Cleanup remaining tsleep priority issues.
[dragonfly.git] / share / man / man9 / spl.9
1 .\"
2 .\" Copyright (c) 1996 Joerg Wunsch
3 .\"
4 .\" All rights reserved.
5 .\"
6 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
7 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
8 .\" are met:
9 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
10 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
11 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
12 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
13 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
14 .\"
15 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE DEVELOPERS ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR
16 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
17 .\" OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
18 .\" IN NO EVENT SHALL THE DEVELOPERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
19 .\" INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
20 .\" NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
21 .\" DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
22 .\" THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
23 .\" (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
24 .\" THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
25 .\"
26 .\" $FreeBSD: src/share/man/man9/spl.9,v 1.8.2.5 2001/12/17 11:30:19 ru Exp $
27 .\" $DragonFly: src/share/man/man9/Attic/spl.9,v 1.3 2003/08/01 17:46:25 dillon Exp $
28 .\"
29 .Dd July 21, 1996
30 .Os
31 .Dt SPL 9
32 .Sh NAME
33 .Nm splbio ,
34 .Nm splclock ,
35 .Nm splhigh ,
36 .Nm splimp ,
37 .Nm splnet ,
38 .Nm splsoftclock ,
39 .Nm splsofttty ,
40 .Nm splstatclock ,
41 .Nm spltty ,
42 .Nm splvm ,
43 .Nm spl0 ,
44 .Nm splx
45 .Nd manipulate interrupt priorities
46 .Sh SYNOPSIS
47 .In sys/types.h
48 .In sys/systm.h
49 .Ft intrmask_t
50 .Fn splbio "void"
51 .Ft intrmask_t
52 .Fn splclock "void"
53 .Ft intrmask_t
54 .Fn splhigh "void"
55 .Ft intrmask_t
56 .Fn splimp "void"
57 .Ft intrmask_t
58 .Fn splnet "void"
59 .Ft intrmask_t
60 .Fn splsoftclock "void"
61 .Ft intrmask_t
62 .Fn splsofttty "void"
63 .Ft intrmask_t
64 .Fn splstatclock "void"
65 .Ft intrmask_t
66 .Fn spltty "void"
67 .Ft void
68 .Fn spl0 "void"
69 .Ft void
70 .Fn splx "intrmask_t ipl"
71 .Sh DESCRIPTION
72 The
73 .Fn spl
74 function family sets the interrupt priority
75 .Dq level
76 of the CPU.
77 This prevents interrupt handlers of the blocked priority level from
78 being run.  This is used in the
79 .Dq synchronous
80 part of a driver (the part that runs on behalf of the user process) to
81 examine or modify data areas that might be examined or modified by
82 interrupt handlers.
83 .Pp
84 Each driver that uses interrupts is normally assigned to an interrupt
85 priority group by a keyword in its config line.
86 For example:
87 .Bd -literal -offset indent
88 device foo0 at isa? port 0x0815 irq 12 tty
89 .Ed
90 .Pp
91 assigns interrupt 12 to the
92 .Dq tty
93 priority group.  The system automatically arranges for interrupts in
94 the
95 .Em xxx
96 group to be called at a priority >=
97 .Ns spl Ns Em xxx
98 \&().
99 .Pp
100 The function
101 .Fn splx
102 sets the interrupt priority to an absolute value.  The intent is that
103 the value returned by the other functions should be saved in a local
104 variable, and later passed to
105 .Fn splx
106 in order to restore the previous priority.
107 .Pp
108 The function
109 .Fn spl0
110 lowers the priority to a value where all interrupt handlers are
111 unblocked, but ASTs (asynchronous system traps) remain blocked until
112 the system is about to return to user mode.
113 .Pp
114 The traditional assignment of the various device drivers to the
115 interrupt priority groups can be roughly classified as:
116 .Bl -tag -width Fn
117 .It Fn splnet
118 All network interface drivers.
119 .It Fn splbio
120 All
121 .Em buffered IO
122 (i.e., disk and the like) drivers.
123 .It Fn spltty
124 Basically, all non-network communications devices, but effectively
125 used for all drivers that are neither network nor disks.
126 .El
127 .Sh RETURN VALUES
128 All functions except
129 .Fn splx
130 and
131 .Fn spl0
132 return the previous priority value.
133 .Sh EXAMPLES
134 This is a typical example demonstrating the usage:
135 .Bd -literal
136 struct foo_softc {
137         ...
138         int flags;
139 #define FOO_ASLEEP      1
140 #define FOO_READY       2
141
142 } foo_softc[NFOO];
143
144 int
145 foowrite(...)
146 {
147         struct foo_softc *sc;
148         int s, error;
149
150         ...
151         s = spltty();
152         if (!(sc->flags & FOO_READY)) {
153                 /* Not ready, must sleep on resource. */
154                 sc->flags |= FOO_ASLEEP;
155                 error = tsleep(sc, 0, "foordy", 0);
156                 sc->flags &= ~FOO_ASLEEP;
157         }
158         sc->flags &= ~FOO_READY;
159         splx(s);
160
161         ...
162 }
163
164 void
165 foointr(...)
166 {
167         struct foo_softc *sc;
168
169         ...
170         sc->flags |= FOO_READY;
171         if (sc->flags & FOO_ASLEEP)
172                 /* Somebody was waiting for us, awake him. */
173                 wakeup(sc);
174         ...
175 }
176
177 .Ed
178 Note that the interrupt handler should
179 .Em never
180 reduce the priority level.  It is automatically called as it had
181 raised the interrupt priority to its own level, i.e. further interrupts
182 of the same group are being blocked.
183 .Sh HISTORY
184 The interrupt priority levels appeared in a very early version of
185 Unix.  They have been traditionally known by number instead of by
186 names, and were inclusive up to higher priority levels (i.e., priority
187 5 has been blocking everything up to level 5).  This is no longer the
188 case in
189 .Fx .
190 The traditional name
191 .Ql level
192 for them is still reflected in the letter
193 .Ql l
194 of the respective functions and variables, although they are not
195 really levels anymore, but rather different (partially inclusive)
196 sets of functions to be blocked during some periods of the life of
197 the system.  The historical number scheme can be considered as a
198 simple linearly ordered set of interrupt priority groups.
199 .Sh AUTHORS
200 This man page was written by
201 .An J\(:org Wunsch .