Add the DragonFly cvs id and perform general cleanups on cvs/rcs/sccs ids. Most
[dragonfly.git] / contrib / nvi / docs / internals / quoting
1 #       @(#)quoting     5.5 (Berkeley) 11/12/94
2
3 QUOTING IN EX/VI:
4
5 There are four escape characters in historic ex/vi:
6
7         \ (backslashes)
8         ^V
9         ^Q (assuming it wasn't used for IXON/IXOFF)
10         The terminal literal next character.
11
12 Vi did not use the lnext character, it always used ^V (or ^Q).
13 ^V and ^Q were equivalent in all cases for vi.
14
15 There are four different areas in ex/vi where escaping characters
16 is interesting:
17
18         1: In vi text input mode.
19         2: In vi command mode.
20         3: In ex command and text input modes.
21         4: In the ex commands themselves.
22
23 1: Vi text input mode (a, i, o, :colon commands, etc.):
24
25    The set of characters that users might want to escape are as follows.
26    As ^L and ^Z were not special in input mode, they are not listed.
27
28         carriage return (^M)
29         escape          (^[)
30         autoindents     (^D, 0, ^, ^T)
31         erase           (^H)
32         word erase      (^W)
33         line erase      (^U)
34         newline         (^J)            (not historic practice)
35
36    Historic practice was that ^V was the only way to escape any
37    of these characters, and that whatever character followed
38    the ^V was taken literally, e.g. ^V^V is a single ^V.  I
39    don't see any strong reason to make it possible to escape
40    ^J, so I'm going to leave that alone.
41
42    One comment regarding the autoindent characters.  In historic
43    vi, if you entered "^V0^D" autoindent erasure was still
44    triggered, although it wasn't if you entered "0^V^D".  In
45    nvi, if you escape either character, autoindent erasure is
46    not triggered.
47
48    Abbreviations were not performed if the non-word character
49    that triggered the abbreviation was escaped by a ^V.  Input
50    maps were not triggered if any part of the map was escaped
51    by a ^V.
52
53    The historic vi implementation for the 'r' command requires
54    two leading ^V's to replace a character with a literal
55    character.  This is obviously a bug, and should be fixed.
56
57 2: Vi command mode
58
59    Command maps were not triggered if the second or later
60    character of a map was escaped by a ^V.
61
62    The obvious extension is that ^V should keep the next command
63    character from being mapped, so you can do ":map x xxx" and
64    then enter ^Vx to delete a single character.
65
66 3: Ex command and text input modes.
67
68    As ex ran in canonical mode, there was little work that it
69    needed to do for quoting.  The notable differences between
70    ex and vi are that it was possible to escape a <newline> in
71    the ex command and text input modes, and ex used the "literal
72    next" character, not control-V/control-Q.
73
74 4: The ex commands:
75
76    Ex commands are delimited by '|' or newline characters.
77    Within the commands, whitespace characters delimit the
78    arguments.  Backslash will generally escape any following
79    character.  In the abbreviate, unabbreviate, map and unmap
80    commands, control-V escapes the next character, instead.
81
82    This is historic behavior in vi, although there are special
83    cases where it's impossible to escape a character, generally
84    a whitespace character.
85
86    Escaping characters in file names in ex commands:
87
88         :cd [directory]                         (directory)
89         :chdir [directory]                      (directory)
90         :edit [+cmd] [file]                     (file)
91         :ex [+cmd] [file]                       (file)
92         :file [file]                            (file)
93         :next [file ...]                        (file ...)
94         :read [!cmd | file]                     (file)
95         :source [file]                          (file)
96         :write [!cmd | file]                    (file)
97         :wq [file]                              (file)
98         :xit [file]                             (file)
99
100    Since file names are also subject to word expansion, the
101    underlying shell had better be doing the correct backslash
102    escaping.  This is NOT historic behavior in vi, making it
103    impossible to insert a whitespace, newline or carriage return
104    character into a file name.
105
106 4: Escaping characters in non-file arguments in ex commands:
107
108         :abbreviate word string                 (word, string)
109 *       :edit [+cmd] [file]                     (+cmd)
110 *       :ex [+cmd] [file]                       (+cmd)
111         :map word string                        (word, string)
112 *       :set [option ...]                       (option)
113 *       :tag string                             (string)
114         :unabbreviate word                      (word)
115         :unmap word                             (word)
116
117    These commands use whitespace to delimit their arguments, and use
118    ^V to escape those characters.  The exceptions are starred in the
119    above list, and are discussed below.
120
121    In general, I intend to treat a ^V in any argument, followed by
122    any character, as that literal character.  This will permit
123    editing of files name "foo|", for example, by using the string
124    "foo\^V|", where the literal next character protects the pipe
125    from the ex command parser and the backslash protects it from the
126    shell expansion.
127
128    This is backward compatible with historical vi, although there
129    were a number of special cases where vi wasn't consistent.
130
131 4.1: The edit/ex commands:
132
133    The edit/ex commands are a special case because | symbols may
134    occur in the "+cmd" field, for example:
135
136         :edit +10|s/abc/ABC/ file.c
137
138    In addition, the edit and ex commands have historically
139    ignored literal next characters in the +cmd string, so that
140    the following command won't work.
141
142         :edit +10|s/X/^V / file.c
143
144    I intend to handle the literal next character in edit/ex consistently
145    with how it is handled in other commands.
146
147    More fun facts to know and tell:
148         The acid test for the ex/edit commands:
149
150                 date > file1; date > file2
151                 vi
152                 :edit +1|s/./XXX/|w file1| e file2|1 | s/./XXX/|wq
153
154         No version of vi, of which I'm aware, handles it.
155
156 4.2: The set command:
157
158    The set command treats ^V's as literal characters, so the
159    following command won't work.  Backslashes do work in this
160    case, though, so the second version of the command does work.
161
162         set tags=tags_file1^V tags_file2
163         set tags=tags_file1\ tags_file2
164
165    I intend to continue permitting backslashes in set commands,
166    but to also permit literal next characters to work as well.
167    This is backward compatible, but will also make set
168    consistent with the other commands.  I think it's unlikely
169    to break any historic .exrc's, given that there are probably
170    very few files with ^V's in their name.
171
172 4.3: The tag command:
173
174    The tag command ignores ^V's and backslashes; there's no way to
175    get a space into a tag name.
176
177    I think this is a don't care, and I don't intend to fix it.
178
179 5: Regular expressions:
180
181         :global /pattern/ command
182         :substitute /pattern/replace/
183         :vglobal /pattern/ command
184
185    I intend to treat a backslash in the pattern, followed by the
186    delimiter character or a backslash, as that literal character.
187
188    This is historic behavior in vi.  It would get rid of a fairly
189    hard-to-explain special case if we could just use the character
190    immediately following the backslash in all cases, or, if we
191    changed nvi to permit using the literal next character as a
192    pattern escape character, but that would probably break historic
193    scripts.
194
195    There is an additional escaping issue for regular expressions.
196    Within the pattern and replacement, the '|' character did not
197    delimit ex commands.  For example, the following is legal.
198
199         :substitute /|/PIPE/|s/P/XXX/
200
201    This is a special case that I will support.
202
203 6: Ending anything with an escape character:
204
205    In all of the above rules, an escape character (either ^V or a
206    backslash) at the end of an argument or file name is not handled
207    specially, but used as a literal character.
208