DragonFly has decided to depend on char being signed, use it.
[dragonfly.git] / lib / libc / regex / re_format.7
1 .\" Copyright (c) 1992, 1993, 1994 Henry Spencer.
2 .\" Copyright (c) 1992, 1993, 1994
3 .\"     The Regents of the University of California.  All rights reserved.
4 .\"
5 .\" This code is derived from software contributed to Berkeley by
6 .\" Henry Spencer.
7 .\"
8 .\" Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
9 .\" modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
10 .\" are met:
11 .\" 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
12 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
13 .\" 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
14 .\"    notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
15 .\"    documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
16 .\" 3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
17 .\"    must display the following acknowledgement:
18 .\"     This product includes software developed by the University of
19 .\"     California, Berkeley and its contributors.
20 .\" 4. Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
21 .\"    may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
22 .\"    without specific prior written permission.
23 .\"
24 .\" THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE REGENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND
25 .\" ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
26 .\" IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
27 .\" ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
28 .\" FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
29 .\" DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
30 .\" OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
31 .\" HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
32 .\" LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY
33 .\" OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
34 .\" SUCH DAMAGE.
35 .\"
36 .\"     @(#)re_format.7 8.3 (Berkeley) 3/20/94
37 .\" $FreeBSD: src/lib/libc/regex/re_format.7,v 1.4.2.5 2002/01/22 12:40:10 ru Exp $
38 .\" $DragonFly: src/lib/libc/regex/re_format.7,v 1.2 2003/06/17 04:26:44 dillon Exp $
39 .\"
40 .Dd March 20, 1994
41 .Dt RE_FORMAT 7
42 .Os
43 .Sh NAME
44 .Nm re_format
45 .Nd POSIX 1003.2 regular expressions
46 .Sh DESCRIPTION
47 Regular expressions
48 .Pq Dq RE Ns s ,
49 as defined in
50 .St -p1003.2 ,
51 come in two forms:
52 modern REs (roughly those of
53 .Xr egrep 1 ;
54 1003.2 calls these
55 .Dq extended
56 REs)
57 and obsolete REs (roughly those of
58 .Xr ed 1 ;
59 1003.2
60 .Dq basic
61 REs).
62 Obsolete REs mostly exist for backward compatibility in some old programs;
63 they will be discussed at the end.
64 .St -p1003.2
65 leaves some aspects of RE syntax and semantics open;
66 `\(dd' marks decisions on these aspects that
67 may not be fully portable to other
68 .St -p1003.2
69 implementations.
70 .Pp
71 A (modern) RE is one\(dd or more non-empty\(dd
72 .Em branches ,
73 separated by
74 .Ql \&| .
75 It matches anything that matches one of the branches.
76 .Pp
77 A branch is one\(dd or more
78 .Em pieces ,
79 concatenated.
80 It matches a match for the first, followed by a match for the second, etc.
81 .Pp
82 A piece is an
83 .Em atom
84 possibly followed
85 by a single\(dd
86 .Ql \&* ,
87 .Ql \&+ ,
88 .Ql \&? ,
89 or
90 .Em bound .
91 An atom followed by
92 .Ql \&*
93 matches a sequence of 0 or more matches of the atom.
94 An atom followed by
95 .Ql \&+
96 matches a sequence of 1 or more matches of the atom.
97 An atom followed by
98 .Ql ?\&
99 matches a sequence of 0 or 1 matches of the atom.
100 .Pp
101 A
102 .Em bound
103 is
104 .Ql \&{
105 followed by an unsigned decimal integer,
106 possibly followed by
107 .Ql \&,
108 possibly followed by another unsigned decimal integer,
109 always followed by
110 .Ql \&} .
111 The integers must lie between 0 and
112 .Dv RE_DUP_MAX
113 (255\(dd) inclusive,
114 and if there are two of them, the first may not exceed the second.
115 An atom followed by a bound containing one integer
116 .Em i
117 and no comma matches
118 a sequence of exactly
119 .Em i
120 matches of the atom.
121 An atom followed by a bound
122 containing one integer
123 .Em i
124 and a comma matches
125 a sequence of
126 .Em i
127 or more matches of the atom.
128 An atom followed by a bound
129 containing two integers
130 .Em i
131 and
132 .Em j
133 matches
134 a sequence of
135 .Em i
136 through
137 .Em j
138 (inclusive) matches of the atom.
139 .Pp
140 An atom is a regular expression enclosed in
141 .Ql ()
142 (matching a match for the
143 regular expression),
144 an empty set of
145 .Ql ()
146 (matching the null string)\(dd,
147 a
148 .Em bracket expression
149 (see below),
150 .Ql .\&
151 (matching any single character),
152 .Ql \&^
153 (matching the null string at the beginning of a line),
154 .Ql \&$
155 (matching the null string at the end of a line), a
156 .Ql \e
157 followed by one of the characters
158 .Ql ^.[$()|*+?{\e
159 (matching that character taken as an ordinary character),
160 a
161 .Ql \e
162 followed by any other character\(dd
163 (matching that character taken as an ordinary character,
164 as if the
165 .Ql \e
166 had not been present\(dd),
167 or a single character with no other significance (matching that character).
168 A
169 .Ql \&{
170 followed by a character other than a digit is an ordinary
171 character, not the beginning of a bound\(dd.
172 It is illegal to end an RE with
173 .Ql \e .
174 .Pp
175 A
176 .Em bracket expression
177 is a list of characters enclosed in
178 .Ql [] .
179 It normally matches any single character from the list (but see below).
180 If the list begins with
181 .Ql \&^ ,
182 it matches any single character
183 (but see below)
184 .Em not
185 from the rest of the list.
186 If two characters in the list are separated by
187 .Ql \&- ,
188 this is shorthand
189 for the full
190 .Em range
191 of characters between those two (inclusive) in the
192 collating sequence,
193 .No e.g. Ql [0-9]
194 in ASCII matches any decimal digit.
195 It is illegal\(dd for two ranges to share an
196 endpoint,
197 .No e.g. Ql a-c-e .
198 Ranges are very collating-sequence-dependent,
199 and portable programs should avoid relying on them.
200 .Pp
201 To include a literal
202 .Ql \&]
203 in the list, make it the first character
204 (following a possible
205 .Ql \&^ ) .
206 To include a literal
207 .Ql \&- ,
208 make it the first or last character,
209 or the second endpoint of a range.
210 To use a literal
211 .Ql \&-
212 as the first endpoint of a range,
213 enclose it in
214 .Ql [.\&
215 and
216 .Ql .]\&
217 to make it a collating element (see below).
218 With the exception of these and some combinations using
219 .Ql \&[
220 (see next paragraphs), all other special characters, including
221 .Ql \e ,
222 lose their special significance within a bracket expression.
223 .Pp
224 Within a bracket expression, a collating element (a character,
225 a multi-character sequence that collates as if it were a single character,
226 or a collating-sequence name for either)
227 enclosed in
228 .Ql [.\&
229 and
230 .Ql .]\&
231 stands for the
232 sequence of characters of that collating element.
233 The sequence is a single element of the bracket expression's list.
234 A bracket expression containing a multi-character collating element
235 can thus match more than one character,
236 e.g. if the collating sequence includes a
237 .Ql ch
238 collating element,
239 then the RE
240 .Ql [[.ch.]]*c
241 matches the first five characters
242 of
243 .Ql chchcc .
244 .Pp
245 Within a bracket expression, a collating element enclosed in
246 .Ql [=
247 and
248 .Ql =]
249 is an equivalence class, standing for the sequences of characters
250 of all collating elements equivalent to that one, including itself.
251 (If there are no other equivalent collating elements,
252 the treatment is as if the enclosing delimiters were
253 .Ql [.\&
254 and
255 .Ql .] . )
256 For example, if
257 .Ql x
258 and
259 .Ql y
260 are the members of an equivalence class,
261 then
262 .Ql [[=x=]] ,
263 .Ql [[=y=]] ,
264 and
265 .Ql [xy]
266 are all synonymous.
267 An equivalence class may not\(dd be an endpoint
268 of a range.
269 .Pp
270 Within a bracket expression, the name of a
271 .Em character class
272 enclosed in
273 .Ql [:
274 and
275 .Ql :]
276 stands for the list of all characters belonging to that
277 class.
278 Standard character class names are:
279 .Pp
280 .Bl -column "alnum" "digit" "xdigit" -offset indent
281 .It Em "alnum   digit   punct"
282 .It Em "alpha   graph   space"
283 .It Em "blank   lower   upper"
284 .It Em "cntrl   print   xdigit"
285 .El
286 .Pp
287 These stand for the character classes defined in
288 .Xr ctype 3 .
289 A locale may provide others.
290 A character class may not be used as an endpoint of a range.
291 .Pp
292 There are two special cases\(dd of bracket expressions:
293 the bracket expressions
294 .Ql [[:<:]]
295 and
296 .Ql [[:>:]]
297 match the null string at the beginning and end of a word respectively.
298 A word is defined as a sequence of word characters
299 which is neither preceded nor followed by
300 word characters.
301 A word character is an
302 .Em alnum
303 character (as defined by
304 .Xr ctype 3 )
305 or an underscore.
306 This is an extension,
307 compatible with but not specified by
308 .St -p1003.2 ,
309 and should be used with
310 caution in software intended to be portable to other systems.
311 .Pp
312 In the event that an RE could match more than one substring of a given
313 string,
314 the RE matches the one starting earliest in the string.
315 If the RE could match more than one substring starting at that point,
316 it matches the longest.
317 Subexpressions also match the longest possible substrings, subject to
318 the constraint that the whole match be as long as possible,
319 with subexpressions starting earlier in the RE taking priority over
320 ones starting later.
321 Note that higher-level subexpressions thus take priority over
322 their lower-level component subexpressions.
323 .Pp
324 Match lengths are measured in characters, not collating elements.
325 A null string is considered longer than no match at all.
326 For example,
327 .Ql bb*
328 matches the three middle characters of
329 .Ql abbbc ,
330 .Ql (wee|week)(knights|nights)
331 matches all ten characters of
332 .Ql weeknights ,
333 when
334 .Ql (.*).*\&
335 is matched against
336 .Ql abc
337 the parenthesized subexpression
338 matches all three characters, and
339 when
340 .Ql (a*)*
341 is matched against
342 .Ql bc
343 both the whole RE and the parenthesized
344 subexpression match the null string.
345 .Pp
346 If case-independent matching is specified,
347 the effect is much as if all case distinctions had vanished from the
348 alphabet.
349 When an alphabetic that exists in multiple cases appears as an
350 ordinary character outside a bracket expression, it is effectively
351 transformed into a bracket expression containing both cases,
352 .No e.g. Ql x
353 becomes
354 .Ql [xX] .
355 When it appears inside a bracket expression, all case counterparts
356 of it are added to the bracket expression, so that (e.g.)
357 .Ql [x]
358 becomes
359 .Ql [xX]
360 and
361 .Ql [^x]
362 becomes
363 .Ql [^xX] .
364 .Pp
365 No particular limit is imposed on the length of REs\(dd.
366 Programs intended to be portable should not employ REs longer
367 than 256 bytes,
368 as an implementation can refuse to accept such REs and remain
369 POSIX-compliant.
370 .Pp
371 Obsolete
372 .Pq Dq basic
373 regular expressions differ in several respects.
374 .Ql \&|
375 is an ordinary character and there is no equivalent
376 for its functionality.
377 .Ql \&+
378 and
379 .Ql ?\&
380 are ordinary characters, and their functionality
381 can be expressed using bounds
382 .No ( Ql {1,}
383 or
384 .Ql {0,1}
385 respectively).
386 Also note that
387 .Ql x+
388 in modern REs is equivalent to
389 .Ql xx* .
390 The delimiters for bounds are
391 .Ql \e{
392 and
393 .Ql \e} ,
394 with
395 .Ql \&{
396 and
397 .Ql \&}
398 by themselves ordinary characters.
399 The parentheses for nested subexpressions are
400 .Ql \e(
401 and
402 .Ql \e) ,
403 with
404 .Ql \&(
405 and
406 .Ql \&)
407 by themselves ordinary characters.
408 .Ql \&^
409 is an ordinary character except at the beginning of the
410 RE or\(dd the beginning of a parenthesized subexpression,
411 .Ql \&$
412 is an ordinary character except at the end of the
413 RE or\(dd the end of a parenthesized subexpression,
414 and
415 .Ql \&*
416 is an ordinary character if it appears at the beginning of the
417 RE or the beginning of a parenthesized subexpression
418 (after a possible leading
419 .Ql \&^ ) .
420 Finally, there is one new type of atom, a
421 .Em back reference :
422 .Ql \e
423 followed by a non-zero decimal digit
424 .Em d
425 matches the same sequence of characters
426 matched by the
427 .Em d Ns th
428 parenthesized subexpression
429 (numbering subexpressions by the positions of their opening parentheses,
430 left to right),
431 so that (e.g.)
432 .Ql \e([bc]\e)\e1
433 matches
434 .Ql bb
435 or
436 .Ql cc
437 but not
438 .Ql bc .
439 .Sh SEE ALSO
440 .Xr regex 3
441 .Rs
442 .%T Regular Expression Notation
443 .%R IEEE Std
444 .%N 1003.2
445 .%P section 2.8
446 .Re
447 .Sh BUGS
448 Having two kinds of REs is a botch.
449 .Pp
450 The current
451 .St -p1003.2
452 spec says that
453 .Ql \&)
454 is an ordinary character in
455 the absence of an unmatched
456 .Ql \&( ;
457 this was an unintentional result of a wording error,
458 and change is likely.
459 Avoid relying on it.
460 .Pp
461 Back references are a dreadful botch,
462 posing major problems for efficient implementations.
463 They are also somewhat vaguely defined
464 (does
465 .Ql a\e(\e(b\e)*\e2\e)*d
466 match
467 .Ql abbbd ? ) .
468 Avoid using them.
469 .Pp
470 .St -p1003.2
471 specification of case-independent matching is vague.
472 The
473 .Dq one case implies all cases
474 definition given above
475 is current consensus among implementors as to the right interpretation.
476 .Pp
477 The syntax for word boundaries is incredibly ugly.