Make setthetime() static per the prototype.
[dragonfly.git] / contrib / isc-dhcp / ANONCVS
1           Anonymous CVS Access for the ISC DHCP Distribution
2
3 The ISC DHCP distribution can be accessed using "anonymous" CVS.
4 "Anonymous" cvs uses the CVS "pserver" mechanism to allow anybody on
5 the Internet to access a CVS repository without having to register in
6 any way.   Anonymous CVS allows you to access changes as soon as the
7 DHCP developers commit them, rather than having to wait for the next
8 snapshot or patchlevel.   Changes that have not yet been released yet
9 are not guaranteed to work, but they can nonetheless be useful in many
10 cases.
11
12                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
13
14                 1. What is anonymous CVS?
15                 2. How can i start using it?
16                 3. Checking out the latest code in a release
17                 4. Checking out the latest code
18                 5. Checking out a specific release
19                 6. When to update
20
21                         WHAT IS ANONYMOUS CVS?
22
23 Anonymous CVS also allows you to browse through the history of the
24 DHCP distribution, and examine the revision history of specific files
25 to see how they have changed between revisions, to try to figure out
26 why something that was working before is no longer working, or just to
27 see when a certain change was made.
28
29                       HOW CAN I START USING IT?
30
31 To use anonymous CVS to access the DHCP distribution, you must first
32 "log in".   You should only need to do this once, but it is a
33 necessary step, even though access is anonymous.   Anonymous users log
34 in as user "nobody", password "nobody".   To do this, type:
35
36         cvs -d :pserver:nobody@dhcp.cvs.isc.org:/cvsroot login
37
38 You will be prompted for a password - type "nobody".   If you get some
39 kind of error indicating that cvs doesn't know how to log you in, you
40 are probably running an old version of cvs, and should upgrade.   This
41 should work with cvs version 1.10.
42
43 Once you have logged in, you can check out a version of the DHCP
44 distribution, so the next question is, which version?
45
46               CHECKING OUT THE LATEST CODE IN A RELEASE
47
48 There are currently four major versions of the distribution - Release
49 1, Release 2, Release 3, and the current development tree.   Releases
50 1, 2 and 3 are branches in the CVS repository.   To check out the
51 latest code on any of these branches, you would use a branch tag of
52 RELEASE_1, RELEASE_2 or RELEASE_3 in the following command:
53
54         (setenv CVSROOT :pserver:nobody@dhcp.cvs.isc.org:/cvsroot;
55          cvs checkout -d dhcp-2.0 -r RELEASE_2 DHCP)
56
57 Note that the example is for Release 2.
58
59                      CHECKING OUT THE LATEST CODE
60
61 To check out the current engineering version, use:
62
63         (setenv CVSROOT :pserver:nobody@dhcp.cvs.isc.org:/cvsroot;
64          cvs checkout -d dhcp-current DHCP)
65
66 Note that the current engineering version is a work in progress, and
67 there is no real guarantee that it will work for you.
68
69                    CHECKING OUT A SPECIFIC RELEASE
70
71 You can also check out specific versions of the DHCP distribution.
72 There are three kinds of version tags you may find - alpha tags, beta
73 tags and release tags.   Alpha tags look like this:
74
75         V#-ALPHA-YYYYMMDD
76
77 # is the release number.   YYYYMMDD is the date of the release, with a
78 4-digit year, the month expressed as a number (January=1), and the day
79 of the month specified as a number, with the first day of the month
80 being 1.
81
82 Beta tags look like this:
83
84         V#-BETA-%-PATCH-*
85
86 Where # is the release number, % is the Beta number (usually 1) and *
87 is the patchlevel.   In the future there may also be beta tags that
88 look like this:
89
90         V#-#-BETA-%-PATCH-*
91
92 Where #-# is the major version followed by the minor version - for
93 example, when the first 3.1 beta comes out, the tag will look like
94 this:
95
96         V3-1-BETA-1-PATCH-0
97
98 Release tags look like this:
99
100         V#-%-*
101
102 Where # is the major version, % is the minor version, and * is the
103 patchlevel.   So the tag for 1.0pl2 is V1-0-2, and to check it out,
104 you'd type:
105
106         (setenv CVSROOT :pserver:nobody@dhcp.cvs.isc.org:/cvsroot;
107          cvs checkout -d dhcp-1.0pl2 -rV1-0-2 DHCP)
108
109 Whenever changes are checked in to the ISC DHCP repository, or files
110 are tagged, a notice is sent to the dhcp-source-changes@isc.org
111 mailing list.   You can subscribe to this list by sending mail to
112 dhcp-source-changes-request@isc.org, and you will then get immediate
113 notification when changes are made.   You may find the volume of mail
114 on this list annoying, however.
115
116                             WHEN TO UPDATE
117
118 We do not recommend that you do an update immediately after you see a
119 change on the dhcp-source-changes mailing list - instead, it's best to
120 wait a while to make sure that any changes that change depends on have
121 also been committed.   Also, sometimes when development is being done
122 on two machines, the developers will check in a tentative change that
123 hasn't been tested at all so that they can update on a different
124 machine and test the change.   The best way to avoid accidentally
125 getting one of these changes is to not update aggressively - when a
126 change is made, wait a while before updating, to make sure that it's
127 not going to be quickly followed by another change.
128
129 $DragonFly: src/contrib/isc-dhcp/Attic/ANONCVS,v 1.1 2003/10/11 21:14:10 dillon Exp $
130