mouse.h - Change to be not per-architecture.
[dragonfly.git] / share / man / man4 / psm.4
1 .\"
2 .\" Copyright (c) 1997
3 .\" Kazutaka YOKOTA <yokota@zodiac.mech.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp>
4 .\" All rights reserved.
5 .\"
6 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
7 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
8 .\" are met:
9 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
10 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer as
11 .\"    the first lines of this file unmodified.
12 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
13 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
14 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
15 .\"
16 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR
17 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
18 .\" OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
19 .\" IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
20 .\" INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
21 .\" NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
22 .\" DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
23 .\" THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
24 .\" (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
25 .\" THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
26 .\"
27 .\" $FreeBSD: src/share/man/man4/psm.4,v 1.24.2.9 2002/12/29 16:35:38 schweikh Exp $
28 .\" $DragonFly: src/share/man/man4/psm.4,v 1.7 2008/05/02 02:05:05 swildner Exp $
29 .\"
30 .Dd April 1, 2000
31 .Dt PSM 4
32 .Os
33 .Sh NAME
34 .Nm psm
35 .Nd PS/2 mouse style pointing device driver
36 .Sh SYNOPSIS
37 .Cd "options KBD_RESETDELAY=N"
38 .Cd "options KBD_MAXWAIT=N"
39 .Cd "options PSM_DEBUG=N"
40 .Cd "options KBDIO_DEBUG=N"
41 .Cd "device psm0 at atkbdc? irq 12"
42 .Sh DESCRIPTION
43 The
44 .Nm
45 driver provides support for the PS/2 mouse style pointing device.
46 Currently there can be only one
47 .Nm
48 device node in the system.
49 As the PS/2 mouse port is located
50 at the auxiliary port of the keyboard controller,
51 the keyboard controller driver,
52 .Nm atkbdc ,
53 must also be configured in the kernel.
54 Note that there is currently no provision of changing the
55 .Em irq
56 number.
57 .Pp
58 Basic PS/2 style pointing device has two or three buttons.
59 Some devices may have a roller or a wheel and/or additional buttons.
60 .Ss Device Resolution
61 The PS/2 style pointing device usually has several grades of resolution,
62 that is, sensitivity of movement.
63 They are typically 25, 50, 100 and 200
64 pulse per inch.
65 Some devices may have finer resolution.
66 The current resolution can be changed at runtime.
67 The
68 .Nm
69 driver allows the user to initially set the resolution
70 via the driver flag
71 (see
72 .Sx "DRIVER CONFIGURATION" )
73 or change it later via the
74 .Xr ioctl 2
75 command
76 .Dv MOUSE_SETMODE
77 (see
78 .Sx IOCTLS ) .
79 .Ss Report Rate
80 Frequency, or report rate, at which the device sends movement
81 and button state reports to the host system is also configurable.
82 The PS/2 style pointing device typically supports 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100
83 and 200 reports per second.
84 60 or 100 appears to be the default value for many devices.
85 Note that when there is no movement and no button has changed its state,
86 the device won't send anything to the host system.
87 The report rate can be changed via an ioctl call.
88 .Ss Operation Levels
89 The
90 .Nm
91 driver has three levels of operation.
92 The current operation level can be set via an ioctl call.
93 .Pp
94 At the level zero the basic support is provided; the device driver will report
95 horizontal and vertical movement of the attached device
96 and state of up to three buttons.
97 The movement and status are encoded in a series of fixed-length data packets
98 (see
99 .Sx "Data Packet Format" ) .
100 This is the default level of operation and the driver is initially
101 at this level when opened by the user program.
102 .Pp
103 The operation level one, the `extended' level, supports a roller (or wheel),
104 if any, and up to 11 buttons.
105 The movement of the roller is reported as movement along the Z axis.
106 8 byte data packets are sent to the user program at this level.
107 .Pp
108 At the operation level two, data from the pointing device is passed to the
109 user program as is.
110 Modern PS/2 type pointing devices often use proprietary data format.
111 Therefore, the user program is expected to have
112 intimate knowledge about the format from a particular device when operating
113 the driver at this level.
114 This level is called `native' level.
115 .Ss Data Packet Format
116 Data packets read from the
117 .Nm
118 driver are formatted differently at each operation level.
119 .Pp
120 A data packet from the PS/2 mouse style pointing device
121 is three bytes long at the operation level zero:
122 .Pp
123 .Bl -tag -width Byte_1 -compact
124 .It Byte 1
125 .Bl -tag -width bit_7 -compact
126 .It bit 7
127 One indicates overflow in the vertical movement count.
128 .It bit 6
129 One indicates overflow in the horizontal movement count.
130 .It bit 5
131 Set if the vertical movement count is negative.
132 .It bit 4
133 Set if the horizontal movement count is negative.
134 .It bit 3
135 Always one.
136 .\" The ALPS GlidePoint clears this bit when the user `taps' the surface of
137 .\" the pad, otherwise the bit is set.
138 .\" Most, if not all, other devices always set this bit.
139 .It bit 2
140 Middle button status; set if pressed.
141 For devices without the middle
142 button, this bit is always zero.
143 .It bit 1
144 Right button status; set if pressed.
145 .It bit 0
146 Left button status; set if pressed.
147 .El
148 .It Byte 2
149 Horizontal movement count in two's complement;
150 -256 through 255.
151 Note that the sign bit is in the first byte.
152 .It Byte 3
153 Vertical movement count in two's complement;
154 -256 through 255.
155 Note that the sign bit is in the first byte.
156 .El
157 .Pp
158 At the level one, a data packet is encoded
159 in the standard format
160 .Dv MOUSE_PROTO_SYSMOUSE
161 as defined in
162 .Xr mouse 4 .
163 .Pp
164 At the level two, native level, there is no standard on the size and format
165 of the data packet.
166 .Ss Acceleration
167 The
168 .Nm
169 driver can somewhat `accelerate' the movement of the pointing device.
170 The faster you move the device, the further the pointer
171 travels on the screen.
172 The driver has an internal variable which governs the effect of
173 the acceleration.
174 Its value can be modified via the driver flag
175 or via an ioctl call.
176 .Ss Device Number
177 The minor device number of the
178 .Nm
179 is made up of:
180 .Bd -literal -offset indent
181 minor = (`unit' << 1) | `non-blocking'
182 .Ed
183 .Pp
184 where `unit' is the device number (usually 0) and the `non-blocking' bit
185 is set to indicate ``don't block waiting for mouse input,
186 return immediately''.
187 The `non-blocking' bit should be set for \fIXFree86\fP,
188 therefore the minor device number usually used for \fIXFree86\fP is 1.
189 See
190 .Sx FILES
191 for device node names.
192 .Sh DRIVER CONFIGURATION
193 .Ss Kernel Configuration Options
194 There are following kernel configuration options to control the
195 .Nm
196 driver.
197 They may be set in the kernel configuration file
198 (see
199 .Xr config 8 ) .
200 .Bl -tag -width MOUSE
201 .It Em KBD_RESETDELAY=X , KBD_MAXWAIT=Y
202 The
203 .Nm
204 driver will attempt to reset the pointing device during the boot process.
205 It sometimes takes a long while before the device will respond after
206 reset.
207 These options control how long the driver should wait before
208 it eventually gives up waiting.
209 The driver will wait
210 .Fa X
211 *
212 .Fa Y
213 msecs at most.
214 If the driver seems unable to detect your pointing
215 device, you may want to increase these values.
216 The default values are
217 200 msec for
218 .Fa X
219 and 5
220 for
221 .Fa Y .
222 .It Em PSM_DEBUG=N , KBDIO_DEBUG=N
223 Sets the debug level to
224 .Fa N .
225 The default debug level is zero.
226 See
227 .Sx DIAGNOSTICS
228 for debug logging.
229 .El
230 .Ss Driver Flags
231 The
232 .Nm
233 driver accepts the following driver flags.
234 Set them in the
235 kernel configuration file or in the User Configuration Menu at
236 the boot time
237 (see
238 .Xr boot 8 ) .
239 .Bl -tag -width MOUSE
240 .It bit 0..3 RESOLUTION
241 This flag specifies the resolution of the pointing device.
242 It must be zero through four.
243 The greater the value
244 is, the finer resolution the device will select.
245 Actual resolution selected by this field varies according to the model
246 of the device.
247 Typical resolutions are:
248 .Pp
249 .Bl -tag -width 0_(medium_high)__ -compact
250 .It Em 1 (low)
251 25 pulse per inch (ppi)
252 .It Em 2 (medium low)
253 50 ppi
254 .It Em 3 (medium high)
255 100 ppi
256 .It Em 4 (high)
257 200 ppi
258 .El
259 .Pp
260 Leaving this flag zero will selects the default resolution for the
261 device (whatever it is).
262 .It bit 4..7 ACCELERATION
263 This flag controls the amount of acceleration effect.
264 The smaller the value of this flag is, more sensitive the movement becomes.
265 The minimum value allowed, thus the value for the most sensitive setting,
266 is one.
267 Setting this flag to zero will completely disables the
268 acceleration effect.
269 .It bit 8 NOCHECKSYNC
270 The
271 .Nm
272 driver tries to detect the first byte of the data packet by checking
273 the bit pattern of that byte.
274 Although this method should work with most
275 PS/2 pointing devices, it may interfere with some devices which are not
276 so compatible with known devices.
277 If you think your pointing device is not functioning as expected,
278 and the kernel frequently prints the following message to the console,
279 .Bd -literal -offset indent
280 psmintr: out of sync (xxxx != yyyy).
281 .Ed
282 .Pp
283 set this flag to disable synchronization check and see if it helps.
284 .It bit 9 NOIDPROBE
285 The
286 .Nm
287 driver will not try to identify the model of the pointing device and
288 will not carry out model-specific initialization.
289 The device should always act like a standard PS/2 mouse without such
290 initialization.
291 Extra features, such as wheels and additional buttons, won't be
292 recognized by the
293 .Nm
294 driver.
295 .It bit 10 NORESET
296 When this flag is set, the
297 .Nm
298 driver won't reset the pointing device when initializing the device.
299 If the
300 .Dx
301 kernel
302 is started after another OS has run, the pointing device will inherit
303 settings from the previous OS.
304 However, because there is no way for the
305 .Nm
306 driver to know the settings, the device and the driver may not
307 work correctly.
308 The flag should never be necessary under normal circumstances.
309 .It bit 11 FORCETAP
310 Some pad devices report as if the fourth button is pressed
311 when the user `taps' the surface of the device (see
312 .Sx CAVEATS ) .
313 This flag will make the
314 .Nm
315 driver assume that the device behaves this way.
316 Without the flag, the driver will assume this behavior
317 for ALPS GlidePoint models only.
318 .It bit 12 IGNOREPORTERROR
319 This flag makes
320 .Nm
321 driver ignore certain error conditions when probing the PS/2 mouse port.
322 It should never be necessary under normal circumstances.
323 .It bit 13 HOOKRESUME
324 The built-in PS/2 pointing device of some laptop computers is somehow
325 not operable immediately after the system `resumes' from
326 the power saving mode,
327 though it will eventually become available.
328 There are reports that
329 stimulating the device by performing I/O will help
330 waking up the device quickly.
331 This flag will enable a piece of code in the
332 .Nm
333 driver to hook
334 the `resume' event and exercise some harmless I/O operations on the
335 device.
336 .It bit 14 INITAFTERSUSPEND
337 This flag adds more drastic action for the above problem.
338 It will cause the
339 .Nm
340 driver to reset and re-initialize the pointing device
341 after the `resume' event.
342 It has no effect unless the
343 .Em HOOKRESUME
344 flag is set as well.
345 .El
346 .Sh IOCTLS
347 There are a few
348 .Xr ioctl 2
349 commands for mouse drivers.
350 These commands and related structures and constants are defined in
351 .In sys/mouse.h .
352 General description of the commands is given in
353 .Xr mouse 4 .
354 This section explains the features specific to the
355 .Nm
356 driver.
357 .Pp
358 .Bl -tag -width MOUSE -compact
359 .It Dv MOUSE_GETLEVEL Ar int *level
360 .It Dv MOUSE_SETLEVEL Ar int *level
361 These commands manipulate the operation level of the
362 .Nm
363 driver.
364 .Pp
365 .It Dv MOUSE_GETHWINFO Ar mousehw_t *hw
366 Returns the hardware information of the attached device in the following
367 structure.
368 .Bd -literal
369 typedef struct mousehw {
370     int buttons;    /* number of buttons */
371     int iftype;     /* I/F type */
372     int type;       /* mouse/track ball/pad... */
373     int model;      /* I/F dependent model ID */
374     int hwid;       /* I/F dependent hardware ID */
375 } mousehw_t;
376 .Ed
377 .Pp
378 The
379 .Dv buttons
380 field holds the number of buttons on the device.
381 The
382 .Nm
383 driver currently can detect the 3 button mouse from Logitech and report
384 accordingly.
385 The 3 button mouse from the other manufacturer may or may not be
386 reported correctly.
387 However, it will not affect the operation of
388 the driver.
389 .Pp
390 The
391 .Dv iftype
392 is always
393 .Dv MOUSE_IF_PS2 .
394 .Pp
395 The
396 .Dv type
397 tells the device type:
398 .Dv MOUSE_MOUSE ,
399 .Dv MOUSE_TRACKBALL ,
400 .Dv MOUSE_STICK ,
401 .Dv MOUSE_PAD ,
402 or
403 .Dv MOUSE_UNKNOWN .
404 The user should not heavily rely on this field, as the
405 driver may not always, in fact it is very rarely able to, identify
406 the device type.
407 .Pp
408 The
409 .Dv model
410 is always
411 .Dv MOUSE_MODEL_GENERIC
412 at the operation level 0.
413 It may be
414 .Dv MOUSE_MODEL_GENERIC
415 or one of
416 .Dv MOUSE_MODEL_XXX
417 constants at higher operation levels.
418 Again the
419 .Nm
420 driver may or may not set an appropriate value in this field.
421 .Pp
422 The
423 .Dv hwid
424 is the ID value returned by the device.
425 Known IDs include:
426 .Pp
427 .Bl -tag -width 0__ -compact
428 .It Em 0
429 Mouse (Microsoft, Logitech and many other manufacturers)
430 .It Em 2
431 Microsoft Ballpoint mouse
432 .It Em 3
433 Microsoft IntelliMouse
434 .El
435 .Pp
436 .It Dv MOUSE_GETMODE Ar mousemode_t *mode
437 The command gets the current operation parameters of the mouse
438 driver.
439 .Bd -literal
440 typedef struct mousemode {
441     int protocol;    /* MOUSE_PROTO_XXX */
442     int rate;        /* report rate (per sec), -1 if unknown */
443     int resolution;  /* MOUSE_RES_XXX, -1 if unknown */
444     int accelfactor; /* acceleration factor */
445     int level;       /* driver operation level */
446     int packetsize;  /* the length of the data packet */
447     unsigned char syncmask[2]; /* sync. bits */
448 } mousemode_t;
449 .Ed
450 .Pp
451 The
452 .Dv protocol
453 is
454 .Dv MOUSE_PROTO_PS2
455 at the operation level zero and two.
456 .Dv MOUSE_PROTO_SYSMOUSE
457 at the operation level one.
458 .Pp
459 The
460 .Dv rate
461 is the status report rate (reports/sec) at which the device will send
462 movement report to the host computer.
463 Typical supported values are 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 200.
464 Some mice may accept other arbitrary values too.
465 .Pp
466 The
467 .Dv resolution
468 of the pointing device must be one of
469 .Dv MOUSE_RES_XXX
470 constants or a positive value.
471 The greater the value
472 is, the finer resolution the mouse will select.
473 Actual resolution selected by the
474 .Dv MOUSE_RES_XXX
475 constant varies according to the model of mouse.
476 Typical resolutions are:
477 .Pp
478 .Bl -tag -width MOUSE_RES_MEDIUMHIGH__ -compact
479 .It Dv MOUSE_RES_LOW
480 25 ppi
481 .It Dv MOUSE_RES_MEDIUMLOW
482 50 ppi
483 .It Dv MOUSE_RES_MEDIUMHIGH
484 100 ppi
485 .It Dv MOUSE_RES_HIGH
486 200 ppi
487 .El
488 .Pp
489 The
490 .Dv accelfactor
491 field holds a value to control acceleration feature
492 (see
493 .Sx Acceleration ) .
494 It must be zero or greater.  If it is zero, acceleration is disabled.
495 .Pp
496 The
497 .Dv packetsize
498 field specifies the length of the data packet.
499 It depends on the
500 operation level and the model of the pointing device.
501 .Pp
502 .Bl -tag -width level_0__ -compact
503 .It Em level 0
504 3 bytes
505 .It Em level 1
506 8 bytes
507 .It Em level 2
508 Depends on the model of the device
509 .El
510 .Pp
511 The array
512 .Dv syncmask
513 holds a bit mask and pattern to detect the first byte of the
514 data packet.
515 .Dv syncmask[0]
516 is the bit mask to be ANDed with a byte.
517 If the result is equal to
518 .Dv syncmask[1] ,
519 the byte is likely to be the first byte of the data packet.
520 Note that this detection method is not 100% reliable,
521 thus, should be taken only as an advisory measure.
522 .Pp
523 .It Dv MOUSE_SETMODE Ar mousemode_t *mode
524 The command changes the current operation parameters of the mouse driver
525 as specified in
526 .Ar mode .
527 Only
528 .Dv rate ,
529 .Dv resolution ,
530 .Dv level
531 and
532 .Dv accelfactor
533 may be modifiable.
534 Setting values in the other field does not generate
535 error and has no effect.
536 .Pp
537 If you do not want to change the current setting of a field, put -1
538 there.
539 You may also put zero in
540 .Dv resolution
541 and
542 .Dv rate ,
543 and the default value for the fields will be selected.
544 .\" .Pp
545 .\" .It Dv MOUSE_GETVARS Ar mousevar_t *vars
546 .\" .It Dv MOUSE_SETVARS Ar mousevar_t *vars
547 .\" These commands are not supported by the
548 .\" .Nm
549 .\" driver.
550 .Pp
551 .It Dv MOUSE_READDATA Ar mousedata_t *data
552 .\" The command reads the raw data from the device.
553 .\" .Bd -literal
554 .\" typedef struct mousedata {
555 .\"     int len;        /* # of data in the buffer */
556 .\"     int buf[16];    /* data buffer */
557 .\" } mousedata_t;
558 .\" .Ed
559 .\" .Pp
560 .\" Upon returning to the user program, the driver will place the number
561 .\" of valid data bytes in the buffer in the
562 .\" .Dv len
563 .\" field.
564 .\" .Pp
565 .It Dv MOUSE_READSTATE Ar mousedata_t *state
566 .\" The command reads the hardware settings from the device.
567 .\" Upon returning to the user program, the driver will place the number
568 .\" of valid data bytes in the buffer in the
569 .\" .Dv len
570 .\" field. It is usually 3 bytes.
571 .\" The buffer is formatted as follows:
572 .\" .Pp
573 .\" .Bl -tag -width Byte_1 -compact
574 .\" .It Byte 1
575 .\" .Bl -tag -width bit_6 -compact
576 .\" .It bit 7
577 .\" Reserved.
578 .\" .It bit 6
579 .\" 0 - stream mode, 1 - remote mode.
580 .\" In the stream mode, the pointing device sends the device status
581 .\" whenever its state changes. In the remote mode, the host computer
582 .\" must request the status to be sent.
583 .\" The
584 .\" .Nm
585 .\" driver puts the device in the stream mode.
586 .\" .It bit 5
587 .\" Set if the pointing device is currently enabled. Otherwise zero.
588 .\" .It bit 4
589 .\" 0 - 1:1 scaling, 1 - 2:1 scaling.
590 .\" 1:1 scaling is the default.
591 .\" .It bit 3
592 .\" Reserved.
593 .\" .It bit 2
594 .\" Left button status; set if pressed.
595 .\" .It bit 1
596 .\" Middle button status; set if pressed.
597 .\" .It bit 0
598 .\" Right button status; set if pressed.
599 .\" .El
600 .\" .It Byte 2
601 .\" .Bl -tag -width bit_6_0 -compact
602 .\" .It bit 7
603 .\" Reserved.
604 .\" .It bit 6..0
605 .\" Resolution code: zero through three. Actual resolution for
606 .\" the resolution code varies from one device to another.
607 .\" .El
608 .\" .It Byte 3
609 .\" The status report rate (reports/sec) at which the device will send
610 .\" movement report to the host computer.
611 .\" .El
612 These commands are not currently supported by the
613 .Nm
614 driver.
615 .Pp
616 .It Dv MOUSE_GETSTATUS Ar mousestatus_t *status
617 The command returns the current state of buttons and
618 movement counts as described in
619 .Xr mouse 4 .
620 .El
621 .Sh FILES
622 .Bl -tag -width /dev/npsm0 -compact
623 .It Pa /dev/psm0
624 `non-blocking' device node
625 .It Pa /dev/bpsm0
626 `blocking' device node
627 .El
628 .Sh EXAMPLES
629 .Dl "device psm0 at atkbdc? irq 12 flags 0x2000"
630 .Pp
631 Add the
632 .Nm
633 driver to the kernel with the optional code to stimulate the pointing device
634 after the `resume' event.
635 .Pp
636 .Dl "device psm0 at atkbdc? flags 0x024 irq 12"
637 .Pp
638 Set the device resolution high (4) and the acceleration factor to 2.
639 .Sh DIAGNOSTICS
640 At debug level 0, little information is logged except for the following
641 line during boot process:
642 .Bd -literal -offset indent
643 psm0: device ID X
644 .Ed
645 .Pp
646 where
647 .Fa X
648 the device ID code returned by the found pointing device.
649 See
650 .Dv MOUSE_GETINFO
651 for known IDs.
652 .Pp
653 At debug level 1 more information will be logged
654 while the driver probes the auxiliary port (mouse port).
655 Messages are logged with the LOG_KERN facility at the LOG_DEBUG level
656 (see
657 .Xr syslogd 8 ) .
658 .Bd -literal -offset indent
659 psm0: current command byte:xxxx
660 kbdio: TEST_AUX_PORT status:0000
661 kbdio: RESET_AUX return code:00fa
662 kbdio: RESET_AUX status:00aa
663 kbdio: RESET_AUX ID:0000
664 [...]
665 psm: status 00 02 64
666 psm0 irq 12 on isa
667 psm0: model AAAA, device ID X, N buttons
668 psm0: config:00000www, flags:0000uuuu, packet size:M
669 psm0: syncmask:xx, syncbits:yy
670 .Ed
671 .Pp
672 The first line shows the command byte value of the keyboard
673 controller just before the auxiliary port is probed.
674 It usually is 4D, 45, 47 or 65, depending on how the motherboard BIOS
675 initialized the keyboard controller upon power-up.
676 .Pp
677 The second line shows the result of the keyboard controller's
678 test on the auxiliary port interface, with zero indicating
679 no error; note that some controllers report no error even if
680 the port does not exist in the system, however.
681 .Pp
682 The third through fifth lines show the reset status of the pointing device.
683 The functioning device should return the sequence of FA AA <ID>.
684 The ID code is described above.
685 .Pp
686 The seventh line shows the current hardware settings.
687 .\" See
688 .\" .Dv MOUSE_READSTATE
689 .\" for definitions.
690 These bytes are formatted as follows:
691 .Pp
692 .Bl -tag -width Byte_1 -compact
693 .It Byte 1
694 .Bl -tag -width bit_6 -compact
695 .It bit 7
696 Reserved.
697 .It bit 6
698 0 - stream mode, 1 - remote mode.
699 In the stream mode, the pointing device sends the device status
700 whenever its state changes.
701 In the remote mode, the host computer
702 must request the status to be sent.
703 The
704 .Nm
705 driver puts the device in the stream mode.
706 .It bit 5
707 Set if the pointing device is currently enabled.
708 Otherwise zero.
709 .It bit 4
710 0 - 1:1 scaling, 1 - 2:1 scaling.
711 1:1 scaling is the default.
712 .It bit 3
713 Reserved.
714 .It bit 2
715 Left button status; set if pressed.
716 .It bit 1
717 Middle button status; set if pressed.
718 .It bit 0
719 Right button status; set if pressed.
720 .El
721 .It Byte 2
722 .Bl -tag -width bit_6_0 -compact
723 .It bit 7
724 Reserved.
725 .It bit 6..0
726 Resolution code: zero through three.
727 Actual resolution for
728 the resolution code varies from one device to another.
729 .El
730 .It Byte 3
731 The status report rate (reports/sec) at which the device will send
732 movement report to the host computer.
733 .El
734 .Pp
735 Note that the pointing device will not be enabled until the
736 .Nm
737 driver is opened by the user program.
738 .Pp
739 The rest of the lines show the device ID code, the number of detected
740 buttons and internal variables.
741 .Pp
742 At debug level 2, much more detailed information is logged.
743 .Sh CAVEATS
744 Many pad devices behave as if the first (left) button were pressed if
745 the user `taps' the surface of the pad.
746 In contrast, some pad products, e.g. some versions of ALPS GlidePoint
747 and Interlink VersaPad, treat the tapping action
748 as fourth button events.
749 .Pp
750 It is reported that Interlink VersaPad requires both
751 .Em HOOKRESUME
752 and
753 .Em INITAFTERSUSPEND
754 flags in order to recover from suspended state.
755 These flags are automatically set when VersaPad is detected by the
756 .Nm
757 driver.
758 .Pp
759 Some PS/2 mouse models from MouseSystems require to be put in the
760 high resolution mode to work properly.
761 Use the driver flag to
762 set resolution.
763 .Pp
764 There is not a guaranteed way to re-synchronize with the first byte
765 of the packet once we are out of synchronization with the data
766 stream.
767 However, if you are using the \fIXFree86\fP server and experiencing
768 the problem, you may be able to make the X server synchronize with the mouse
769 by switching away to a virtual terminal and getting back to the X server,
770 unless the X server is accessing the mouse via
771 .Xr moused 8 .
772 Clicking any button without moving the mouse may also work.
773 .Sh SEE ALSO
774 .Xr ioctl 2 ,
775 .Xr syslog 3 ,
776 .Xr atkbdc 4 ,
777 .Xr mouse 4 ,
778 .Xr mse 4 ,
779 .Xr sysmouse 4 ,
780 .Xr moused 8 ,
781 .Xr syslogd 8
782 .\".Sh HISTORY
783 .Sh AUTHORS
784 .An -nosplit
785 The
786 .Nm
787 driver is based on the work done by quite a number of people, including
788 .An Eric Forsberg ,
789 .An Sandi Donno ,
790 .An Rick Macklem ,
791 .An Andrew Herbert ,
792 .An Charles Hannum ,
793 .An Shoji Yuen
794 and
795 .An Kazutaka Yokota
796 to name the few.
797 .Pp
798 This manual page was written by
799 .An Kazutaka Yokota Aq yokota@FreeBSD.org .
800 .Sh BUGS
801 The ioctl command
802 .Dv MOUSEIOCREAD
803 has been removed.
804 It was never functional anyway.