Import OpenSSH-8.0p1's ssh-copy-id and manual page on the vendor branch.
[dragonfly.git] / crypto / openssh / contrib / ssh-copy-id.1
1 .ig \"  -*- nroff -*-
2 Copyright (c) 1999-2013 hands.com Ltd. <http://hands.com/>
3
4 Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
5 modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
6 are met:
7 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
8    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
9 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
10    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
11    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
12
13 THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR
14 IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
15 OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
16 IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
17 INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
18 NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
19 DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
20 THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
21 (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
22 THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
23 ..
24 .Dd $Mdocdate: June 17 2010 $
25 .Dt SSH-COPY-ID 1
26 .Os
27 .Sh NAME
28 .Nm ssh-copy-id
29 .Nd use locally available keys to authorise logins on a remote machine
30 .Sh SYNOPSIS
31 .Nm
32 .Op Fl f
33 .Op Fl n
34 .Op Fl i Op Ar identity_file
35 .Op Fl p Ar port
36 .Op Fl o Ar ssh_option
37 .Op Ar user Ns @ Ns
38 .Ar hostname
39 .Nm
40 .Fl h | Fl ?
41 .br
42 .Sh DESCRIPTION
43 .Nm
44 is a script that uses
45 .Xr ssh 1
46 to log into a remote machine (presumably using a login password,
47 so password authentication should be enabled, unless you've done some
48 clever use of multiple identities).  It assembles a list of one or more
49 fingerprints (as described below) and tries to log in with each key, to
50 see if any of them are already installed (of course, if you are not using
51 .Xr ssh-agent 1
52 this may result in you being repeatedly prompted for pass-phrases).
53 It then assembles a list of those that failed to log in, and using ssh,
54 enables logins with those keys on the remote server.  By default it adds
55 the keys by appending them to the remote user's
56 .Pa ~/.ssh/authorized_keys
57 (creating the file, and directory, if necessary).  It is also capable
58 of detecting if the remote system is a NetScreen, and using its
59 .Ql set ssh pka-dsa key ...
60 command instead.
61 .Pp
62 The options are as follows:
63 .Bl -tag -width Ds
64 .It Fl i Ar identity_file
65 Use only the key(s) contained in
66 .Ar identity_file
67 (rather than looking for identities via
68 .Xr ssh-add 1
69 or in the
70 .Ic default_ID_file ) .
71 If the filename does not end in
72 .Pa .pub
73 this is added.  If the filename is omitted, the 
74 .Ic default_ID_file
75 is used.
76 .Pp
77 Note that this can be used to ensure that the keys copied have the
78 comment one prefers and/or extra options applied, by ensuring that the
79 key file has these set as preferred before the copy is attempted.
80 .It Fl f
81 Forced mode: doesn't check if the keys are present on the remote server.
82 This means that it does not need the private key.  Of course, this can result
83 in more than one copy of the key being installed on the remote system.
84 .It Fl n
85 do a dry-run.  Instead of installing keys on the remote system simply
86 prints the key(s) that would have been installed.
87 .It Fl h , Fl ?
88 Print Usage summary
89 .It Fl p Ar port , Fl o Ar ssh_option
90 These two options are simply passed through untouched, along with their
91 argument, to allow one to set the port or other
92 .Xr ssh 1
93 options, respectively.
94 .Pp
95 Rather than specifying these as command line options, it is often better to use (per-host) settings in
96 .Xr ssh 1 Ns 's
97 configuration file:
98 .Xr ssh_config 5 .
99 .El
100 .Pp
101 Default behaviour without
102 .Fl i ,
103 is to check if
104 .Ql ssh-add -L
105 provides any output, and if so those keys are used.  Note that this results in
106 the comment on the key being the filename that was given to
107 .Xr ssh-add 1
108 when the key was loaded into your
109 .Xr ssh-agent 1
110 rather than the comment contained in that file, which is a bit of a shame.
111 Otherwise, if
112 .Xr ssh-add 1
113 provides no keys contents of the 
114 .Ic default_ID_file
115 will be used.
116 .Pp
117 The
118 .Ic default_ID_file
119 is the most recent file that matches:
120 .Pa ~/.ssh/id*.pub ,
121 (excluding those that match
122 .Pa ~/.ssh/*-cert.pub )
123 so if you create a key that is not the one you want
124 .Nm
125 to use, just use
126 .Xr touch 1
127 on your preferred key's 
128 .Pa .pub
129 file to reinstate it as the most recent.
130 .Pp
131 .Sh EXAMPLES
132 If you have already installed keys from one system on a lot of remote
133 hosts, and you then create a new key, on a new client machine, say,
134 it can be difficult to keep track of which systems on which you've
135 installed the new key.  One way of dealing with this is to load both
136 the new key and old key(s) into your
137 .Xr ssh-agent 1 .
138 Load the new key first, without the
139 .Fl c
140 option, then load one or more old keys into the agent, possibly by
141 ssh-ing to the client machine that has that old key, using the
142 .Fl A
143 option to allow agent forwarding:
144 .Pp
145 .D1 user@newclient$ ssh-add
146 .D1 user@newclient$ ssh -A old.client
147 .D1 user@oldl$ ssh-add -c
148 .D1 No   ... prompt for pass-phrase ...
149 .D1 user@old$ logoff
150 .D1 user@newclient$ ssh someserver
151 .Pp
152 now, if the new key is installed on the server, you'll be allowed in
153 unprompted, whereas if you only have the old key(s) enabled, you'll be
154 asked for confirmation, which is your cue to log back out and run
155 .Pp
156 .D1 user@newclient$ ssh-copy-id -i someserver
157 .Pp
158 The reason you might want to specify the -i option in this case is to
159 ensure that the comment on the installed key is the one from the
160 .Pa .pub
161 file, rather than just the filename that was loaded into you agent.
162 It also ensures that only the id you intended is installed, rather than
163 all the keys that you have in your
164 .Xr ssh-agent 1 .
165 Of course, you can specify another id, or use the contents of the
166 .Xr ssh-agent 1
167 as you prefer.
168 .Pp
169 Having mentioned
170 .Xr ssh-add 1 Ns 's
171 .Fl c
172 option, you might consider using this whenever using agent forwarding
173 to avoid your key being hijacked, but it is much better to instead use
174 .Xr ssh 1 Ns 's
175 .Ar ProxyCommand
176 and 
177 .Fl W
178 option,
179 to bounce through remote servers while always doing direct end-to-end
180 authentication. This way the middle hop(s) don't get access to your
181 .Xr ssh-agent 1 .
182 A web search for
183 .Ql ssh proxycommand nc
184 should prove enlightening (N.B. the modern approach is to use the
185 .Fl W
186 option, rather than
187 .Xr nc 1 ) .
188 .Sh "SEE ALSO"
189 .Xr ssh 1 ,
190 .Xr ssh-agent 1 ,
191 .Xr sshd 8