Sync em(4) manpage with the one in Intel em 6.2.9
[dragonfly.git] / share / man / man8 / crash.8
1 .\" FreeBSD version Copyright (c) 1996
2 .\"     Mike Pritchard <mpp@FreeBSD.org>.  All rights reserved.
3 .\"
4 .\" Adapted from share/man/man8/man8.hp300/crash.8
5 .\"
6 .\" Copyright (c) 1990, 1991, 1993
7 .\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
8 .\"
9 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
10 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
11 .\" are met:
12 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
13 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
14 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
15 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
16 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
17 .\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
18 .\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
19 .\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
20 .\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
21 .\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
22 .\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
23 .\"    without specific prior written permission.
24 .\"
25 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
26 .\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
27 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
28 .\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
29 .\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
30 .\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
31 .\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
32 .\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
33 .\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
34 .\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
35 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
36 .\"
37 .\" $FreeBSD: src/share/man/man8/crash.8,v 1.9.2.5 2002/03/19 01:57:27 dd Exp $
38 .\" $DragonFly: src/share/man/man8/crash.8,v 1.5 2006/07/13 12:38:29 swildner Exp $
39 .\"
40 .Dd February 2, 1996
41 .Dt CRASH 8
42 .Os
43 .Sh NAME
44 .Nm crash
45 .Nd
46 .Dx
47 system failures
48 .Sh DESCRIPTION
49 This section explains a bit about system crashes
50 and (very briefly) how to analyze crash dumps.
51 .Pp
52 When the system crashes voluntarily it prints a message of the form
53 .Bd -ragged -offset indent
54 panic: why i gave up the ghost
55 .Ed
56 .Pp
57 on the console, and if dumps have been enabled (see
58 .Xr dumpon 8 ) ,
59 takes a dump on a mass storage peripheral,
60 and then invokes an automatic reboot procedure as
61 described in
62 .Xr reboot 8 .
63 Unless some unexpected inconsistency is encountered in the state
64 of the file systems due to hardware or software failure, the system
65 will then resume multi-user operations.
66 .Pp
67 The system has a large number of internal consistency checks; if one
68 of these fails, then it will panic with a very short message indicating
69 which one failed.
70 In many instances, this will be the name of the routine which detected
71 the error, or a two-word description of the inconsistency.
72 A full understanding of most panic messages requires perusal of the
73 source code for the system.
74 .Pp
75 The most common cause of system failures is hardware failure, which
76 can reflect itself in different ways.  Here are the messages which
77 are most likely, with some hints as to causes.
78 Left unstated in all cases is the possibility that hardware or software
79 error produced the message in some unexpected way.
80 .Pp
81 .Bl -tag -width Ds -compact
82 .It Sy "cannot mount root"
83 This panic message results from a failure to mount the root filesystem
84 during the bootstrap process.
85 Either the root filesystem has been corrupted,
86 or the system is attempting to use the wrong device as root filesystem.
87 Usually, an alternate copy of the system binary or an alternate root
88 filesystem can be used to bring up the system to investigate.  Most often
89 this is done by the use of the boot floppy you used to install the system,
90 and then using the "fixit" floppy.
91 .Pp
92 .It Sy "init: not found"
93 This is not a panic message, as reboots are likely to be futile.
94 Late in the bootstrap procedure, the system was unable to locate
95 and execute the initialization process,
96 .Xr init 8 .
97 The root filesystem is incorrect or has been corrupted, or the mode
98 or type of
99 .Pa /sbin/init
100 forbids execution or is totally missing.
101 .Pp
102 .Pp
103 .It Sy "ffs_realloccg: bad optim"
104 .It Sy "ffs_valloc: dup alloc"
105 .It Sy "ffs_alloccgblk: cyl groups corrupted"
106 .It Sy "ffs_alloccg: map corrupted"
107 .It Sy "blkfree: freeing free block"
108 .It Sy "blkfree: freeing free frag"
109 .It Sy "ifree: freeing free inode"
110 These panic messages are among those that may be produced
111 when filesystem inconsistencies are detected.
112 The problem generally results from a failure to repair damaged filesystems
113 after a crash, hardware failures, or other condition that should not
114 normally occur.
115 A filesystem check will normally correct the problem.
116 .Pp
117 .It Sy "timeout table full"
118 This really shouldn't be a panic, but until the data structure
119 involved is made to be extensible, running out of entries causes a crash.
120 If this happens, make the timeout table bigger.
121 .Pp
122 .\" .It Sy "trap type %d, code = %x, v = %x"
123 .\" An unexpected trap has occurred within the system; the trap types are:
124 .\" .Bl -column xxxx -offset indent
125 .\" 0   bus error
126 .\" 1   address error
127 .\" 2   illegal instruction
128 .\" 3   divide by zero
129 .\" .No 4\t Em chk No instruction
130 .\" .No 5\t Em trapv No instruction
131 .\" 6   privileged instruction
132 .\" 7   trace trap
133 .\" 8   MMU fault
134 .\" 9   simulated software interrupt
135 .\" 10  format error
136 .\" 11  FP coprocessor fault
137 .\" 12  coprocessor fault
138 .\" 13  simulated AST
139 .\" .El
140 .\" .Pp
141 .\" The favorite trap type in system crashes is trap type 8,
142 .\" indicating a wild reference.
143 .\" ``code'' (hex) is the concatenation of the
144 .\" MMU
145 .\" status register
146 .\" (see <hp300/cpu.h>)
147 .\" in the high 16 bits and the 68020 special status word
148 .\" (see the 68020 manual, page 6-17)
149 .\" in the low 16.
150 .\" ``v'' (hex) is the virtual address which caused the fault.
151 .\" Additionally, the kernel will dump about a screenful of semi-useful
152 .\" information.
153 .\" ``pid'' (decimal) is the process id of the process running at the
154 .\" time of the exception.
155 .\" Note that if we panic in an interrupt routine,
156 .\" this process may not be related to the panic.
157 .\" ``ps'' (hex) is the 68020 processor status register ``ps''.
158 .\" ``pc'' (hex) is the value of the program counter saved
159 .\" on the hardware exception frame.
160 .\" It may
161 .\" .Em not
162 .\" be the PC of the instruction causing the fault.
163 .\" ``sfc'' and ``dfc'' (hex) are the 68020 source/destination function codes.
164 .\" They should always be one.
165 .\" ``p0'' and ``p1'' are the
166 .\" VAX-like
167 .\" region registers.
168 .\" They are of the form:
169 .\" .Pp
170 .\" .Bd -ragged -offset indent
171 .\" <length> '@' <kernel VA>
172 .\" .Ed
173 .\" .Pp
174 .\" where both are in hex.
175 .\" Following these values are a dump of the processor registers (hex).
176 .\" Finally, is a dump of the stack (user/kernel) at the time of the offense.
177 .\" .Pp
178 .It Sy "init died (signal #, exit #)"
179 The system initialization process has exited with the specified signal number and exit code.  This is bad news, as no new
180 users will then be able to log in.  Rebooting is the only fix, so the
181 system just does it right away.
182 .El
183 .Pp
184 That completes the list of panic types you are likely to see.
185 .Pp
186 If the system has been configured to take crash dumps (see
187 .Xr dumpon 8 ) ,
188 then when it crashes it will write (or at least attempt to write)
189 an image of memory into the back end of the dump device,
190 usually the same as the primary swap
191 area.  After the system is rebooted, the program
192 .Xr savecore 8
193 runs and preserves a copy of this core image and the current
194 system in a specified directory for later perusal.  See
195 .Xr savecore 8
196 for details.
197 .Pp
198 To analyze a dump you should begin by running
199 .Xr kgdb 1
200 on the system load image and core dump.
201 If the core image is the result of a panic,
202 the panic message is printed.
203 For more details consult the chapter on kernel debugging in
204 the
205 .Fx
206 Developers' Handbook
207 .Pq Pa http://www.FreeBSD.org/ .
208 .Sh SEE ALSO
209 .Xr kgdb 1 ,
210 .Xr dumpon 8 ,
211 .Xr reboot 8 ,
212 .Xr savecore 8
213 .Sh HISTORY
214 A
215 .Nm
216 man page first appeared in
217 .Fx 2.2 .