Use rtld's TLS interface to allocate tcb.
[dragonfly.git] / share / doc / smm / 05.fastfs / 1.t
1 .\" Copyright (c) 1986, 1993
2 .\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
3 .\"
4 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
5 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
6 .\" are met:
7 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
8 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
9 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
10 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
11 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
12 .\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
13 .\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
14 .\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
15 .\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
16 .\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
17 .\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
18 .\"    without specific prior written permission.
19 .\"
20 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
21 .\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
22 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
23 .\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
24 .\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
25 .\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
26 .\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
27 .\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
28 .\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
29 .\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
30 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
31 .\"
32 .\"     @(#)1.t 8.1 (Berkeley) 6/8/93
33 .\"
34 .ds RH Introduction
35 .NH
36 Introduction
37 .PP
38 This paper describes the changes from the original 512 byte UNIX file
39 system to the new one released with the 4.2 Berkeley Software Distribution.
40 It presents the motivations for the changes,
41 the methods used to effect these changes,
42 the rationale behind the design decisions,
43 and a description of the new implementation.
44 This discussion is followed by a summary of
45 the results that have been obtained,
46 directions for future work,
47 and the additions and changes
48 that have been made to the facilities that are
49 available to programmers.
50 .PP
51 The original UNIX system that runs on the PDP-11\(dg
52 .FS
53 \(dg DEC, PDP, VAX, MASSBUS, and UNIBUS are
54 trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.
55 .FE
56 has simple and elegant file system facilities.  File system input/output
57 is buffered by the kernel;
58 there are no alignment constraints on
59 data transfers and all operations are made to appear synchronous.
60 All transfers to the disk are in 512 byte blocks, which can be placed
61 arbitrarily within the data area of the file system.  Virtually
62 no constraints other than available disk space are placed on file growth
63 [Ritchie74], [Thompson78].*
64 .FS
65 * In practice, a file's size is constrained to be less than about
66 one gigabyte.
67 .FE
68 .PP
69 When used on the VAX-11 together with other UNIX enhancements,
70 the original 512 byte UNIX file
71 system is incapable of providing the data throughput rates
72 that many applications require.
73 For example, 
74 applications
75 such as VLSI design and image processing
76 do a small amount of processing
77 on a large quantities of data and
78 need to have a high throughput from the file system.
79 High throughput rates are also needed by programs
80 that map files from the file system into large virtual
81 address spaces.
82 Paging data in and out of the file system is likely
83 to occur frequently [Ferrin82b].
84 This requires a file system providing
85 higher bandwidth than the original 512 byte UNIX
86 one that provides only about
87 two percent of the maximum disk bandwidth or about
88 20 kilobytes per second per arm [White80], [Smith81b].
89 .PP
90 Modifications have been made to the UNIX file system to improve
91 its performance.
92 Since the UNIX file system interface
93 is well understood and not inherently slow,
94 this development retained the abstraction and simply changed
95 the underlying implementation to increase its throughput.
96 Consequently, users of the system have not been faced with
97 massive software conversion.
98 .PP
99 Problems with file system performance have been dealt with
100 extensively in the literature; see [Smith81a] for a survey.
101 Previous work to improve the UNIX file system performance has been
102 done by [Ferrin82a].
103 The UNIX operating system drew many of its ideas from Multics,
104 a large, high performance operating system [Feiertag71].
105 Other work includes Hydra [Almes78],
106 Spice [Thompson80],
107 and a file system for a LISP environment [Symbolics81].
108 A good introduction to the physical latencies of disks is
109 described in [Pechura83].
110 .ds RH Old file system
111 .sp 2
112 .ne 1i