ifconfig(8): Use correct interface name when setting flags
[dragonfly.git] / share / examples / diskless / README.BOOTP
1 # $FreeBSD: src/share/examples/diskless/README.BOOTP,v 1.2.4.1 2002/02/12 17:43:11 luigi Exp $
2 # Notes on diskless boot.
3
4 IMPORTANT NOTE:
5
6 For quite some time
7 the /etc/rc.d/{initdiskless,diskless} scripts support a slightly different
8 diskless boot process than the one documented in the rest of this file.
9
10 I am not deleting the information below because it contains some
11 useful background information on diskless operation, but for the
12 actual details you should look at diskless(8), /etc/rc.d/initdiskless,
13 /etc/rc.d/diskless,
14 and the /usr/share/examples/diskless/clone_root script which can
15 be useful to set up clients and server for diskless boot.
16
17 -----------------------------------------------------------------------
18
19                         BOOTP configuration mechanism
20
21                             Matthew Dillon
22                             dillon@backplane.com
23
24     BOOTP kernels automatically configure the machine's IP address, netmask,
25     optional NFS based swap, and NFS based root mount.  The NFS server will
26     typically export a shared read-only /, /usr, and /var to any number of
27     workstations.  The shared read-only root is typically either the server's
28     own root or, if you are more security concious, a contrived root.
29
30     The key issue with starting up a BOOTP kernel is that you typically want
31     to export read-only NFS partitions from the server, yet still be able to
32     customize each workstation ( or not ).
33
34     /etc/rc.diskless1 is responsible for doing core mounts and for retargeting
35     /conf/ME ( part of the read-only root NFS mount ) to /conf/$IP_OF_CLIENT.
36     /etc/rc.conf.local and /etc/rc.local, along with other machine-specific
37     configuration files, are typically softlinks to /conf/ME/<filename>.
38
39     In the BOOTP workstation /conf/$IP/rc.conf.local, you must typically
40     turn *OFF* most of the system option defaults in /etc/rc.conf as well
41     as do additional custom configuration of your environment
42
43     The /usr/src/share/examples/diskless directory contains a typical
44     X session / sshd based workstation configuration.  The directories
45     involved are HT.DISKLESS/ and 192.157.86.12/. 
46
47     Essentially, the $IP/ directory ( which rc.diskless looks for in
48     /conf/$IP/ ) contains all the junk.  The HT.DISKLESS directory exists
49     to hold common elements of your custom configuration so you do not have
50     to repeat those elements for each workstation.  The example /conf 
51     structure included here shows how to create a working sshd setup ( so
52     you can sshd into the diskless workstation ), retarget xdm's pid and error
53     files to R+W directories if /usr is mounted read-only, and retarget
54     syslogd and other programs.  This example is not designed to run out of
55     the box and some modifications are required.
56
57     >> NOTE <<  HT.DISKLESS/ttys contains the typical configuration required
58     to bring X up at boot time.  Essentially, it runs xdm in the foreground
59     with the appropriate arguments rather then a getty on ttyv0.  You must
60     run xdm on ttyv0 in order to prevent xdm racing with getty on a virtual
61     terminal.  Such a race can cause your keyboard to be directed away from
62     the X session, essentially making the session unusable.
63
64     Typically you should start with a clean slate by tar-copying this example
65     directory to /conf and then hack on it in /conf rather then in 
66     /usr/share/examples/diskless.
67
68                                 BOOTP CLIENT SETUP
69
70     Here is a typical kernel configuration.  If you have only one ethernet
71     interface you do not need to wire BOOTP to a specific interface name.
72     BOOTP requires NFS and NFS_ROOT, and our boot scripts require MFS.  If
73     your /tmp is *not* a softlink to /var/tmp, the scripts also require NULLFS
74
75 # BootP
76 #
77 options         BOOTP           # Use BOOTP to obtain IP address/hostname
78 options         BOOTP_NFSROOT   # NFS mount root filesystem using BOOTP info
79 options         BOOTP_COMPAT    # Workaround for broken bootp daemons.
80 #options         "BOOTP_WIRED_TO=de0"
81
82 options         MFS                     # Memory File System
83 options         NFS                     # Network Filesystem
84 options         NFS_ROOT                # Nfs can be root
85 options         NULLFS                  # nullfs to map /var/tmp to /tmp
86
87                                 BOOTP SERVER SETUP
88
89     The BOOTP server must be running on the same logical LAN as the
90     BOOTP client(s).  You need to setup two things:
91
92     (1) You need to NFS-export /, /usr, and /var.
93
94     (2) You need to run a BOOTP server.  DHCPD can do this.
95
96
97     NFS Export:
98
99         Here is an example "/etc/exports" file.
100
101 / -ro -maproot=root: -network 192.157.86.0 -mask 255.255.255.192
102 /usr -ro -maproot=root: -network 192.157.86.0 -mask 255.255.255.192
103 /var -ro -maproot=root: -network 192.157.86.0 -mask 255.255.255.192
104
105     In order to be an NFS server, the server must run portmap, mountd,
106     nfsd, and rpc.statd.  The standard NFS server options in /etc/rc.conf
107     will work ( you should put your overrides in /etc/rc.conf.local on the
108     server and not edit the distribution /etc/rc.conf, though ).
109
110     BOOTP Server:
111
112         This configuration file "/etc/dhcpd.conf" example is for 
113         the '/usr/ports/net/isc-dhcp' dhcpd port.
114
115             subnet 192.157.86.0 netmask 255.255.255.192 {
116                 # range if you want to run the core dhcpd service of
117                 # dynamic IP assignment, but it is not used with BOOTP 
118                 # workstations
119                 range 192.157.86.32 192.157.86.62;
120
121                 # misc configuration.
122                 #
123                 option routers 192.157.86.2;
124                 option domain-name-servers 192.157.86.2;
125
126                 server-name "apollo.fubar.com";
127                 option subnet-mask 255.255.255.192;
128                 option domain-name-servers 192.157.86.2;
129                 option domain-name "fubar.com";
130                 option broadcast-address 192.157.86.63;
131                 option routers 192.157.86.2;
132             }
133
134             host test1 {
135                 hardware ethernet 00:a0:c9:d3:38:25;
136                 fixed-address 192.157.86.11;
137                 option root-path "192.157.86.2:/";
138                 option option-128 "192.157.86.2:/images/swap";
139             }
140
141             host test2 {
142             #    hardware ethernet 00:e0:29:1d:16:09;
143                 hardware ethernet 00:10:5a:a8:94:0e;
144                 fixed-address 192.157.86.12;
145                 option root-path "192.157.86.2:/";
146                 option option-128 "192.157.86.2:/images/swap";
147             }
148
149     SWAP.  This example includes options to automatically BOOTP configure
150     NFS swap on each workstation.  In order to use this capabilities you
151     need to NFS-export a swap directory READ+WRITE to the workstations.
152
153     You must then create a swap directory for each workstation you wish to
154     assign swap to.  In this example I created a dummy user 'lander' and
155     did an NFS export of /images/swap enforcing a UID of 'lander' for
156     all accesses.
157
158         apollo:/usr/ports/net# ls -la /images/swap
159         total 491786
160         drwxr-xr-x  2 root    wheel        512 Dec 28 07:00 .
161         drwxr-xr-x  8 root    wheel        512 Jan 20 10:54 ..
162         -rw-r--r--  1 lander  wheel   33554432 Dec 23 14:35 swap.192.157.86.11
163         -rw-r--r--  1 lander  wheel  335544320 Jan 24 16:55 swap.192.157.86.12
164         -rw-r--r--  1 lander  wheel  134217728 Jan 21 17:19 swap.192.157.86.6
165
166     A swap file is best created with dd:
167
168         # create a 32MB swap file for a BOOTP workstation
169         dd if=/dev/zero of=swap.IPADDRESS bs=1m count=32
170
171     It is generally a good idea to give your workstations some swap space,
172     but not a requirement if they have a lot of memory.
173