 2 .
152 .It Fl u
153 Display or set the date in
154 .Tn UTC
155 (Coordinated Universal) time.
156 .It Fl v
157 Adjust (i.e., take the current date and display the result of the
158 adjustment; not actually set the date) the second, minute, hour, month
159 day, week day, month or year according to
160 .Ar val .
161 If
162 .Ar val
163 is preceded with a plus or minus sign,
164 the date is adjusted forwards or backwards according to the remaining string,
165 otherwise the relevant part of the date is set.
166 The date can be adjusted as many times as required using these flags.
167 Flags are processed in the order given.
168 .Pp
169 When setting values
170 (rather than adjusting them),
171 seconds are in the range 0-59, minutes are in the range 0-59, hours are
172 in the range 0-23, month days are in the range 1-31, week days are in the
173 range 0-6 (Sun-Sat),
174 months are in the range 1-12 (Jan-Dec)
175 and years are in the range 80-38 or 1980-2038.
176 .Pp
177 If
178 .Ar val
179 is numeric, one of either
180 .Ar y ,
181 .Ar m ,
182 .Ar w ,
183 .Ar d ,
184 .Ar H ,
185 .Ar M
186 or
187 .Ar S
188 must be used to specify which part of the date is to be adjusted.
189 .Pp
190 The week day or month may be specified using a name rather than a
191 number.
192 If a name is used with the plus
193 (or minus)
194 sign, the date will be put forwards
195 (or backwards)
196 to the next
197 (previous)
198 date that matches the given week day or month.
199 This will not adjust the date,
200 if the given week day or month is the same as the current one.
201 .Pp
202 When a date is adjusted to a specific value or in units greater than hours,
203 daylight savings time considerations are ignored.
204 Adjustments in units of hours or less honor daylight saving time.
205 So, assuming the current date is March 26, 0:30 and that the DST adjustment
206 means that the clock goes forward at 01:00 to 02:00, using
207 .Fl v No +1H
208 will adjust the date to March 26, 2:30.
209 Likewise, if the date is October 29, 0:30 and the DST adjustment means that
210 the clock goes back at 02:00 to 01:00, using
211 .Fl v No +3H
212 will be necessary to reach October 29, 2:30.
213 .Pp
214 When the date is adjusted to a specific value that doesn't actually exist
215 (for example March 26, 1:30 BST 2000 in the Europe/London timezone),
216 the date will be silently adjusted forwards in units of one hour until it
217 reaches a valid time.
218 When the date is adjusted to a specific value that occurs twice
219 (for example October 29, 1:30 2000),
220 the resulting timezone will be set so that the date matches the earlier of
221 the two times.
222 .Pp
223 Refer to the examples below for further details.
224 .El
225 .Pp
226 An operand with a leading plus
227 .Pq Sq +
228 sign signals a user-defined format string
229 which specifies the format in which to display the date and time.
230 The format string may contain any of the conversion specifications
231 described in the
232 .Xr strftime 3
233 manual page, as well as any arbitrary text.
234 A newline
235 .Pq Ql \en
236 character is always output after the characters specified by
237 the format string.
238 The format string for the default display is
239 .Dq +%+ .
240 .Pp
241 If an operand does not have a leading plus sign, it is interpreted as
242 a value for setting the system's notion of the current date and time.
243 The canonical representation for setting the date and time is:
244 .Pp
245 .Bl -tag -width Ds -compact -offset indent
246 .It Ar cc
247 Century
248 (either 19 or 20)
249 prepended to the abbreviated year.
250 .It Ar yy
251 Year in abbreviated form
252 (e.g. 89 for 1989, 06 for 2006).
253 .It Ar mm
254 Numeric month, a number from 1 to 12.
255 .It Ar dd
256 Day, a number from 1 to 31.
257 .It Ar HH
258 Hour, a number from 0 to 23.
259 .It Ar MM
260 Minutes, a number from 0 to 59.
261 .It Ar ss
262 Seconds, a number from 0 to 61
263 (59 plus a maximum of two leap seconds).
264 .El
265 .Pp
266 Everything but the minutes is optional.
267 .Pp
268 Time changes for Daylight Saving Time, standard time, leap seconds,
269 and leap years are handled automatically.
270 .Sh EXAMPLES
271 The command:
272 .Pp
273 .Dl "date ""+DATE: %Y-%m-%d%nTIME: %H:%M:%S"""
274 .Pp
275 will display:
276 .Bd -literal -offset indent
277 DATE: 1987-11-21
278 TIME: 13:36:16
279 .Ed
280 .Pp
281 In the Europe/London timezone, the command:
282 .Pp
283 .Dl "date -v1m -v+1y"
284 .Pp
285 will display:
286 .Pp
287 .Dl "Sun Jan  4 04:15:24 GMT 1998"
288 .Pp
289 where it is currently Mon Aug  4 04:15:24 BST 1997.
290 .Pp
291 The command:
292 .Pp
293 .Dl "date -v1d -v3m -v0y -v-1d"
294 .Pp
295 will display the last day of February in the year 2000:
296 .Pp
297 .Dl "Tue Feb 29 03:18:00 GMT 2000"
298 .Pp
299 The command:
300 .Pp
301 .Dl "date -v1d -v+1m -v-1d -v-fri"
302 .Pp
303 will display the last Friday of the month:
304 .Pp
305 .Dl "Fri Aug 29 04:31:11 BST 1997"
306 .Pp
307 where it is currently Mon Aug  4 04:31:11 BST 1997.
308 .Pp
309 The command:
310 .Pp
311 .Dl "date 8506131627"
312 .Pp
313 sets the date to
314 .Dq Li "June 13, 1985, 4:27 PM" .
315 .Pp
316 .Dl "date ""+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S"""
317 .Pp
318 may be used on one machine to print out the date
319 suitable for setting on another.
320 .Pp
321 The command:
322 .Pp
323 .Dl "date 1432"
324 .Pp
325 sets the time to
326 .Li "2:32 PM" ,
327 without modifying the date.
328 .Sh ENVIRONMENT
329 The following environment variables affect the execution of
330 .Nm :
331 .Bl -tag -width Ds
332 .It Ev TZ
333 The timezone to use when displaying dates.
334 The normal format is a pathname relative to
335 .Pa /usr/share/zoneinfo .
336 For example, the command
337 .Dq TZ=America/Los_Angeles date
338 displays the current time in California.
339 See
340 .Xr environ 7
341 for more information.
342 .El
343 .Sh FILES
344 .Bl -tag -width /var/log/messages -compact
345 .It Pa /var/log/wtmp
346 record of date resets and time changes
347 .It Pa /var/log/messages
348 record of the user setting the time
349 .El
350 .Sh SEE ALSO
351 .Xr gettimeofday 2 ,
352 .Xr strftime 3 ,
353 .Xr strptime 3 ,
354 .Xr utmp 5 ,
355 .Xr timed 8
356 .Rs
357 .%T "TSP: The Time Synchronization Protocol for UNIX 4.3BSD"
358 .%A R. Gusella
359 .%A S. Zatti
360 .Re
361 .Sh DIAGNOSTICS
362 The
363 .Nm
364 utility exits 0 on success, 1 if unable to set the date, and 2
365 if able to set the local date, but unable to set it globally.
366 .Pp
367 Occasionally, when
368 .Xr timed 8
369 synchronizes the time on many hosts, the setting of a new time value may
370 require more than a few seconds.
371 On these occasions,
372 .Nm
373 prints:
374 .Ql Network time being set .
375 The message
376 .Ql Communication error with timed
377 occurs when the communication
378 between
379 .Nm
380 and
381 .Xr timed 8
382 fails.
383 .Sh STANDARDS
384 The
385 .Nm
386 utility is expected to be compatible with
387 .St -p1003.2 .
388 .Sh HISTORY
389 A
390 .Nm
391 command appeared in
392 .At v1 .